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Intro

Contents

Statement of compliance

For the year ended 30 June 2021
Hon David Templeman Dip Tchg BEd MLA
Minister for Tourism; Culture and the Arts; Heritage; Leader of the House

In accordance with section 63 of the Financial Management Act 2006, I hereby submit for your information and presentation to Parliament, the Annual Report of the Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries for the reporting period ended 30 June 2021.

The Annual Report has been prepared in accordance with the provisions of the Financial Management Act 2006.

Lanie Chopping
Director General
Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries

15 October 2021

Director General's Foreword

The past year has been shaped by the collective efforts from across Government, the community and private sector to deal with the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic.

While the State Emergency Management Act is still in effect, in Western Australia we are in the fortunate position of turning our attention towards COVID recovery and supporting those who have been most affected.

This is due to the State Government and the WA community’s response to the pandemic, which has spared this State from the situation being faced by other parts of Australia and around the world.

With many of our key stakeholders actively involved in communities, DLGSC has played a pivotal role in some of the State’s biggest recovery programs.

These programs include:

  • The $9 million Getting the Show back on the Road program, which provided support to over 149 events
  • The Creative Communities COVID-19 Recovery Program delivered in partnership with Lotterywest, supported 28 projects
  • Two major infrastructure capital projects valued at $45 million, and 16 funding agreements valued at $126.2 million
  • $3 million to support culturally and linguistically diverse (CaLD) communities carry out capital works to improve existing facilities
  • The Back to Sport program, which added $5 million to the KidSport program, in partnership with Lotterywest
  • $1.6 million Sport Development Fund, which provided funding of up to $40,000 for small to medium sporting associations

In addition to these programs, regulatory provisions were extended to enable local governments to support their community by providing financial exemptions to those suffering economic hardship as a result of the pandemic.

Furthermore, application processes have been streamlined for licensed premises to help them cope with instances of snap lockdowns and changes in capacity restrictions. The DLGSC has also allowed variation of licenses to allow for the sale of takeaway alcohol.

The impact of our work at DLGSC has extended well beyond Western Australia.

In recognition of our State’s significant ties with India, in May 2021 the Premier committed $2 million in relief funding to our Indian Ocean neighbour.

The Office of Multicultural Interests (OMI) administered grants to 12 WA Indian community associations working in partnership with registered Australian charities to deliver crisis relief activities on the ground in India.

The DLGSC has responded to the challenges of our current circumstances — opening the door to new ways of innovating and supporting our sectors through this time.

The Selling WA to World Initiative provides a platform to live stream and record performances for consumption anywhere in the world. Perth Theatre Trust venues will soon have the equipment to make this a reality, ensuring an ongoing global presence for our local performers, sharing Western Australian stories with the world.

Throughout the course of the pandemic, DLGSC staff have worked closely with the Department of the Premier and Cabinet and the Pandemic Coordination Unit to provide vital support and to ensure the needs of our stakeholders are accounted for.

As we move forward with our recovery efforts, we turn our focus to supporting the State Government’s vaccine rollout program.

To that end, we are working with stakeholders across the community to ensure they have access to up-to-date, bespoke information and that they are empowered to drive the vaccine rollout program to their communities.

Outside of our support for pandemic response and recovery, ongoing work to support and strengthen our communities continues.

Western Australia’s arts sector provides enormous economic and social benefits for the community and is an important growth area that will contribute to the State’s Recovery Plan and Diversify WA.

The creative industries have faced significant disruption due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Creating jobs and opportunities is the best way to support this sector and ensure shared economic prosperity.

In 2020-21 DLGSC distributed more than $48.3 million to this sector, including $6.9 million in COVID recovery programs.

The Regional Arts and Cultural Investment Program (RACIP) will deliver almost $20 million to regional WA ensuring the livability and vibrancy of regional communities. The Regional Exhibition Touring Boost (RETB) has supported several exhibitions and tours over the last year, despite the impacts of COVID-19, and delivered skills development and networking opportunities for regional curators and arts workers.

The DLGSC delivered the first of three year’s funding for the Connecting to Country program to support Aboriginal people, communities and organisations to undertake on-Country trips that foster intergenerational transfer of knowledge and preservation of culture.

The WA Cultural Infrastructure Framework 2030+, Western Australia's first ever roadmap for holistic cultural infrastructure planning and investment in the State, was released in December 2020. This framework, developed through extensive stakeholder consultations, will guide the planning of cultural infrastructure and drive participation in culture and the arts.

This year saw the announcement of the $1.5 billion Perth City Deal — a ten-year partnership between the Australian Government, the State Government and the City of Perth.

This exciting project aims to reenergize Perth and bring government and private investment to the CBD.

The DLGSC is leading the delivery of two Perth City Deal projects which will have a significant impact on way people live, work and play in the city for generations to come.

The State Government commitment of $100 million to build a screen production facility has generated much interest across the community. The DLGSC is currently working with the Department of Finance to deliver the market-led proposal. This project will generate opportunities not just during design and construction but for the wider creative industries in WA.

While these big infrastructure projects are exciting, the smaller grassroots projects have an equally huge impact in the community. Over the year, 90 projects worth over $12.8 million were approved for funding under the Community Sporting and Recreation Facilities Fund to assist community groups and local governments to develop community sport and recreation infrastructure.

The past year has seen the delivery of a number of initiatives to promote community participation in sport and recreation activities and support the sector that was heavily impacted by COVID-19.

The Strategic Funding Review of the Western Australian sport and recreation industry was completed in November with all twelve recommendations implemented. This has streamlined DLGSC business processes to reduce administrative burdens on smaller community organisations and ensured funding programs are effectively supporting the sector. This led to the development of the Sport Development Fund and the Innovation Challenge Program in partnership with Healthway.

The long-running KidSport program continues to provide opportunities for kids to play sport and was extended in 2021 to include swimming lessons. Fifty-two swim schools have been registered, giving 1,158 kids access to swimming lessons through $168,014 in funding. More than 29,000 KidSport vouchers were approved in the last year, which equates to an investment of $4,058,063 for community sport and recreation clubs.

Recreation camps have performed strongly over the last year despite the impact of COVID-19 with more than 1000 bookings with 144,068 instructor led activities. Camp instructors delivered more than 216,100 hours of physical activity for participants.

Significant projects have also been delivered under the WA Hiking Strategy to ensure Western Australians continue to have the best opportunity to enjoy the great outdoors.

In 2020-21 this has included providing funding to 14 projects that support inclusivity, entry level experiences and the development of people-led hiking activities.

Across the state, the regional services team have continued to work closely with regional communities, local government and the sport and recreation industry to deliver several valuable funding programs. Regional staff have contributed to a number of inter-agency groups and committees to inform strategic policy development and to ensure the objectives of the broader department are central to the planning within regional communities.

Aboriginal History WA (AHWA) has continued to provide comprehensive responses including genealogies to applicants seeking personal and ancestral information. For the period a total of 829 applications were received. Responses comprised 322 family history applications, 426 to the National Redress Scheme and 34 to the Registrar of Birth Deaths and Marriages and 47 other requests to access restricted archives.

Several significant historical projects were completed to increase knowledge of the shared history of Western Australian and contributing to the reconciliation and healing journey.

One of the projects undertaken focuses on the history of incarceration on Wadjemup (Rottnest Island) from 1900-1931 and provides detailed information regarding the 391 Aboriginal prisoners detained on the island during this period. The resource includes dates of admission and discharge, photographs of prisoners and activities performed while imprisoned at Wadjemup.

Another unique project identifies the 440 Application for Leases made by Aboriginal people throughout the state between 1887 to 1933. The information includes historical maps showing the location of each lease in relation to nearest town and a database detailing the applicant, date of application and size of property sought.

Continuing our work in cultural spaces, DLGSC is also home to the Office of Multicultural Interests (OMI).

In November, OMI launched the Language Services Policy 2020 with the aim of ensuring equitable access to WA public sector services through the provision of languages services. This is a crucial policy for a State as culturally diverse as ours, and it is encouraging to see it being enthusiastically adopted across the public sector.

OMI hosted the Western Australian Multicultural Awards in March 2021 as part of Harmony Week. The Awards celebrated the achievements of Western Australians who have accomplished outstanding work in advancing multiculturalism. Individuals and organisations were recognised across 11 categories in front of an audience of community and sector leaders.

Over the course of the year OMI has worked with public sector agencies to support implementation of the Western Australian Multicultural Policy Framework (WAMPF) with around 90% of departments submitting Multicultural Plans. To further agencies’ work, a WAMPF community of practice was established to encourage partnerships and share information and good practice across the sector.

2021 marks 150 years of local government in Western Australia and DLGSC is committed to help support and develop this sector that is now such an integral part of our community. The DLGSC is working with our stakeholders in the sector to focus on enhanced local government accountability and integrity; planning and financial management; and better community engagement and inclusion.

In 2020-21, further reforms have been implemented to guide actions, decisions and behaviours that reflect community expectations and support consistency across local governments. A mandatory code of conduct has been introduced to support ethical and accountable conduct, as well standards for best practice and procedural fairness in relation to the recruitment and management of Chief Executive Officers (CEO).

With Ordinary Elections held in October 2021, DLGSC has revised and updated the mandatory induction course for prospective candidates, including information on the new code of conduct that applies to council members, committee members and candidates.

The DLGSC has continued to work collaboratively with local government stakeholders on a number of programs including the CEO Support Programs and Peer Support Program, which aim to support and build capability in the sector.

We have also been working in collaboration with the liquor industry to develop a community-led initiative designed to target problem drinking and protect the vulnerable.

In December, the DLGSC launched a Banned Drinker Register (BDR) trial in the Pilbara to assist licensees to easily identify banned drinkers.

In July, a further trial was launched in the Kimberley. This includes a BDR and Takeaway Alcohol Management Systems (TAMS), to allow customers to responsibly purchase alcohol according to a daily limit.

There has been strong community support for this trial, and it is set to become more effective with DLGSC developing a mobile app to provide a real-time tool for licensees to identify banned drinkers.

Overall, DLGSC has had a challenging year working to support communities and industries impacted by COVID-19 while continuing to deliver business as usual programs and activities.

The DLGSC remains committed to enabling dynamic and inclusive communities to support the WA economy. The staff are to be commended for their hard work and dedication and we look forward continuing to deliver outcomes for our stakeholders in the next financial year.

Having joined DLGSC on 31 May 2021 it has been a pleasure to meet the many dedicated and skilled team members and I look forward to the year ahead working to deliver public value for Western Australia.

Lanie Chopping
Director General
Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries

Executive summary

The DLGSC provides a wide range of services that connect Western Australians. Working across industry and government sectors, it provides leadership and policy advice to inform programs and services across state-wide activities including sport and recreation, cultural endeavours and multicultural initiatives that bring our community together. Through its core functions, DLGSC also provides support to local governments and the racing, gaming and liquor industries to maintain quality and compliance with legislation through its regulatory services. All activities undertaken by DLGSC are underpinned by our values and strategic direction, guiding the performance against financial and service delivery outcomes. In 2020-21, DLGSC worked closely with its diverse portfolio areas to provide support during a challenging time, with a range of key initiatives as outlined below.

  • The Local Government Amendment (COVID-19 Response) Act 2020 provides for the Minister to modify or suspend provisions of the Act or Regulations due to consequences of the pandemic. During 2020-21, amendments were made to the Local Government (COVID-19 Response) Order 2020 to enable local governments to hold electors’ general and special meetings and continue to provide assistance to Western Australian ratepayers suffering financial hardship as a result of the pandemic.
  • Getting the Show Back on the Road Program is part of the $76 million State Government Recovery Plan for culture and the arts. It is a risk share program aimed at supporting the live performance industry, the first and hardest hit as COVID-19 restrictions were put in place across the state. Since November 2020, 149 performing arts and live music events have applied for support with claims made to the value of $4.6 million. The Program has been instrumental to the continued delivery of the Perth Festival, the FRINGE WORLD Festival and a number of independent large-scale events. Without the surety of the Program these events may not have gone ahead.
  • Implementation of the Western Australian Multicultural Policy Framework across the WA public sector saw agencies embrace the Framework. As at 30 June 2021, 49 WA public sector agencies had developed and submitted Multicultural Plans to the Minister for Citizenship and Multicultural Interests. Strategies, measures and key performance indicators identified in multicultural plans will ensure Western Australians from Culturally and Linguistically Diverse backgrounds have opportunities to access services and participate equitably in every aspect of our civic, social, economic and cultural life.
  • Announced on 20 September 2020, the Perth City Deal will unlock economic benefits and opportunities for Perth’s central city, re-energise Perth and bring government and private investment into the CBD. The DLGSC is leading the delivery of $20 million Perth Cultural Centre rejuvenation project and the $42 million Perth Concert Hall project.
  • The DLGSC has worked with the liquor industry to implement a Banned Drinkers Register (BDR) trial in the Pilbara region. The BDR incorporates a system to identify persons who are not permitted to purchase liquor and notifies the licensee accordingly. The trial commenced in the Pilbara region in December 2020 and licensees are participating on a voluntary basis over a two-year period. In May 2021 a further trial was launched in the Kimberley region. The Kimberley trial will incorporate a BDR and a Takeaway Alcohol Management System. The trial is intended to provide benefits including better targeting of individuals who abuse alcohol to access support services, informing licensees where barring or prohibitions are in place and as a complementary measure to other harm reduction strategies.

In addition to the key achievements listed above, there has been a strong focus on governance this financial year, with the support of the Office of the Auditor General (OAG). Given the breadth and depth of DLGSC’s interface with the community, integrity and transparency is critical to ensure Western Australians feel confident in how DLGSC operates.

The impact of COVID-19 has been felt in 2020-21, with DLGSC’s ongoing management and support for key stakeholders as one of the year’s great successes. Along with government, business, community organisations and CaLD communities, DLGSC played a significant role in ensuring our sectors had access to the best advice and guidance to minimise operational impacts across the cultural, sport and hospitality industries over the financial year.

Whilst 2020-21 has not been without its challenges, DLGSC has shown its resilience to continue to facilitate opportunities that contribute to the wellbeing of the WA community. Looking ahead to 2021-22, DLGSC will maintain its focus on improving capacity and outcomes across the local government, sport and recreation and cultural sectors for the betterment of all Western Australians.

Agency overview

Agency profile

The Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries (DLGSC) works with partners across government and within its diverse sectors to enliven the Western Australian community and economy through support for and provision of sporting, recreational, cultural and artistic policy, programs and activities for locals and visitors to the State.

The DLGSC provides regulation and support to local governments and the racing, gaming and liquor industries to maintain quality and compliance with relevant legislation, for the benefit of all Western Australians.

Strategic Directions: 2020-2023

Vision

A vibrant, inclusive and resilient WA community

Mission

To enable dynamic and inclusive communities and support the WA economy

Values

  • Respectful
  • Customer Focused
  • Responsive
  • Accountable
  • Innovative

What we do

  • Contribute to the wellbeing of the community.
  • Improve capability and outcomes across the local government, sport and recreation and culture and arts sectors.
  • Enable equitable participation of CaLD communities across all aspects of society and promote, support and celebrate the State’s cultural diversity.
  • Encourage and enable understanding the history of WA, including Aboriginal cultures, as context for contemporary society.
  • Facilitate public engagement with highly valued sporting, cultural and recreational spaces and places.

Objectives

  • To support the public sector through a fit for purpose, sound legislative and policy framework that enables efficient and effective services to the community, supported by good governance.
  • To promote participation and achievement in sport, recreation, culture and arts.
  • To support and grow the cultural industries.
  • To promote and enhance the benefits of cultural diversity and social inclusion.
  • To ensure liquor and gambling activities are conducted in the public interest.
  • To celebrate Aboriginal culture and preserve history and traditions.

Approach

To achieve this, we will:

  • Work collaboratively with the community, all tiers of government and key stakeholders to implement a shared approach to improve community engagement and experience.
  • Be efficient, effective and responsive through an agile and flexible workforce.
  • Respond proactively to State Government imperatives such as election commitments and stated strategic priorities.
  • Contribute to the achievement of whole-of-State Government targets.
  • Use evidence-based information to develop community focused engagement and partnerships.

Objectives

Strategic Direction Setting
StrategiesPrograms
1. Strategic priority and infrastructure programs
  1. WA Recovery Plan — infrastructure investment program of work
  2. Local Government Sustainability — program of work
  3. State Football Centre
  4. State Sporting Infrastructure Plan — implementation
  5. Screen infrastructure
  6. Strategic asset maintenance guidance and monitoring
  7. Creative Industries Strategy
  8. Multicultural Policy Framework
  9. Regional Aboriginal Communities Framework.
2. Sector sustainability, capacity building and excellence
  1. WA Recovery Plan — sustainability program of work
  2. Legislative and policy reform — ongoing, new and associated
  3. Review Cemeteries and Cremations Act
  4. Public Open Space Policy and Shared User Guide for education facilities
  5. Child Safeguarding
  6. Women in sport and leadership
  7. Guidance/monitoring of sector infrastructure management practices
  8. Motorsport Strategy — continue implementation
  9. Off Road Vehicle Reform
  10. Develop innovative ways to progress Asian Engagement
  11. Support CaLD communities to deliver events
  12. Regulations to support the Liquor Control Amendment Bill 2018
  13. Trial of a Banned Drinkers Register/Takeaway Alcohol Management System
  14. National Framework for Consumer Protection for online gambling
  15. Implement regulatory regime for private operator of TAB
  16. Support Aboriginal Cultural Centre
  17. Lead truth telling Aboriginal History projects
  18. Information Management Framework
  19. Local government capability building
  20. State Local Government Partnership Agreement
  21. Community Wellbeing Progress Index.
3. Agile operations and strong business support systems
  1. Develop Public Value Model and measurement framework
  2. Culture and values program — embedding values and behaviours
  3. Workforce planning — embed fit for purpose operating model
  4. Proactively address Audit (OAG) recommendations to mitigate risks identified
  5. Leverage Financial capabilities across project controls/program management and maintain high standards of financial management and accounting
  6. Business improvement program — redesign processes aligned to audits
  7. System Enhancement and Digitisation (incl. digital security), contemporary systems integration (new technologies) and realise benefits of existing systems
  8. Contemporary Engagement Models (incl. developing materiality frameworks)
  9. Enhance evidence base and business intelligence for decision making
  10. Explore innovation funding/alternative funding models.

Responsible Ministers

The DLGSC was established on 1 July 2017 under the Public Sector Management Act 1994. At 30 June 2021, DLGSC was responsible to the following Ministers:

  • Hon Dr Tony Buti MLA BPE (Hons), DipEd, MIR, LLB (Hons), DPhil
    In his roles as Minister for Sport and Recreation and Citizenship and Multicultural Affairs.
  • Hon John Carey MLA BA (Hons)
    In his role as Minister for Local Government.
  • Hon Stephen Dawson MLC
    In his role as Minister for Aboriginal Affairs.
  • Hon David Templeman Dip Tchg BEd MLA
    In his role as Minister for Culture and the Arts.
  • Hon Reece Whitby MLA
    In his role as Minister for Racing and Gaming.

Legislation administered

The DLGSC assisted in the administration of the following legislation on behalf of its portfolio Ministers as at 30 June 2021.

  • Art Gallery Act 1959
  • Betting Control Act 1954
  • Caravan Parks and Camping Grounds Act 1995
  • Casino (Burswood Island) Agreement Act 1985
  • Casino Control Act 1954
  • Cat Act 2011
  • Cemeteries Act 1986
  • City of Perth Act 2016
  • Combat Sports Act 1987
  • Control of Vehicles (Off-road Areas) Act 1978
  • Dog Act 1976
  • Gaming and Betting (Contracts and Securities) Act 1985
  • Gaming and Wagering Commission (Continuing Lotteries Levy) Act 2000
  • Library Board of Western Australia Act 1951
  • Liquor Control Act 1988
  • Local Government (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 1960
  • Local Government Act 1995
  • Local Government Grants Act 1978
  • Major Events (Aerial Advertising) Act 2009
  • Maritime Archaeology Act 1973
  • Museum Act 1969
  • Perth Theatre Trust Act 1979
  • Racing and Wagering Western Australia Act 2003
  • Racing Bets Levy Act 2009
  • Racing Penalties (Appeals) Act 1990
  • Racing Restriction Act 2003
  • South Fremantle Oil Installations Pipe Line Act 1948
  • Sports Drug Testing Act 2001
  • State Records Act 2000
  • Sunset Reserve Transformation Act 2014
  • TAB (Disposal) Act 2019
  • The Western Australian Turf Club Act 1892
  • Western Australian Greyhound Racing Association Act 1981
  • Western Australian Trotting Association Act 1946
  • Western Australian Turf Club (Property) Act 1944

Enabling legislation

In performing its functions, DLGSC is compliant with relevant law, including, but not limited to:

  • Auditor General Act 2006
  • Disabilities Services Act 1993
  • Equal Opportunity Act 1984
  • Financial Management Act 2006
  • Freedom of Information Act 1992
  • Industrial Relations Act 1979
  • Legal Deposit Act 2012
  • Minimum Conditions of Employment Act 1993
  • Occupational Safety and Health Act 1984
  • Public Interest Disclosure Act 2003
  • Public Sector Management Act 1994
  • Salaries and Allowances Act 1975
  • State Records Act 2000
  • State Superannuation Act 2000
  • State Supply Commission Act 1991
  • Workers’ Compensation and Injury Management Act 1981

Operational structure

Structure as at 30 June 2021

Operational structure at 30 June 2021 with detail listed below
  • Director General
    Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries
    • Western Australian Museum
    • Art Gallery of Western Australia
    • State Library of Western Australia
    • Perth Theatre Trust
    • Regulatory Services
      • Policy and Innovation
      • Decision and Review
      • Local Government
      • Applications
    • Infrastructure
      • Infrastructure Policy and Governance
      • Infrastructure Planning and Investment
      • Place Management and Asset Maintenance
    • Sport and Recreation
      • Strategy and Investment
      • Sport Development and Engagement (includes Combat Sports Commission)
      • Recreation and Camps
      • Regional Services
    • Culture and the Arts
      • Industry Partnerships and Development
      • Investment Research and Policy
    • Office of Multicultural Interests
      • Community Engagement and Strategy
      • Community Relations and Information
      • Strategy and Planning
    • Aboriginal History WA
    • State Records Office
    • Strategy and Governance
      • Corporate Communications
      • Planning and Accountability
      • Coordination and Performance
    • Finance and Procurement
      • Finance
      • Procurement
      • Payroll
    • Corporate Services
      • Business Operations
      • Digital and Technology Services
      • Human Resources
      • Legal Services

Portfolio structure — DLGSC Interagency relationships

Portfolio structure as outlined below

  • Portfolio structure — DLGSC interagency relationships
    • Judicial/semi-judicial
      • Liquor Commission
      • Local Government Standards Panel
      • Racing Penalties Appeal Tribunal
    • Regulator
      • Combat Sports Commission
      • Gaming and Wagering Commission
      • State Records Commission
    • Advisory
      • State Records Advisory Committee
      • Control of Vehicles (Off Road Area) Act Advisory Committee
      • Local Government Advisory Board
    • Service delivery
      • Gaming Community Trust
      • Local Government Grants Commission
      • Western Australian Museum
      • State Library of Western Australia
      • VenuesWest
      • Problem Gambling Support Services
      • State Records Office
      • Art Gallery of Western Australia
      • Perth Theatre Trust
      • Swan Bells Foundation

Executive leadership

The DLGSC has the following business areas: local government, regulatory services, infrastructure, sport and recreation, culture and the arts, Aboriginal History WA, Office of Multicultural Interests (OMI) and State Records Office. These business areas are supported by the operational areas of corporate services, finance and strategy and governance.

Below are the executive leadership roles at 30 June 2021.

PositionRole
Director GeneralLanie Chopping
Acting Deputy Director General — Special ProjectsFiona Roche
Deputy Director GeneralMichael Connolly
Assistant Director General, Strategy and GovernanceVacant
Executive Director Corporate ServicesGlen Kar
Executive Director Sport and RecreationKim Ellwood
Acting Executive Director Culture and the ArtsRob Didcoe
Executive Director InfrastructureLisa Fanciulli
Director Aboriginal History UnitAnna Wyatt
Acting Executive Director Office of Multicultural InterestsJames Jegasothy
Acting Executive Director Finance and ProcurementShanaeya Sherdiwala
Executive Director Local GovernmentTim Fraser
State Archivist and Executive Director State RecordsDamian Shepherd

Business areas

Culture and the arts

The business area supports the delivery of arts and culture activities through strong evidence-based policy, research, advice, advocacy and funding across Western Australia to achieve State Government outcomes. The business area undertakes the development and implementation of research and industry projects to strengthen the policy basis of its programs and services.

Working with a range of stakeholders and partners, the business area provides information and opportunities to foster growth, connections and access to industry intelligence.

This includes statistics on culture and the arts funding, employment, attendance and participation, and Western Australia’s values and attitudes towards culture and the arts.

The business area funds a cohort of non-government arts organisations as a base from which they can then generate additional income through sponsorship, box office and other agencies to support their annual program of activities.

It also provides project funding to provide artists and creatives opportunities to undertake a broad range of projects and activities across multiple art forms. Investment in arts and culture is essential to ensure Western Australians have ongoing access to arts and culture activities and experiences.

Infrastructure

The Infrastructure business area works with cultural organisations, sports associations and local governments to lead the planning, delivery and maintenance of facilities that provide the built assets Western Australians need to be vibrant, inclusive and resilient.

It provides leadership to promote and guide infrastructure planning and develop sound policy based on the key principles of facility provision. It manages and maintains key civic infrastructure across the sport and recreation, and culture and the arts portfolios and provides client agency services for the planning and delivery of major state sport

and cultural infrastructure projects in line with the Department of Treasury’s Strategic Asset Management Framework.

The business area also delivers the Community Sporting and Recreation Facilities Fund, State Sporting Infrastructure Fund and infrastructure related election commitments.

It provides strategic policy, leadership, and funding support on civic infrastructure planning and delivery across local government.

Local government

The DLGSC partners with local government to deliver good governance to the community.

The DLGSC administers the Local Government Act 1995 (the Act), which establishes the system of local government in Western Australia. The DLGSC also administers a range of legislation impacting on local governments and the community, including dogs, cats and cemeteries, and receives and processes statutory applications.

By monitoring, promoting and enforcing compliance with the Act, the local government business area assists the sector to improve the capacity and accountability of 139 local governments to respond to community demands and expectations. Using a risk-based approach to identify those needing targeted intervention and assistance, this supports local governments to fulfil their statutory obligations.

The business area develops and implements legislative reform initiatives with the aim of optimising the delivery of local government services to the community in alignment with government strategic priorities. This includes extensive engagement with stakeholders, and undertakes research and analysis, to identify reform opportunities. The business area also provides advice, support and expertise to facilitate the adoption of reforms by the local government sector.

The DLGSC works across government to support engagement with local government.

This ensures local government is considered in whole-of-government policy development and represented in key government reform initiatives.

The DLGSC works with peak bodies to provide the sector with networking, leadership, mentoring, and coaching opportunities to further foster best practice in local government.

Office of Multicultural Interests

Through the development and implementation of policies, programs and services, the business area aims to achieve the full potential of multiculturalism. Western Australia is one of the most culturally, linguistically and religiously diverse states in Australia, with 32% of the population born overseas. The State is home to people originating from 190 countries, speaking around 240 languages and dialects, including Aboriginal languages, and following more than 100 faiths. The development and implementation of culturally inclusive policies, programs and services requires the Office of Multicultural Interests to work with business and industry groups, government and non-government agencies, culturally and linguistically diverse communities and the wider community.

Regulation

The Regulation business area receives, processes and determines applications in accordance with the legislation. The business area administers a range of legislation impacting on local governments and the community including dogs, cats and cemeteries relating to approvals, compliance monitoring and other statutory support. The business area provides a licensing service for the liquor and gambling industries and applications are considered and determined on their merits in accordance with the relevant legislative requirements. Audits and inspections are conducted to verify that the provision of gambling is conducted in a responsible and lawful manner. Undertakes regular audits and inspections to regulate the sale, supply and consumption of liquor, and to minimise harm and ill-health to the public. Additionally, inspections are undertaken to ensure that licensed premises are operating and being maintained to a standard that meets consumer expectations.

Sport and recreation

The sport and recreation business area recognises the importance of more Western Australians having the opportunity to participate and progress in quality sport and active recreation more often, through a well-informed and connected sector which is innovative, encourages participation, safe, develops talent and is responsive to changing community needs. Participation in sport and active recreation contributes to mental and physical wellbeing, as well as the development of strong networks and support structures within the community. The DLGSC works with the industry to support athletes and teams to achieve at all levels, including local, national and international competitions.

The business area provides strategic leadership and support for the sport and active recreation industry across Western Australia, through funding and advice to state sporting associations, community organisations and local governments. It proactively engages with the industry to determine and implement strategic responses to current and emerging issues and to review DLGSC’s programs and services. The business area works with the industry to support athletes and teams to achieve at all levels, including local, national and international competitions. By building on the existing capabilities of individuals and organisations, the business area enables them to operate efficiently and effectively and provide quality opportunities for participation in sport and active recreation.

Through the management of five recreation camps, the business area also provides experiential outdoor activities to the Western Australian community. They are a successful community service operation delivering quality, affordable, accessible camp experiences in Western Australia.

Aboriginal History WA (AHWA)

The business area undertakes expert research and provides comprehensive responses to Aboriginal people seeking historical family information through a formal Family History application process. AHWA also manages access to restricted government records previously managed by the Department of Aboriginal Affairs.

In addition to these core services, AHWA undertakes strategic truth-telling projects to increase understanding of the shared history of Western Australia that contribute to healing and reconciliation. AHWA’s role focuses on addressing key recommendations of the Bringing Them Home Report 1997 that relate to the provision of Aboriginal family history information, reunion, information dissemination and access to State records. The role aligns with key elements of the Western Australian Aboriginal Empowerment Strategy and the Closing the Gap Agreement 2020 and is built around consultation with Aboriginal people, strong accountability, and culturally secure ways of working.

The area also responds to requests under the National Redress Scheme (Redress) from Aboriginal applicants throughout Western Australia. This work is undertaken in response to recommendations of the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse.

State Records Office (SRO)

The SRO supports the State Records Commission (the Commission) in administering regulation of the management of records of information across Western Australian public sector according to the requirements of the State Records Act 2000 (the Act). The Commission was established in 2001 under the terms of Part 8 of the Act. The Commission's functions are set out in the section 60 of the Act and include approving Record Keeping Plans for government organisations and the legal disposal of government records:

Under section 61 of the Act, the Commission must establish principles and standards for the governance of record keeping by State organisations and provide guidelines to assist the compilation of Record Keeping Plans. These plans are required by every government organisation covered by the Act. They contain information about record keeping processes, documentation and systems, planned or in place — including provisions for the retention periods and ultimate disposal actions for the records created and maintained by the organisation.

Section 32 of the Act provides for the transfer of State archives to the SRO, which is the custodian of the State archives collection — the largest and most significant archival collection in Western Australia. State archives are the significant records of government business which have ongoing evidential and cultural value. It is estimated that there are over 75 linear kilometres of paper-based State archives, as well as thousands of films and photographs, representing millions of individual records held across government.

The SRO holds some 15 linear kilometres of a selection of these permanent-value official records from over 2,000 government agencies that have existed since colonisation in 1829 in the State Archives Collection.

Workforce

DLGSC demographics at 30 June 2021.

Workforce demographics

TypeWomenMen
Total300194
DLGSC — Employment typeWomenMen
Permanent Full-time182155
Permanent Part-time484
Fixed Term Full-time4024
Fixed Term Part-time171
Casual paid55
Other85

Workforce diversity

DiversityNumberNumber of senior management rolesPercentage of women in management roles
Women in senior management roles295355%
DiversityNumberTotalPercentage of employees
Youth (employees under 25)134943%
Identify as an Aboriginal Australian94942%
Identify as people with disability164943%
Identify as culturally and linguistically diverse9049418%

Performance Management Framework

The DLGSC achieves its State Government desired outcomes through the delivery of five key services. While DLGSC contributes to all of the State Government’s Outcomes Based Service Delivery goals, its primary contribution is to the following government goals:

  • Better places: A quality environment with liveable and affordable communities and vibrant regions.
  • Strong communities: Safe communities and supported families.

The below table illustrates the relationship between DLGSC’s desired outcomes and the most relevant government goal. The DLGSC’s key effectiveness indicators help to determine whether DLGSC’s desired outcome has been achieved through service delivery. Key efficiency indicators monitor the relationship between the services delivered and the resources used to provide the service.

Government GoalDesired OutcomeService

Better Places

Local governments are supported to meet legislative requirements of the Local Government Act.Service 1 — Regulation and support of local government

Better Places

Strong communities

A sustainable arts and cultural sector that facilitates attendance and participation in arts and cultural activity.Service 2 — Cultural and Arts Industry Support
Better PlacesEfficient and effective asset and infrastructure support services to client agencies.Service 3 — Asset and infrastructure support services to client agencies*
Better PlacesGambling and liquor industries operate responsibly in accordance with legislation.Service 4 — Regulation of the Gambling and Liquor Industries
Better PlacesA strong sport and recreation sector that facilitates participation.Service 5 — Sport and recreation industry support

* Effectiveness and efficiency indicators are not reported for this outcome as it relates to the services provided by DLGSC to support the outcome and activities of the client agencies. An exemption from the requirements of Treasurer’s Instruction 904(2)(iv) Key Performance Indicators, has been provided by the Under Treasurer.

Changes to the Outcome Based Management Framework

The DLGSC’s Outcome Based Management (OBM) Framework has undergone review and was implemented in 2020-21. The revised and improved framework represents a more meaningful reflection of the activities and performance of DLGSC. Consultation on the proposed changes occurred with the Department of Treasury, the Office of the Auditor General (OAG), and internally with all relevant business area personnel.

Several desired outcomes, services and key effectiveness and efficiency indicators were discontinued and replaced with indicators that allow stakeholders to better understand what services are being delivered and how DLGSC is tracking towards achieving the intended outcomes.

The following table lists discontinued desired outcomes and services (excluding outcomes and services delivered by cultural statutory authorities):

Desired OutcomeServices
Local Governments were capable and well-governed 
A sustainable arts and cultural sector that enhances social and economic wellbeingArts Industry Support Research, policy development, information and support
Efficient and effective services to the culture and arts portfolio and governmentCorporate and asset and infrastructure support to the culture and arts portfolio
To promote, monitor and enforce responsible and lawful gambling and liquor services in accordance with legislationLicensing — evaluation and determination of applicants Compliance Audits and inspections
A strong and diverse sport and recreation system in Western Australia that is accessible, encourages maximum participating and develops talentIndustry leadership and infrastructure development Building capacity and participation Recreation camps management
Western Australia was recognised as a vibrant and effective multicultural societyPromotion and support of multiculturalism

Outcomes and key effectiveness indicators

While DLGSC did not exist prior to 1 July 2017, comparative data has been disclosed from the former departments’ audited data. Where an indicator is new and cannot be back-casted, values have not been provided.

Desired outcomesKey effectiveness indicator2017-20182018-20192019-2020 Actual2020-2021 Target 2020-2021 Actual
Local Governments are supported to meet legislative requirements of the Local Government Act.Percentage of local governments where actions were taken in support of compliance with the legislative frameworkN/AN/AN/A40%22%
A sustainable arts and cultural sector that facilitates attendance and participation in arts and cultural activity.Ratio of Government funding to other income earned for funded arts and cultural organisations1:3.61:4.21:4.51:2.71:4.7
Percentage of Western Australians attending or participating in an arts and cultural activity78%82%74%41%73%
Percentage of stakeholders who report that the Office of Multicultural Interests had a positive impact on the promotion and support of multiculturalism89%94%90%80%94%
Gambling and liquor industries operate responsibly in accordance with legislation.Percentage of audit and inspections that comply with requirements and statutory criteria.97%97%98%95%96%
A strong sport and recreation sector that facilitates participation.5.1 Percentage of Western Australian participating in organised sport and active recreation57%60%63%56%64%

Services and key efficiency indicators

While DLGSC did not exist prior to 1 July 2017, comparative data has been disclosed from the former departments’ audited data. Where an indicator is new and cannot be back-casted, values have not been provided.

Delivered ServicesEfficiency indicator2017-182018-192019-202020-21
Target
2020-21
Actual
1. Regulation and Support of Local GovernmentAverage cost per local government for regulation and support$98,803$76,743$99,975$109,051$74,655
2. Cultural and Arts industry supportGrants operations expense as a percentage of direct grants approvedN/AN/AN/A4%5%
Average cost per project to support and promote multiculturalism$110,916$87,974$90,958$92,816$102,618
4. Regulation of the gambling and liquor industriesAverage cost of conducting inspections$759$804$680$1,017$938
Average cost of determining applications$476$490$437$509$413
5. Sport and recreation industry supportAverage cost of providing support services to sector/ funded organisationsN/AN/A N/A$9,378$7,712
Grants operations expense as a percentage of direct grants approvedN/AN/A N/A1%1%
Average Cost per recreation camp experienceN/AN/A N/A$73$42

Shared responsibilities

The DLGSC works closely with a range of government agencies, across all tiers of government, industry partners and non-government organisations to achieve State Government outcomes that will benefit the Western Australian community.

Culture and the Arts

In partnership with the Australian Government through the Australia Council for the Arts, DLGSC funds four National Performing Arts Partnership Framework companies (formerly Major Performing Arts companies) in Western Australia. They are funded through a joint agreement negotiated between the Australian, state and territory governments. Through the framework jurisdictions continue to work together to deliver significant outcomes for the performing arts sector. In addition, through the Visual Arts and Crafts Strategy, the Australia Council for the Arts and DLGSC jointly support the contemporary visual arts sector by providing directed funding for individual artists, arts and craft organisations, arts events and artist run initiatives. 

In partnership with the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development, DLGSC delivers several Royalties for Regions funded programs. These programs included the Regional Arts and Cultural Investment Program and the Regional Exhibition Touring Boost, both of which support arts and cultural activities within regional WA. The DLGSC administers the Royalties for Regions funded Western Australian Screen Fund.

Infrastructure

The infrastructure business area works jointly with agencies, cultural statutory authorities, local governments and state sporting associations to deliver sporting and cultural infrastructure facilities and services.

These include:

  • the provision of strategic leadership, planning and funding support for strategic infrastructure and asset maintenance services to cultural statutory authorities;
  • supporting local governments and state sporting associations to plan and deliver cultural, and sport and recreational facilities, long term strategic planning for state scale infrastructure and the provision of funding support for those purposes;
  • working with the Department of Finance to plan and deliver sporting and cultural infrastructure projects and, through the maintenance services arrangement, the provision of maintenance services to cultural statutory authorities; and
  • working with the Department of Planning, Lands and Heritage in land use planning.

Local Government

In 2020-21 DLGSC continued to contribute to the whole-of-government development of reforms that respond to the recommendations of the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse. These reforms will result in state-wide policies and initiatives regarding child safeguarding, information sharing and reporting to better protect children and addressing past abuse.

Office of Multicultural Interests

The Office of Multicultural Interests (OMI) is a member of the Senior Officials Settlement Outcomes Group (SOSOG) convened and chaired by the Department of Home Affairs.

It comprises senior officials from relevant Commonwealth, State and Territory Governments, and the Australian Local Government Association. SOSOG is the primary mechanism to raise and address critical policy and program issues relating to immigration and multicultural affairs. Key issues addressed in 2021 —22 included government responses to the COVID-19 crisis, particularly in the areas of housing, health, education and employment; preparedness for the opening of international borders; and planned humanitarian arrivals, including quarantine arrangements on arrival.

Sport and Recreation

In partnership with Healthway, DLGSC delivers the Targeted Participation Program which enables organisations to promote participation, healthy lifestyles and the active engagement of Western Australian communities in sport and recreation. It has a focus on low participation groups, such as aboriginal and culturally and linguistically diverse populations. The 2020-21 round was deferred to allow 2019 —20 recipients an additional 12 months to deliver their programs due to COVID-19.

Together, Healthway and DLGSC also delivered the Innovation Challenge Program. Organisations proposed innovative ways to increase physical participation in the community through technology or other innovative models. Ten organisations received more than $840,000 ($590,000 from Healthway and $250,000 from DLGSC).

The DLGSC and the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development confirmed the continuation of the Regional Athlete Support Program for 2020-21 to 2022-23. This program will provide more than $3 million across the three years to provide funding assistance to regional sporting academies as well as direct funding assistance to regional athletes through the Regional Athlete Travel Subsidy.

Resource agreement

The Resource Agreement articulates DLGSC’s desired outcomes (both financial and non-financial) and performance targets as stated in the Budget Papers and is consistent with the broader strategic policy direction and priorities of the government. The DLGSC’s Resource Agreement is signed by the Accountable Authority, the Treasurer, and the following responsible Ministers under Part 3, Division 5 of the Financial Management Act 2006:

  • Minister for Local Government
  • Minister for Culture and the Arts
  • Minister for Racing and Gaming
  • Minister for Sport and Recreation; Citizenship and Multicultural Interests.

The targets identified in the Resource Agreement relate only to DLGSC. The targets published in the Budget Papers for the culture and the arts statutory authorities are subject to separate resource agreements.

COVID-19 recovery

Culture and the Arts

Getting the Show Back on the Road

Getting the Show Back on the Road Program (the Program) is part of the $76 million State Government Recovery Plan for culture and the arts. It is a risk share program aimed at supporting the live performance industry. The live performance industry was the first and hardest hit as COVID restrictions were put in place across the state. 

The Program was developed to mitigate some of the risks and to provide a percentage of box office loss for live events when there is a negative impact due to COVID-19 restrictions. The Program eases the financial risks for event organisers and provides some certainty by sharing the risk in undertaking activities within the current COVID-19 environment.

Since November 2020, 149 performing arts and live music events have applied for support. Only three applications were unsuccessful and collectively the projected box office is over $30 million with claims made to the value of $4.6 million. The Program has been instrumental to the continued delivery of the Perth Festival, the FRINGE WORLD Festival and a number of independent large-scale events. Without the surety of the Program these events may not have gone ahead.

Lotterywest Creative Communities COVID Recovery Program

Supported by Lotterywest and delivered by DLGSC, the $5 million Creative Communities COVID Recovery Program (the Program) aim is to utilise arts and culture as a catalyst for COVID-19 impact recovery for communities across the State.

The Program provides funding for artist-in-residence projects that engage communities and are delivered in partnership with artists and either a local government authority, local school, not-for-profit community organisations or not-for-profit community services organisations. It prioritises projects that engage children and their families, and young people in communities who are experiencing high levels of social, health and/or economic impacts due to COVID-19, have limited or low access to arts and cultural programs, are located in regional or remote Western Australia or reflect the diversity of the State.

The program opened on 1 September 2020 and DLGSC has funded 28 applications for just over $1.3 million.

Regional Arts Resilience Grants

In response to the impacts of COVID-19 on the regional arts and culture sector, the Regional Arts Resilience Grants Program was developed to support creative development, community engagement and capacity-building projects in regional WA. Delivered by Regional Arts WA it offered grants of up to $15,000 to regional artists, cultural practitioners, and arts and cultural organisations. Five funding rounds ran between July to December 2020, providing a total of 67 grants to artists and arts organisations across regional WA. It is estimated that over 74,000 participants and audiences were impacted by the investment as over 165 artists worked with their communities to develop creative solutions to restore confidence in towns, reduce isolation with residents, and future proof arts and cultural practice.

Public Regional Gallery Relief Fund

Administered by Art on the Move (AOTM), the Public Regional Gallery Relief Fund provided funding to public galleries impacted by COVID-19 restrictions. A total amount of $179,666 was allocated between the Collie Art Gallery, Geraldton Regional Art Gallery, Tantabiddi Art Gallery, Katanning Public Art Gallery, Bunbury Regional Art Gallery, Goldfields Art Centre and Albany Town Hall. The fund enabled public regional galleries to undertake activities to support recovery such as the resuming of business activity or improvements to soft and physical infrastructure.

Selling WA to the World

This initiative is designed to improve the capability for performing arts companies to Live Stream / Record performances for consumption anywhere in WA or the world. The Perth Theatre Trust has been completing procurement of the equipment needed to Live Stream and Record, both within and outside their venues.

Small Business Development Corporation — Land Tax Assistance

In April 2020, DLGSC stepped up to assist the Small Business Development Corporation (SBDC) with the Land Tax Assistance for Landlords program. It was a great example of two agencies working together to deliver a Government COVID-19 support program, with DLGSC bringing its expertise in grants management with SBDC’s expert knowledge of the small business sector. The program provided funding to landlords who waived a commercial tenant’s rent. The program received 633 applications, 502 of which were approved for a total of just under $2.5 million in support provided. While Culture and the Arts was the lead, staff from across DLGSC were co-opted into assessing the applications, with a new grant portal being established in record time, which was created by the Digital and Technology Services team.

Infrastructure

The Infrastructure business area is leading the delivery of two capital projects (valued at $45 million), 17 funding agreements (valued at $129 million) and a number business cases funded through the $5.5 billion WA Recovery Plan.

Further information on these projects is detailed under agency performance.

Local Government

Local governments are playing an important role in the recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly in the reconnection of their communities. The State Government is working closely with local governments to support alignment with the WA Recovery Plan.

In 2020-21, DLGSC continued to support local governments and the community to manage the ongoing impact of COVID-19, with a focus on practical assistance with local government operational requirements and support for social and economic recovery.

The Local Government Amendment (COVID-19 Response) Act 2020 provides for the Minister to modify or suspend provisions of the Act or Regulations due to consequences of the pandemic. During 2020-21, amendments were made to the Local Government (COVID-19 Response) Order 2020 to enable local governments to hold electors’ general and special meetings and continue to provide assistance to Western Australian ratepayers suffering financial hardship as a result of the pandemic.

Office of Multicultural Interests

Community Capital Works Fund

The Community Capital Works Fund program was announced in October 2020 as part of the State Government’s COVID-19 recovery initiative to stimulate the economy and create immediate opportunities for local businesses in the building and construction sector. The program was delivered as a one-off competitive grant opportunity providing up to $250,000 funding to CaLD communities in Western Australia to carry out capital works projects to improve their existing facilities and enhance services to the community. Total funding of $3 million was approved to support 28 projects.

Indian COVID-19 Crisis Relief Fund

On 4 May 2021, the Premier announced an allocation of $2 million in relief funding to support those directly impacted by the COVID-19 crisis in India. Administered as a grant program by OMI, the fund was open to Western Australian Indian community associations working in partnership with a registered Australian charity organisation already delivering COVID-19 crisis relief on-the-ground in India directly or through an affiliate organisation in India. The funding supported 12 organisations to deliver crisis relief activities in India such as the disbursement of medical equipment and consumables to hospitals and COVID-19 care centres, the delivery of community outreach and in-home care activities, and the supply of food relief to residents in regional or remote areas.

CaLD small business initiatives

In August 2020, in response to the impacts of COVID-19 on small businesses, OMI delivered a capacity building digital marketing workshop for culturally and linguistically diverse small business owners. Pursuant to this, OMI commissioned research to better understand the scope, challenges and other characteristics of CaLD owned small business in Western Australia. Making up almost 16% of Western Australian small businesses, the research found that CaLD business owners are making significant contributions in the business sector, creating jobs and niche markets, and diversifying the economy.

Community engagement

The OMI continued its engagement with community leaders, WA Police and the Australian Government Department of Home Affairs to identify and address issues arising from the advent of COVID-19 including instances of racial harassment.

OMI continued its engagement and communications with CaLD and faith communities to ensure that they could access WA specific COVID-19 information, understand physical distancing requirements and to identify opportunities to improve communication between government and CaLD communities. This included a Pacific Island Communities Network Forum, that provided an opportunity for representatives collectively discuss areas where support was required and to link with government agencies.

Also in April, OMI joined representatives from other DLGSC service areas to undertake initial consultations on Christmas Island and the Cocos Keeling Islands to inform development of a new Service Delivery Agreement with the Commonwealth Government. Key issues raised by communities included the impact of COVID-19 on the islands which has resulted in increased domestic tourism and impacted the delivery of essential services.

In May 2021, in partnership with the Departments of Health and Premier and Cabinet, OMI delivered online and face-to-face training sessions for CaLD community leaders to address misinformation and promote uptake of the COVID-19 vaccine. The sessions were well received, with 92% of attendees planning to run similar sessions for their communities.

Racing, Gaming and Liquor

The DLGSC issued 6788 occasional licences to 652 licensed premises to allow the sale of a limited amount of packaged liquor with a meal for takeaway or delivery. The occasional license application form was streamlined and no fees were payable, in recognition of the difficulties being experienced by businesses. Issuing these occasional licenses enabled licensees to ‘sell off’ excess stock that would otherwise have been written off due to the onset of snap lockdowns.

The DLGSC issued 20 Extended Trading Permits to increase the licensed area for existing premises to assist them with managing physical distancing restrictions, whilst maximising the number of patrons allowed on the premises. Again, the application form was streamlined and no fees were payable.

To support licensees through the impacts of the COVID 19 pandemic and to further assist them in the recovery, the Director of Liquor Licensing:

  • Issued 6788 occasional licences to 652 licensed¬ premises to allow the sale of a limited amount of packaged liquor with a meal for takeaway or delivery. The application form was streamlined and no fees were payable in recognition of the difficulties being experienced by businesses.
  • Issued occasional licences to enable licensees to ‘sell off’ excess stock, or stock nearing its used-by-date instead of it being disposed of.
  • Issued 20 Extended Trading Permits to increase the licensed area for existing premises to assist them with managing the physical distancing restrictions whilst maximising the number of patrons allowed on the premises. The application form and process were streamlined and no fees were payable in recognition of the difficulties being experienced by businesses.
  • Approved applications to vary existing licence conditions to free up some restrictions and/or to reduce the overheads associated with operating the business. E.g., amending the crowd controller requirements to reduce the number of crowd controllers required on licensed premises in acknowledgement of the reduced capacity that venues were permitted.
  • Refunded licensees $2,702,160 worth of 2020 annual liquor licence fees; and application fees for events that were cancelled due to COVID.

Sport and Recreation

The DLGSC continued to implement the Back to Sport program funded by Lotterywest, which added $4 million to the KidSport program to enable an additional 24,500 children to access financial support to return to sport. A $500 subsidy to KidSport clubs was also available to assist in the re-engagement of participants and volunteers.

The State Government also delivered the Sport Development Fund program, administered by DLGSC. This program provided funding of up to $40,000 for small to medium state sporting associations — which are predominantly managed by volunteers — to assist in staff appointments to run programs increasing participation or improving governance.

The DLGSC supported industry leaders and organisations through the provision of information, guidance and advice on COVID-19 in relation to sport and recreation activities, including State, National and International touring teams. Officers liaised with multiple external decision makers on sport and recreation relevant restrictions, including the Department of Premier and Cabinet, Department of Health and WA Police.

Corporate Services

The DLGSC worked closely with the Department of Premier and Cabinet and the Pandemic Coordination Unit (PCU) regarding whole of government planning, coordination, communication and reporting. Several department staff were also seconded to the SPCC to provide further support.

The DLGSC implemented a number of strategies to support employees and the work of DLGSC including:

  • Continual implementation of its pandemic plan to ensure continuity of services, reduced risk to staff and stakeholders, and protection of vulnerable workers.
  • Protecting people in frontline roles by following Department of Health guidelines around social distancing within the workplace and ensuring all cleaning was performed in accordance with COVID-19 Environmental Cleaning for Workplaces guidance produced by the WA Department of Health.
  • Finalising and introducing flexible working from home policy, procedures and assessment.
  • Contributed to whole of government reporting on COVID —19 impact within DLGSC and on stocks of health supplies.
  • Further developed remote working capability through continual deployment of multi factor authentication and windows virtual desktop and the provision of ICT equipment such as surfaces, laptops and monitors which enabled the successful ability for staff to work from home during the lockdown, as required by government directives. During the lockdown 31 January to 5 February 2021, approx. 97% of staff, not on leave, were able to remain home and work.

Agency performance

Service 1. Regulation and support of local government

Key achievements

Local Government Act Reform

Following consultation with community and sector stakeholders, and the passage of the Local Government Legislation Amendment Act 2019, further reforms were implemented in 2020-21 to support behaviour and corporate practices that reflect community expectations of individuals in publicly funded roles:

  • Ethics and accountability — mandatory code of conduct for elected members, committee members and candidates, and a separate code of conduct for local government employees
  • Best practice and procedural fairness — standards for Chief Executive Officer recruitment, performance review and early termination

Between August and September 2020, a Local Government Act Review Panel appointed by the then Minister for Local Government, the independent City of Perth Inquiry and a Parliamentary Select Committee Inquiry into Local Government each provided a report and recommendations in relation to local government in WA. These reports and further input from stakeholders will inform future reforms for local government.

In preparation for the 2021 Ordinary Elections across WA, the mandatory induction course for prospective candidates was fully revised and updated with new and additional information, including a summary of the reforms regarding codes of conduct and CEO standards. It is anticipated that the revised course will better assist individuals who may nominate as a candidate in a local election, and then be subsequently elected to represent their community as a council member.

Stop Puppy Farming

Following extensive consultation, the Dog Amendment (Stop Puppy Farming) Bill 2020 (Bill) was introduced to Parliament in 2020 but was not passed before the Parliament was prorogued in December 2020 ahead of the State election in March 2021. Following the re-election of the McGowan Government, the Bill was re-introduced into the Legislative Assembly on 2 June 2021 and will be debated in the second half of 2021. Following the development of the supporting regulations, and the establishment of a centralised registration system for cats and dogs, the provisions of the Bill will be proclaimed.

Cemeteries and Cremation Acts Review

In September 2020, the Minister for Health and the then Minister for Local Government announced a review of the Cemeteries Act 1986 and the Cremation Act 1929 (Review), with the aim of contributing to legislative reform that is responsive to community expectations and industry needs; and provides effective regulatory oversight of the interment sector in Western Australia.

The Review is being undertaken by DLGSC on behalf of the Minister for Local Government. Targeted engagement with key stakeholders, including industry focus groups, has commenced. The outputs of this consultation will inform a discussion paper for public comment, which is anticipated to be released in the second half of 2021.

Support for Local Government

The DLGSC works closely with the sector on developing projects and programs which enable local governments to improve their processes and service delivery to the community.

In 2020-21, DLGSC met a key recommendation of the Office of the Auditor General in developing a risk analysis tool designed to identify local governments that could benefit from proactive intervention and support to fulfill their statutory obligations. This tool is being considered for implementation in 2021-22.

In 2020-21, DLGSC continued to support the Peer Support Program into regional local government areas. The program is a collaborative effort between DLGSC, Local Government Professionals WA and Local Government Integrated Planners Network.

The purpose of the program is to facilitate meaningful peer support to participating local governments to help improve the content and performance of their Integrated Planning and Reporting framework through regional collaboration and resource sharing. The program has been widely promoted with interest from across the State. As part of the program and in response to COVID-19 a Community Resilience Scorecard was developed.

The project has been funded by DLGSC with pro bono contributions from CATALYSE®, Local Government Professionals WA and local governments across Western Australia were invited to participate. The Scorecard was a state-wide collaboration to map community wellbeing, evaluate local government performance in response to COVID-19. The scorecard reached over 7600 West Australian residents over the age of 18 years old from 128 local governments, with results launched in August 2020 via webinar. The final report was dis-aggregated into ten Regional Development Commissions reports and provided a valuable place-based social lens of how the community is coping with current challenges and what they would like their local government to focus on.

The DLGSC also works with Local Government Professionals WA in a CEO Support Program that assists Local Government CEOs to be better equipped to deal with the challenges currently facing the sector.

Evaluation Framework and Toolkit for Community Development Services in local government

The DLGSC supported a project, in partnership with the University of Western Australia’s Centre for Social Impact and Local Government Professionals - Community Development Network, to develop an evaluation framework and toolkit for community development services in Western Australian local government.

Local Government Making a Difference Award 2020

The Western Australian Regional Achievement and Community Awards are designed to encourage, acknowledge, and reward the valuable contributions individuals, communities and businesses are making throughout regional and rural Western Australia.

In 2020 DLGSC funded the Local Government-Making a Difference Award for the second time to recognise outstanding regional local governments working to get positive outcomes for the community, to acknowledge the tremendous contribution of local government in regional WA. The winner was Bindoon Library, a community hub in the Shire of Chittering, providing entertainment, education, support and information for its community of just more than 1000 people. Since 2016 the Bindoon Library has run activities, workshops and seminars around a series of theme months, driving up visits by 200%. The award recognises the Bindoon Library for its multiple collaborative efforts and adapting to continue its services during COVID-19 restrictions. All activities are free and aim to promote library services, activate the library space and build community connectivity. During COVID-19, they introduced a pick-up service for loans and took activities online.

Women in local government

The DLGSC supports the Australian Local Government Women’s Association WA Branch to continue to run two programs, Standing Up, to increase numbers of women nominating for council and MentorNet, to build the capacity and capabilities of women currently elected to council. Standing Up develops women’s networks with current elected members. It also provides campaign support and advice for women who decide to nominate. MentorNet, develops networks for women, to better inform female councillors’ roles. Mentors come from large and small local governments, both country and metropolitan, and have a wide variety of interests and experience. It also enables women to engage in development opportunities.

Hand Ups Successful Participation in Local Government Decision-Making

The DLGSC continues to fund research by the University of Western Australia and WALGA that establishes benchmark data about elected members in local government in Western Australia, following the 2019 Local Government Elections. The research will also determine the motivations to stand for new elected members and re-nominating members, which will allow trends to be monitored. COVID-19 has had some impacts on the project through disruption to UWA’s operations and state-wide travel restrictions in 2020.

The project will collect longitudinal data over a four-year period.

Service 2. Cultural and Arts industry support

Key achievements — Culture and the Arts

In 2020-21 DLGSC distributed $48.3 million in funding to bring a vibrant mix of arts and culture to Western Australian audiences. This included $16.4 million to non-government organisations, $5.6 million to individuals, groups and organisations through arts project grants, $3.9 million through arts initiatives, $6.9 million for Arts COVID recovery programs, $8.5 million in Royalties for Regions (RfR) funding distributed through the Regional Arts and Culture Investment Program grants programs and the Regional Exhibition Touring Boost, $3.1 million to Screenwest, and $4 million in the RfR WA Screen Fund. 

Regional Arts and Cultural Investment Program (RACIP)

The RACIP will deliver almost $20 million over four years to regional WA. Through strategic investments, it will build capacity in the regions and contribute to liveability and vibrancy of regional communities. The program delivers support to a range of regional arts and cultural activity and the second stage of the four-year program was rolled out in 2020-2021.

Seven RACIP grants programs administered by DLGSC were delivered in 2020-2021. Playing WA, In the House and Made in WA supported the touring, presentation and development of performing arts in the regions. The Aboriginal Arts Commissioning Fund provided opportunities for Aboriginal artists to share stories through the development of new, large scale work. The Regional and Remote Festivals Fund supported regional festivals and contributed to cultural tourism in the regions. 35 grants were awarded across the seven programs, totalling over $5.35 million in support.

As part of the establishment of RACIP’s Community Participation and Inclusion Program, DADAA and the Centre for Stories will share in $159,000 of funding for pilot projects to deliver arts and cultural activities with people from diverse backgrounds in regional WA.

RACIP key delivery partners include Regional Arts WA (RAWA), CircuitWest and the Aboriginal Art Centre Hub of WA (AACHWA). RAWA delivered the Regional Arts Empowerment and Employment Grants ensuring the continuity of grant funding for regional organisations and individuals delivering arts and cultural activities in their communities and the Next Level program which supports the creative and professional development for young emerging artists and arts workers based in regional WA. The state’s regional performing arts and entertainment centres were supported through business development and capacity building by CircuitWest. AACHWA delivered a program of business development to support Aboriginal arts centres including arts worker training.

Regional Exhibition Touring Boost (RETB)

Funded through Royalties for Regions, the RETB increases the number of visual arts touring exhibitions in the regions, regional access to the State Art Collection and opportunities for regional artists and public galleries. RETB is delivered in conjunction with key delivery partners ART ON THE MOVE (AOTM) and the Art Gallery of Western Australia (AGWA). Despite the impacts of COVID-19, the program has delivered several exhibitions, programs, and tours in 2020-2021.

Exhibition tour one - How Did I Get Here? concluded in late 2020, touring to the East Pilbara Art Centre and Carnarvon Library and Gallery. There Were Moments of Transformation, the second tour featuring 40 works from the State Art Collection, launched at Ningaloo Centre on 26 September 2020, and travelled to Goldfields Art Centre, Katanning Art Gallery, Collie Art Gallery and Geraldton Regional Art Gallery. Exhibition three- Peregrinations of a Citizen Botanist by artist Suzie Vickery is in production, launching in Esperance in late 2021. Exhibition four- The Alternative Archive launched at John Curtin Gallery (JCG) in May 2021 featuring over 40 regional artworks, with regional touring commencing next financial year. Planning and pre-production for the AGWA/Form partnership, Aboriginal Pilbara Survey commenced in 2020-21. In 2020-21 the RETB has also delivered employment and training opportunities for regional exhibition guides, and intensive skills development and networking opportunities for regional curators and arts workers.

Contemporary Music Fund (CMF)

The State Government continued its commitment to the Contemporary Music Fund (CMF) to support the contemporary music industry in WA. The CMF Grant Program provided total funding of $589,970 to 42 successful applicants in the U15K and 15K+ categories, with funding going towards recording of music, business development, promotion, professional development and mentoring. As part of the CMF Targeted Initiatives, a total of $150,000 in support was provided to Stompem Ground for a Broome Festival in late 2021 and to GirlsRock! Camps (WAM) to empower aspiring young female, trans and non-binary musicians and music professionals in the WA music industry. As part of the CMF Targeted Initiatives, support was provided to Safer Venues WA to prevent gender and sexually-based violence and harassment in music venues, to the Kimberley Stolen Generation for the Stompem Ground Festival to be delivered in late 2021, and to West Australian Music (WAM) for the GirlsRock! program to empower young female and non-binary musicians and the WAM Regional Recording Programs.

Revealed

The annual Revealed suite of programs were successfully delivered by the Fremantle Art Centre in 2021. This included the Revealed Exhibition, Aboriginal Art Market, Aboriginal Artsworker placement, Professional Development Program and Symposium. The Exhibition presented the works of 101 new and emerging WA Aboriginal Artists with 282 contemporary artworks exhibited spanning a huge range of styles and mediums including painting, weavings, textiles, photography, print media, neon, carving and sculptures. This year’s Revealed Exhibition included the participation of 32 remote and regional Aboriginal Art Centres, in addition to the highest number of independent artists in the program’s history. The Art Market was delivered online following the events cancellation due to COVID-19 in 2020. Sales generated across the Exhibition and Art Market totalled $526,828, with sales including national and international buyers.

Connecting to Country Program

In 2020-21, DLGSC delivered the first of three years funding for the Connecting to Country Program. Connecting to Country supports projects that enable Western Australian Aboriginal people, communities and organisations to undertake on-Country trips that foster the intergenerational transfer of knowledge, preservation of culture and strengthening of communities. The program has proven to be successful in providing Aboriginal communities with autonomy to develop and lead initiatives that support the sustainability and maintenance of their culture. Of the twenty projects funded across the State in 2020-21, the majority describe Aboriginal Elders, youth and families coming together on-Country, some after many years away or without access to country, to participate in cultural camps. Through visits to significant sites, storytelling, dancing, song, traditional language, lore, exploring of traditional uses for plants, bush tucker and art, Elders as cultural knowledge holders have the opportunity to connect the next generation of cultural custodians and leaders to their country and culture by walking alongside them and teaching with on-Country resources supporting on country healing.

Virtual Reality Festival

The second edition of the Virtual Reality Festival election commitment, titled XR:WA took place in December 2020. The festival was rescheduled, and the delivery model was modified to adapt to COVID-19 restrictions. The 2020 festival featured 54 local, national and international speakers in person and online who represented a blend of business, industry, education, training, science, research, art, entertainment, social justice, funding and trade. The move toward providing a free event across five venues in the Perth Cultural Centre was a major asset in facilitating casual and passing attendance. The festival format includes a two-day conference and two-day showcase exhibition of over 50 exhibits.

This format shows markets in the educational, industrial, domestic and art and entertainment areas. In 2020 the commissioning of four experimental Virtual Reality short films ‘FourByFour’, generated direct economic and industry employment of more than 50 arts professionals.

COVID-19 Audience Outlook Monitor

In 2020 the Audience Outlook Monitor commenced as a COVID related tracking study of audience sentiments during the pandemic in an Australian-first partnership between seven government agencies that includes DLGSC, and two research organisations Patternmakers (Sydney) and WolfBrown (USA).

The Audience Outlook Monitor was conducted bi-monthly during May, July and September 2020. The survey has been extended to continue in 2021 due to the ongoing impact of the pandemic on the arts and culture sector. A national report is produced at each phase followed by a State report.

In 2021 there are 11 Western Australian arts organisations and venues who have joined the study, including the National Performing Arts Partnership organisations, Arts Organisations Investment Program recipients, small to medium arts organisations and performing arts venues across the metropolitan and regional areas.

The COVID-19 Audience Outlook Monitor aggregates survey data in a freely available dashboard, to assist artists and cultural organisations of all kinds to inform decision making about planning and programming live events by understanding how audiences feel about attending arts and culture events again.

Western Australian Cultural Infrastructure Framework 2030+

The WA Cultural Infrastructure Framework 2030+, Western Australia's first ever roadmap for holistic cultural infrastructure planning and investment in the State, was released in December 2020. The framework outlines the principles for how considered planning of cultural infrastructure can drive participation in arts, culture and creative activities for all Western Australians, showcasing WA to the world.

Cultural infrastructure refers to physical infrastructure such as venues, collections and digital technology, but also includes the staff, volunteers and digital networks required to operate these spaces.

The framework was developed through extensive stakeholder consultation, a review of cultural planning practices and sustainable development goals from around the world. It also considered State planning frameworks and policy priorities such as Diversify WA.

It forms part of the Cultural Infrastructure Toolkit - a suite of resources that will assist decision makers to assess the cultural infrastructure needs and opportunities to support the State's growing population and economy. The toolkit includes:

  • WA Cultural Infrastructure Framework 2030+ Summary:  outlines a roadmap for holistic cultural infrastructure planning and investment in the State until 2030 and beyond.
  • WA Cultural Infrastructure Framework 2030+: more detail on how the Framework can increase participation in arts, culture and creative activities for all Western Australians and showcase the State to the world.
  • WA Cultural Infrastructure Investment Guidelines:  identifies outcomes for investing in cultural infrastructure, and can be used as a tool for robust, evidence-based assessment of cultural infrastructure proposals.
  • WA Cultural Infrastructure Map: displays the State’s existing cultural infrastructure and can be used for future planning to grow WA’s cultural engagement and creative economy. 
  • These resources enable a holistic approach for all stakeholders, including State, local and Commonwealth governments, the creative and cultural sector, private investors and the community.
Australian cultural & creative activity: A population & hotspot analysis

The aim of the research project is to investigate factors producing local and regional creative ‘hotspots’, which have well above average creative and innovative growth and potential. The project’s hotspot reports are informed by statistical summaries drawn from a diverse range of data sources including the Australian Census, the Australian Business Register, IP Australia registration data, infrastructure availability lists and creative grants and rights payments.

Lead researchers from the project travelled to four of WA’s creative hotspots: Geraldton, Busselton, Albany-Denmark and Fremantle to undertake interviews with local representatives from the creative industries. The Geraldton, Fremantle and Busselton reports have been published and the Albany-Denmark report is forthcoming.

This is an Australia Research Council Linkage project led by the Digital Media Research Centre at the Queensland University of Technology. The DLGSC is a partner organisation, along with Arts Queensland, Creative Victoria, Arts NSW, and Arts SA. 

Key achievements — Aboriginal History WA

Aboriginal History Research Services (AHRS)

During the 2020-21 financial year, AHRS provided comprehensive responses to 322 Family History applications, 27 native title queries, 17 general research applications, 34 confirmation of birth requests, 17 Freedom of Information applications and 3 requests from the public trustee. The area also responded to 409 requests relating to Redress. AHRS responded to 829 requests in total. 39% of the total number of completed responses related to Family History applications and 51% of the total completed responses related to Redress (including Freedom of Information) requests. AHRS has responded to 5% of all applications received by the National Redress Scheme since it was established.

Wadjemup, the Land beyond the Shore

The DLGSC has completed a research project dedicated to the history of incarceration on Wadjemup (Rottnest Island). The project focuses on the period 1900 to the closure of the prison in 1931, with detailed information about the 391 Aboriginal prisoners (boys, men, and a woman) who were sent to the island during this time.

Hundreds of historical records have been examined to produce a comprehensive resource that is accessible through a culturally secure online database. Information about each person’s ancestral linkage, date and place of birth and death, as well as details on their time spent on Wadjemup and their lives after their release has been included. Never before seen photographs are also available. The project was undertaken in consultation with descendants of the prisoners as well as relevant State Government agencies, Prescribed Bodies Corporate, the Rottnest Island Authority, key Aboriginal organisations, and other statutory bodies. This is a significant resource for Aboriginal people seeking to establish family connections to the former prison and more broadly adds to the historical archive of Western Australia.

Historical Agricultural and Pastoral Leases: Applications by Aboriginal People throughout Western Australia 1887-1933

A unique project acknowledging the part that Aboriginal farmers and their families have played in the agricultural development of Western Australia has been completed. The land lease database identifies more than 440 leases and is searchable by name, location, and application type and will be available on DLGSC website. Mapping software identifies the original blocks of land and includes a visual of the lease locations. Thousands of historical documents have been reviewed and discussions held with descendants to gather the data. The project will assist Aboriginal people to re-establish links to family through archival and genealogical research as well as providing an in-depth understanding of the shared history of Western Australia.

Mount Margaret Mission Child Crayon Drawings: 100 Years On

The year 2021 marks the centenary of the establishment of the Mount Margaret Mission, a site of great historical importance to Aboriginal people throughout the Goldfields region - many of whom have continuing family connections to the area. For over half a century, between 1921-1975, Aboriginal children were sent to live in Mount Margaret Mission.

Some were admitted under government policies that sought to remove Aboriginal children from their families and communities. Other children were placed in the Mission by their families due to the disadvantage that they faced. There were also people who chose to live at Mount Margaret where their children attended the school. To acknowledge this significant milestone and important part of our history, DLGSC has consulted with the Mount Margaret community to publish a commemorative book featuring unseen crayon drawings from 29 children who were attending the school in 1939.

Improving access to records - Indexing of AHWA records

AHWA is undertaking the ongoing systematic indexing of the contents and listings of historic records to continue to improve efficiency of internal operations and to increase access to information within departmental files.

  • 300 family history files were created, indexed, and digitised to improve the efficiency of responding to applications. Each file contains important records that relate to ancestral information of Aboriginal families in Western Australia.
  • An index of archival records managed by AHWA relating to Aboriginal Missions and institutions in WA has been completed.
  • A digital research index of all Aboriginal Personal History Cards is being produced and will assist in reducing response time.
Community engagement - AHWA Metropolitan and regional information sessions

The DLGSC partners with the Aboriginal community to provide information and assistance to access historical ancestral records. AHWA and the State Library of WA (SLWA) continue to provide regular joint family history information sessions in Perth and Bunbury. Information sessions included representatives from government and non-government agencies. Live streamed presentations have also been utilised to share information about the AHWA services. An open community session during Reconciliation Week (27 May — 3 June 2021) attracted nearly 200 participants.

Throughout the year, AHWA has linked with key Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal organisations, including the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS), South Australia Museum, National Archives of Australia, Yorgum Healing Services, Kimberley Stolen Generation Aboriginal Corporation, and Aboriginal language centres and art centres.

In November and December 2020, AHWA completed a series of community information sessions in 11 towns within the Goldfields, Wheatbelt, Southwest, Midwest, and Great Southern regions of Western Australia. The primary purpose was to engage with regional communities and provide details about AHWA services.

In June 2021, AHWA teams visited the Kimberley, Goldfields and Geraldton to work with the regional DLGSC team for a week to engage with Aboriginal communities. A series of information sessions were held in Kalgoorlie, Leonora, Laverton, Geraldton, Broome, Fitzroy Crossing and Derby. The sessions included participants from a broad range of disciplines and community groups. Following the session in Derby, the Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Service Council Board requested extra hard copies of the resources so that they can be distributed to all Aboriginal Medical Services in the region to assist with the implementation of their healing programs.

The information sessions were very well received and generated considerable interest in the services that AHWA provides.

A key focus of AHWA’s work is engagement with the Aboriginal community which includes home visits as required and with permission. Conversations detailed personal recollections of life, family and community experiences that share invaluable information and has added to the archives of the unit.

Key achievements - Office of Multicultural Interests

Western Australian Multicultural Awards 2021

Over 200 people from diverse communities and organisations attended the Western Australian Multicultural Awards 2021 night at the Optus Stadium on Thursday 18 March 2021. The awards were established to acknowledge and celebrate the achievements of Western Australians who have accomplished outstanding work in advancing multiculturalism. recognise outstanding contributions made by people and organisations who promote and strengthen WA’s multicultural community. The event was a main feature of Harmony Week 2021.

The 2020 Awards presentation was scheduled to take place in March 2020 but due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the event was postponed until 2021. High profile lawyer and human rights advocate Nyadol Nyuon provided the keynote address.

The eight categories recognised individuals, businesses, media, local governments and community service organisations. In addition, Russell Raymond OAM and Olga Ramasamy OAM, who passed away in 2019 and 2020, respectively, were recognised as two pioneers of multicultural services in WA. The Laksiri Jayasuriya Lifetime Achievement Award went to Ramdas Sankaran, OAM.

Western Australian Multicultural Policy Framework

Implementation of the Western Australian Multicultural Policy Framework (WAMPF) across the WA public sector saw agencies embrace the Framework. As at 30 June 2021, 49 WA public sector agencies had developed and submitted Multicultural Plans to the Minister for Citizenship and Multicultural Interests. Strategies, measures and key performance indicators identified in multicultural plans will ensure Western Australians from CaLD backgrounds have opportunities to access services and participate equitably in every aspect of our civic, social, economic and cultural life.

The Office of Multicultural Interests (OMI) is committed to engaging with agencies, providing advice in relation to multicultural plans as well as support for their implementation. A WAMPF community of practice was established to support agencies with their implementation efforts. The network highlights and encourages partnerships, provides information and shares models of positive work being done across the sector.

Western Australian Language Services Policy

The Western Australian Language Services Policy 2020 was officially released by the Minister of Citizenship and Multicultural Interests on 10 November 2020. The policy aims to ensure equitable access to Western Australian public sector services through the provision of language services.

The policy and new guidelines and fact sheets replace the 2014 edition and come with a range of easy-to-access information sheets. The policy was promoted through interagency networks, on social media and through the implementation of the Western Australian Multicultural Policy Framework as WA public agencies developed their multicultural plans.

Diverse WA update

OMI’s Diverse WA online cultural competency training program was updated with technical and content improvements. An online training portal hosted by DLGSC was established, and content updated to focus on raising cultural awareness, building intercultural understanding, and interpreting and translation services.

The new portal went live on 8 October 2020 and was extensively promoted across the WA public sector as part of workforce training/development. Since the update, there have been more than 1614 registered users from 126 registered agencies. The training completion rate has significantly increased from 43% to 99% for the cultural competency module and to more than 84% for the language services module.

Search Diversity WA

OMI’s Search Diversity WA online search facility detailing the demographic, cultural and socioeconomic data of Western Australians was updated with an additional 40 birthplaces, 16 languages, four ancestries and a Western Australian overview.

The website includes profiles of all WA electoral divisions and local government areas and now contains data for 86 birthplaces, 80 languages, 45 ancestries and 24 religions.

Service 3. Asset and infrastructure support services to client agencies

The DLGSC provides centralised infrastructure services and maintains State owned cultural infrastructure on behalf of the cultural statutory authorities.

The DLGSC also provides strategic policy, leadership and funding support to local government to promote and guide the development of sport and recreation infrastructure.

The DLGSC delivers the Community Sporting and Recreation Facilities Fund, State Sporting Infrastructure Fund and a range of infrastructure related election commitments.

Key achievements

WA Recovery Plan
Perth Concert Hall redevelopment
The $42 million Perth Concert Hall project has been allocated $30 million of State Government funding through the WA Recovery Plan and an additional $12 million in Australian Government funding through the Perth City Deal.

The DLGSC is working closely with the Perth Theatre Trust, West Australian Symphony Orchestra (WASO) and the Department of Finance to deliver the project.

The redevelopment of Perth Concert Hall will improve the functionality and operational performance of the State’s premier Concert Hall, activate the precinct, and provide a home for the WASO.

It is anticipated that the project will be completed in 2025.

His Majesty’s Theatre — Stage 3

Stage 3 of the redevelopment of His Majesty’s Theatre is a $15 million commitment towards the reconstruction of the heritage balconies.

His Majesty’s Theatre is included in the State Register of Heritage Places in recognition of its importance to the cultural fabric of Western Australia. In 2018, a proposal for extensive redevelopment and refurbishment works to conserve the theatre’s rich heritage fabric and maintain its reputation as a premium cultural venue was developed.

Stages 1 and 2 of the restoration works were carried out in 2018 and 2019. Stage 3 will reinstate the verandah and balconies to the building façade to match the original architectural features that were removed in 1953. Reconstruction of the heritage balconies will improve patron amenities and re-establish His Majesty’s as a cultural icon.

In April 2021, a contract for construction management services was awarded to Built through a competitive market process. The project is due to for completion in 2022.

State Football Centre

In June 2020, the State Government announced that it would match the Australian Government’s $16.25 million investment for the development of the State Football (Soccer) Centre at Queens Park Open Space in the City of Canning.

The State Football Centre will be a home for Football West’s day-to-day administration and include training facilities and playing fields to support grassroots, community and high-performance football programs.

The project will be delivered in two stages: forward works; and a main works package. Planning and environmental approvals were obtained in early 2021 and the forward works package was awarded in April 2021. The contractor took possession of the site in May 2021. The main works are scheduled to commence on site in early 2022.

The State Football Centre is scheduled for completion mid-2023, in time for the 2023 FIFA Women’s World Cup, enabling it to be used as a training and warm-up venue in support of the tournament.

Screen production facility

On 19 August 2020, to support the State’s COVID-19 recovery, the Minister for Culture and the Arts released a market-led proposal to invite proposals from the private sector to build, locate and operate a screen production facility in Western Australia.

As the lead (client) agency, DLGSC is working with the Department of Finance to deliver the market-led proposal.

Funding agreements

The DLGSC is responsible for funding agreements for the delivery of 16 sport and community infrastructure projects totaling $126.2 million. These projects, which will help drive WA’s economic and social recovery from the pandemic across Western Australia, are being managed through financial assistance agreements with the recipients.

The projects are listed below:

  • WACA ground redevelopment ($30 million)
  • Mundaring Kiernan Park recreation precinct ($20 million)
  • Alkimos swimming pool ($10 million)
  • Aqua Jetty (Stage 2) ($10 million)
  • Baldivis indoor recreation centre ($10 million)
  • Dalyellup multipurpose centre, including youth facility and library ($8 million)
  • Maccabi WA Inc Jewish community centre ($6 million)
  • Donnybrook and districts sporting and recreation precinct ($6 million)
  • Bunbury Hands Oval rebuild the pavilion ($5 million)
  • Lesmurdie Ray Owen reserve ($5 million)
  • Recreational camps revitalisation ($4.9 million)
  • Kununurra water playground ($3.2 million)
  • Landsdale youth hub ($3 million)
  • Kingsway regional sporting complex ($2.67 million)
  • Ellenbrook youth centre ($1.86 million)
  • Warradale community centre expansion ($0.6 million)
Additional funding for the State Sporting Infrastructure Fund

The State Sporting Infrastructure Fund baseline budget is $2 million each year. In 2020 2021, funding was increased by $2 million through the WA Recovery Plan.

These funds were allocated to delivery of eleven capital projects through financial assistance agreements with state sporting associations, and the development of three business cases.

Business case for the future service delivery requirements of the State Library of Western Australia

The need to identify and assess the current and future service delivery requirements of the State Library of Western Australia has arisen as a result of recent developments in how people access and apply information and the perceived limitations of the Alexander Library building.

In December 2020, the State Government approved WA Recovery Plan funding for the preparation of a business case to identify the future service delivery requirements of the State Library.

Development of the business case commenced in January 2021 and is due to be completed in late 2021.

Perth City Deal 1,2

Announced on 20 September 2020, the Perth City Deal is a $1.5 billion, ten-year partnership between the Australian Government, the State Government and the City of Perth. It aims to unlock economic benefits and opportunities for Perth’s central city, re-energise Perth and bring government and private investment into the CBD.

The DLGSC is leading the delivery of two Perth City Deal projects and one funding agreement.

1 Perth City Deal
2 Perth City Deal (PDF 4043 KB)

Perth Cultural Centre rejuvenation project

The Perth Cultural Centre rejuvenation project forms part of the $1.5 billion Perth City Deal announced in September 2020. The $20 million project consists of three distinct elements with interdependencies: masterplan; business case; and capital works.

The masterplan will deliver a holistic plan that binds the strategic intent and vision for the precinct consolidating and building on its role as the cultural heart of the city. Delivery of the masterplan element is being overseen by the Cultural Precinct Taskforce.

In conjunction with the masterplan, a business case will define the level of investment required, and options for delivery. It will ensure the project takes full advantage of opportunities to deliver the vision as they become available. Both the masterplan and business case are anticipated to be completed in the final quarter of 2021.

Included in the $20 million project is the initial upgrade (first stage) of the Perth Cultural Centre. This will improve the amenity, functionality and security of the precinct, focused towards increasing tourism and visitation numbers, which supports the diversification of the economy, creates jobs and develops business opportunities.

The scope of works to be delivered as part of the Stage 1 capital works package will be consistent with the long-term vision for the Perth Cultural Centre.

Works are anticipated to commence in 2022 and are scheduled for completion in 2024.

Perth Concert Hall redevelopment project

As noted above, the $42 million Perth Concert Hall project has $30 million through the WA Recovery Plan and an additional $12 million in Australian Government funding through the Perth City Deal.

It is anticipated that the project will be completed in 2025.

WACA ground redevelopment ($30 million)

Through the Perth City Deal, the Commonwealth and State Governments have committed $30 million each to the WACA ground redevelopment project. The State Government’s contribution is part of the WA Recovery Plan.

The DLGSC is providing technical advice to the WACA in relation to the design and delivery of the project.

Delivery of election commitments

The infrastructure business area is delivering election commitments across the local government, culture and the arts, multicultural interests, and sport and recreation portfolio areas. These include:

Screen production facility

The State Government has committed to the investment of $100 million to build a state of the-art film studio and screen production facility at Victoria Quay in Fremantle.

A further $20 million was promised for a film production and attraction fund to leverage the Commonwealth Government’s $400 million film location fund.

Home Fire Creative Industries Pty Ltd has been invited to stage three of the market-led proposal processes, including due diligence and negotiations between the parties.

As the lead (client) agency, DLGSC is working with the Department of Finance and Home Fire Creative Industries Pty Ltd to deliver the market-led proposal.

Aboriginal cultural centre

The State Government has committed $50 million seed funding for the development of an Aboriginal cultural centre.

The DLGSC is working closely with the Department of the Premier and Cabinet to progress the initial planning for the Centre.

Local commitments

The Infrastructure business area is delivering 152 election commitments through funding agreements in the local government, sport and recreation, and multicultural interest portfolio areas.

There are 111 local sport and recreation infrastructure commitments ($10.51 million) and 36 large sport and recreation infrastructure commitments ($110.25 million). In addition, the Infrastructure business area is delivering four local government infrastructure commitments ($3.8 million) and one multicultural infrastructure commitment ($5 million).

Asset maintenance program

The DLGSC provides asset maintenance services to 28 cultural sites and over 65 buildings across Western Australia, from Carnarvon to Albany.

These buildings, the majority of which are heritage listed, are used for the exhibition and safe storage of the State’s cultural and arts collections, performing arts, conservation and research.

State Sporting Infrastructure Fund

The State Sporting Infrastructure Fund provides funding for state sporting facilities managed and/or operated by state sporting associations towards planning, ongoing maintenance and upgrades that are less than $10 million. Projects over $10 million are considered in line with the Department of Treasury’s Strategic Asset Management Framework and the State Government’s budget process.

Projects proposed for funding are identified and prioritised through the State Sporting Infrastructure Plan. Proposals in this category are included in DLGSC’s strategic asset plan.

In 2020-21, 11 sporting associations received funding for 11 projects.

Community Sporting and Recreation Facilities Fund (CSRFF)

The Community Sporting and Recreation Facilities fund is a $12.5 million program that provides financial assistance to community groups and local government authorities to develop community sport and recreation infrastructure.

The program aims to increase participation in sport and recreation, with an emphasis on physical activity, through rational development of sustainable, good quality, well designed and well-utilised facilities.

There were 90 projects approved for 2020-2021 worth over $12.8 million.

Service 4. Regulation of the gambling and liquor industries

Key achievements

The Course in Management of Licensed Premises was recertified through to 31 December 2025. The mandatory unit of this course is approved by the Director of Liquor Licensing as the legislative training requirement that all Unrestricted Approved Managers and Licensees must obtain as per s33 of the Liquor Control Act 1988.

Small Business Friendly Approvals Program

The DLGSC partnered with the Small Business Development Corporation, taking part in a series of workshops which reviewed issues faced by licence applicants and developed strategies to deliver business transformation and enhance the customer experience. Recommendations were developed to streamline application and approval processes.

The recommendations resulting from the project are currently under consideration.

Banned Drinkers Register

The DLGSC has worked with the liquor industry to implement a Banned Drinkers Register (BDR) trial in the Pilbara region. The BDR incorporates a system to identify persons who are not permitted to purchase liquor and notifies the licensee accordingly.

The trial is intended to provide benefits including better targeting of individuals who abuse alcohol to access support services, informing licensees where barring or prohibitions are in place and as a complementary measure to other harm reduction strategies.

The trial commenced in the Pilbara region in December 2020 and licensees are participating on a voluntary basis over a two-year period. An evaluation of the effectiveness of the BDR will be undertaken by the University of Western Australia.

In May 2021 a further trial was launched in the Kimberley region. The Kimberley trial will incorporate a BDR and a Takeaway Alcohol Management System (TAMS).

The TAMS component monitors daily purchases by individual customers and can be used to prevent purchases above any daily limits imposed by liquor restrictions within a locality.

The DGLSC is also working with Scantek on the development of a mobile BDR/TAMS application that can be used on smart devices such as mobile phones and tablets. The mobile application is expected to provide greater flexibility for licensees and will provide consistent levels of privacy and security as fixed scanning units.

Section 175 regulations

A number of Western Australian remote communities continue to explore methods to reduce the level of harm caused due to the use of liquor.

In this regard, section 175(1a) of the Liquor Control Act 1988 enables the Governor, on the recommendation of the Minister, to declare an area of the State a restricted area that prohibits the bringing in, possession and consumption of liquor in the declared area. If a person commits an offence against the regulations the penalties are between $2000 and $5000. This is currently the State Government’s preferred legislative mechanism for alcohol management in remote Aboriginal communities.

In 2020-21 DLGSC assisted 2 communities to renew existing declarations under section 175 of the Act. The total number of communities that are now subject to declarations under section 175 of the Liquor Control Act 1988 is 27.

Gaming Community Trust Grants

The Gaming Community Trust is credited with funds derived from unclaimed winnings from Crown casino and community gaming and the Trust makes recommendations to the Minister for Racing and Gaming for grants that will benefit the community.

The Director General of DLGSC holds the position of Chairman in an ex-officio capacity with departmental staff providing the administrative support via acceptance of grant applications, preparation of agenda items for the consideration of members and upon receipt of Ministerial approval, grant management.

In 2020-21, applications from the following organisations were approved to receive Trust funding:

  • Pinjarra Community Men’s Shed received $66,343 to construct additions to its existing premises.
  • Shark Bay Community Hub received $110,287 to purchase and install a shed in Denham to be utilised by local community groups.
  • Yawuru Jarndu Aboriginal Corporation received $15,078 to complete the fit-out of its workshop and art studio to enable art to be displayed and supplies stored appropriately.
  • Broome Basketball Association received $29,922 towards constructing and equipping a storage shed.
  • No Limits Perth (a not-for-profit charity that assists people experiencing homelessness and financial hardship) has been approved to receive $300,000 towards the purchase of a premises.
  • Family Planning Association of WA received $265,631 to fund the “Safe to Tell” program to conduct a comprehensive education and training program on family and domestic violence to primary health professionals in Perth.
  • Clubs WA received $352,180 to fund the Club Kickstarter Recovery Program to provide training, mentoring and information to regional clubs to assist them to recover from the negative impacts of COVID-19.
  • Starick Services Inc received $64,000 to develop an early intervention service delivery model that incorporates occupational therapy and speech pathology services. 

Service 5. Sport and recreation industry support

The DLGSC provides leadership and support for organisations and personnel delivering sport and recreation state-wide, from grassroots participation to the elite level, through advice and funding support. By building on the existing capabilities of individuals and organisations, DLGSC enables them to operate at their best and provide quality opportunities for participation in sport and recreation.

This is achieved through funding, resources and advice to state sporting associations, community organisations and local governments. The DLGSC proactively engages with the sector to determine and implement strategic responses to current and emerging issues, as well as reviewing DLGSC’s programs and services.

Key achievements

Strategic Funding Review

In May 2019, a Strategic Funding Review of the Western Australian sport and recreation industry was finalised. The review involved considerable industry consultation over the previous 14 months. The review contained 22 findings and 12 recommendations and focuses on ensuring DLGSC’s funding programs are effective in supporting the industry. It also examined areas for improvement in how DLGSC conducts business to simplify its requirements and reduce the administrative burden on smaller community organisations.

The review was completed in November 2020 with all recommendations implemented.

An outcome of the review was the development of a new process to recognise peak bodies for the sport and recreation Industry. This process complements the process for recognising state sporting associations. In 2020-21 the following organisations were formally recognised as either a peak body or a state sporting association (SSA):

  • SportWest (Peak Body)
  • Outdoors WA (Peak Body)
  • Parks and Leisure Australia (WA) (Peak Body)
  • Royal Life Saving Society of WA (Peak Body)
  • WestCycle (Peak Body)
  • Speedway Commission of WA (SSA)Motorsport Australia (SSA)
  • Riding for the Disabled Association of WA (SSA)
  • Rebound WA Inc (wheelchair rugby) (SSA)
  • Sport Climbing Western Australia Inc (SSA)
  • Deaf Sports Australia Federation Ltd (WA Deaf Recreation Association) (SSA)
Women in leadership

The State Government established a target of 50% representation of women on executive boards and committees of State governing bodies. The DLGSC continues to support sport and recreation industry organisations to achieve this target and address the gender diversity imbalance in leadership positions. This support included the delivery of governance training, the development of the Gender Diversity Case for Change Report, development of targeted organisational specific achievement plans, and online training videos outlining the economic, cultural and social benefits when a more balanced leadership structure is implemented. State sporting associations have until June 2022 to reach the target. Since the introduction of the targets, 52% of organisations have achieved them, representing an increase of 27% from 2019-20.

Partnerships with Healthway (Targeted Participation Program and Innovation Challenge Program)

In partnership with Healthway, DLGSC has delivered the Targeted Participation Program (TPP). Focusing on low participation groups, the program has enabled organisations to promote participation, healthy lifestyles and the active engagement of Western Australian communities in sport and recreation. In 2020-21 the program was deferred to enable the 2019 —20 recipients to deliver their programs. Instead, an additional TPP round of up to $5000 for small projects was granted to 23 community organisations.

Healthway and DLGSC also delivered the Innovation Challenge Program. This invited organisations to propose innovative ways to increase physical participation in the community through technology or in other visionary ways. Ten organisations received more than $840,000 ($590,000 from Healthway and $250,000 from DLGSC).

KidSport

The long-running partnership with local government and the community continued to deliver a streamlined, consistent and accessible KidSport program. The highly successful program has proved pivotal for giving kids access to play sport when they might otherwise have not been able to because of financial constraints.

In the last 12 months, 29,355 KidSport vouchers were approved, which equated to $4,058,063 going directly to eligible community sport and recreation clubs. Regional children received 10,292 vouchers, resulting in $1,298,070 worth of support for community sporting clubs, which are the heart of many regional cities and towns.

KidSport had positive demand from diverse sectors of our community, including more than 4300 Aboriginal recipients (17%), more than 1600 kids from the Culturally and Linguistically Diverse community and 1900 with a disability.

Significant changes to KidSport were implemented at the start of 2021 and families can now use their vouchers to access swimming lessons at approved swim schools.

Fifty-two swim schools have been registered and approved, giving 1158 children access to swimming lessons through $168,014 in funding.

The Lotterywest Back to Sport COVID-19 Relief Program provided funding to ensure all eligible children could access KidSport and return to sport. The program included a Club Support Subsidy to assist KidSport approved clubs with volunteer support and engagement, the purchase of additional equipment to support vulnerable participants and enable the club environment to remain COVID safe. This one-off $500 subsidy was accessed by 1080 clubs, which saw $540,000 distributed to community sporting clubs and associations.

To support families and clubs to reconnect through sport in 2021, KidSport vouchers have also been doubled with support from the Lotterywest Back to Sport COVID-19 Relief Program. In 2021, all eligible children will have access to two $150 KidSport vouchers, with the second voucher available from 1 July 2021.

CONNECT Kids

CONNECT Kids provides access to sport participation where a pre-existing club structure is not readily available. Pilot programs with regional community organisations delivered outcomes in the Pilbara, Kimberley, Mid West and Gascoyne enabling team based opportunities and engaging 460 children who did not have established links to local sports.

Equip-Me for Sport

The Equip-Me for Sport partnership with Fair Game and the City of Gosnells provided second-hand sports equipment to low-income families living in the City of Gosnells. During the pilot program in 2020-21, more than 800 pieces of sporting equipment were delivered to 245 children in two rounds.

Learning and development programs

The DLGSC continued to deliver a range of learning and development opportunities for state sporting associations and community organisations. The opportunities for community organisations are delivered through the Every Club program and grant scheme. Member Protection Information Officer training and Dealing with Conflict and Difficult People workshops were also provided across Western Australia.

Training and professional development for state sporting associations focused on governance, risk, workforce development, event management, leadership for women, executive management and human resource management.

The 2020-21 highlights included:

  • Women in Leadership Program including coaching circles, governance and executive leadership.
  • Governance and Applied Risk Management courses.
  • Workforce Development Program in partnership with the Australian Institute of Management.
  • Human Resource Advisory Service.
  • Board survey and governance evaluation.
  • Business workshops for state sporting associations and clubs.
  • Every Club networks and forums.

To support the delivery of these programs, consultation with the sport and recreation industry, has developed the Industry Development Framework and Every Club Implementation Plan. A Learning and Development Advisory Group has been established to assist with implementing the framework and ensuring the training and education needs of the sport and recreation industry are met.

Trails

The DLGSC works collaboratively to facilitate outcomes that support safe inclusive participation and leadership in the planning, construction and maintenance of the State trails network. Since the launch of the WA Hiking Strategy, DLGSC has worked with agency stakeholders, local governments and community organisations to develop projects consistent with the strategy and the COVID-19 addendum.

Fourteen projects were funded that support inclusivity, entry level experiences and the development of people-led hiking activities. A total of $153,205 was provided for these projects across the State, including an Aboriginal guiding program supported by elders, TAFE and the Shire of Harvey.

The DLGSC continues to work collaboratively with other key agencies to maintain the strategic direction of the trails industry. This included awarding contracts for the development of a new mountain bike strategy and renewing the WA Strategic Trails Blueprint. A new training framework initiative has also been undertaken to provide a template for consistent skills development in the planning, construction and maintenance of trails. The framework will suit local government staff, Aboriginal ranger groups and volunteer enthusiasts.

The DLGSC worked with stakeholders to prioritise and fund five trails planning projects in the Wheatbelt, Gascoyne and Great Southern regions. Community engagement at a regional level continued with the hosting of the December 2020 Trails Forum in Dwellingup together with DBCA and the Shire of Murray.

Wheatbelt provision of community sport and regional sport delivery

In partnership with Hockey WA, Netball WA and West Australian Football Commission, DLGSC has worked with identified Wheatbelt communities around non-traditional fixturing models and modified sports formats. Existing sporting boundaries and fixturing models were also examined. This resulted in the amalgamation of sports fixturing (Australian rules football, netball and hockey). Wheatbelt clubs and associations worked collaboratively to consider and implement community sport models and provide locally significant solutions through community leadership, sustainable and efficient governance principles, evidence-based decision making, innovative thinking and collaborative planning.

Women in Sport Forum — Making Her Mark

The DLGSC partnered with Garnduwa to deliver a women’s sport forum that included training and development for key volunteers from around the Kimberley. The forum brought together female sporting leaders from across the region and included two days of panel discussions, workshops and networking opportunities. Special guests who contributed included Olympic gold medallist Cathy Freeman, AFLW footballer Imahra Cameron and television presenter Shelley Ware.

Pilbara Trails Master Plan

The Pilbara Trails Master Plan seeks to deliver a coordinated approach between the four local governments, existing trail managers, landowners and other trail stakeholders. These authorities have worked together to develop the Pilbara Trails Master Plan, with the vision of establishing the North West as WA’s leading trails destination. The master plan has been developed by undertaking and authenticating a regional trails audit, assessing strategic alignment with state and local government plans and commitments, surveying and interviewing a range of stakeholders, evaluating demand and target markets plus analysing opportunities and challenges.

Ngaanyatjarra Lands Sport and Recreation Plan

The DLGSC provided support for the Shire of Ngaanyatjarraku (near the Northern Territory/South Australian border) to document how a holistic sport and recreation service can be provided for the community in a well-managed and sustainable manner. The plan documents three scenario-based future delivery options over a 20-year period and includes detailed staffing, operational, maintenance, asset management and capital project costs.

Peel and South West Volunteer Appreciation Project

The Peel and South West Volunteer Appreciation Project provides an avenue to recognise, thank volunteers and offer a morale boost to the local sporting community. Its added objective over the last year was to show appreciation to community volunteers for meeting the challenges faced by COVID-19, specifically those impacted in the sport and recreation sector. There was a local investment of $20,000 for project proposals from 12 local governments in the regions. A total of 1651 volunteers were supported or recognised for their contributions to community sport.

Peel and South West Sport and Recreation Facilities Plan

The DLGSC Peel and South West offices completed a gap analysis of local sport and recreation facility development needs across the 17 local governments in the two regions. The Peel and South West Sport and Recreation Facilities Plan is based on local government capital projects over a 10-year period, which identifies potential projects likely to be considered leading into funding rounds.

Carnarvon Basketball Program

The Carnarvon Basketball Program was initiated in July 2020 after Basketball WA received funding from DLGSC to coordinate and deliver the program. A working group provided strategic leadership and direction for the development and implementation of basketball in Carnarvon. In total, 221 young people were engaged in the program and 132 (60%) were Aboriginal and with a gender split of 55% boys and 45% girls. As part of the program 13 staff and volunteers were upskilled in a basketball coaching course. The program is strongly supported by service providers in Carnarvon and will continue in 2021 — 22.

Gascoyne Outdoor Recreation Strategy

The Gascoyne Outdoor Recreation Strategy 2021 — 24 was officially released in October 2020. The strategy will facilitate a regional approach for the provision of accessible, high-quality outdoor recreation opportunities in the Gascoyne region and guide the development of infrastructure, programs, events and services which support these opportunities.

Great Southern Regional Trails Master Plan

The Great Southern Regional Trails Master Plan (RTMP) was launched in Mount Barker in September 2020 with progression into implementation during 2021. The RTMP identifies a coherent and clearly outlined program of trail infrastructure development across the Great Southern region for a 10-year period (2019 —2029). The master plan focuses on a range of trail experiences suited to different user groups, including user needs for trail-related products and services across the Great Southern.

It focuses on active leisure trails which involve an outdoor recreation element. This includes terrestrial trails (walking/hiking, trail running, cycling, mountain biking and adventure bike riding) as well as aquatic trails (canoe, kayak, stand-up paddleboard and snorkelling/diving). The outcomes of the plan include a 10-year program of infrastructure delivery across the Great Southern region, providing a long-term view that allows for budget planning between the State and respective local governments, a list of 14 priority trail projects and concept planning for some of the projects.

Great Southern Women in Leadership Governance Program

In November 2020, a Leadership Development Workshop was presented by Dr. Lianne Cretney-Barnes of Board Connexions and guest presentations by Angele Gray and Avril Fahey from the WA Women’s Country Cricket Board. The program explored personal and team leadership styles, board structures, risk management and the roles and responsibilities of board members. The targeted invitation list included 11 attendees who live across the Great Southern including Katanning, Kojonup, Broomehill-Tambellup, Albany, Denmark, Mount Barker and Gnowangerup.

Recreation camps management

The DLGSC’s sport and recreation camps are a successful community service operation delivering quality, affordable, accessible camp experiences in Western Australia. There are four metropolitan locations: Bickley (Orange Grove), Ern Halliday (Hillarys), Point Walter (Bicton), Woodman Point (Coogee) and one regional location at Camp Quaranup (Albany).

The recreation camps rebounded strongly from the COVID-19 related cancellations of mid-2020, delivering 1065 unique camp bookings over the previous 12 months with a total of 74,430 bed nights and 144,068 instructor-led activity participants. COVID-19 disruptions in January, April and late June 2021 mainly impacted clients travelling from regional centres and school holiday programs, as they occurred on the shoulder of school terms and WA public holidays.

The camps instructor workforce delivered more than 216,100 physical activity hours for camp participants through roping, land-based and water activities. Camps staff participated in 3,116 hours of development activities across 31 training events throughout the year.

A pilot program to support field-based child safeguarding awareness was completed ahead of a rollout to all staff in the coming year.

Holiday programs were delivered through the Bickley, Ern Halliday and Woodman Point sites with 428 participants and 2680 activity participations. Holiday programs were not offered in July 2020.

Camps continued its partnerships with St John Ambulance (First Aid Responder Program), Royal Life Saving WA, South Regional TAFE, Notre Dame University and Surf Life Saving WA.

Bickley camp completed the review of its Bushfire Management Plan.

In managing camp services to support COVID-19 restrictions, additional temporary infrastructure has been utilised to meet social distancing requirements. The Camps Chain Safety Group undertook the procurement of roping helmets consistent with the program equipment asset replacement and inspections of roping infrastructure.

style="background-color:transparent;font-size:inherit;text-align:inherit;text-transform:inherit;white-space:inherit;word-spacing:normal;caret-color:auto;font-family:inherit;color:inherit;">Construction on the new Spinnaker Dormitory precinct at Ern Halliday Recreation Camp began in January 2021. This is the first project in the $4.9 million recreation camps re-investment and will deliver a dormitory with 72 beds, renovated dining room and kitchen plus a special access bathroom. Project completion is targeted to support operations for the start of the school Term 4 2021 with balance of projects to be started in the 2021 —22 financial year.

State Records Office

Key achievements

State information management and archival services, which consists of a regulatory/advisory component for all government organisations, as well as management of and access to the State Archives Collection.

Digital transformation is changing the way government organisations work together and provide services to the community. Through the State Records Office DLGSC is playing a significant role in supporting this change through more effective management of, and appropriate access to, information created and used by government.

In 2020-21 over 9000 requests were made to access State archives from the collection and clients ordered these to be digitised or viewed at the public research space on the 3rd floor of the Alexander Library Building, the site of the J.S. Battye Library of West Australian History. This co-located facility, shared with the State Library, Family History WA and Aboriginal History WA, enables original State archives to be accessible during all State Library opening times.

Management of State Archives

Today, most State records are created in digital format i.e. they are born digital. WA government organisations hold tens of petabytes of data in this form and this volume of data is growing rapidly. There is also a significant volume of records in paper and other media. It is estimated that there are over 75 linear kilometres of paper-based State archives, as well as thousands of films and photographs, representing millions of individual records. The State Records Office is working with other government organisations to support appropriate storage, discovery and access to these archives as the essential evidence of the business of government in Western Australia.

Strengthening information management across government

In 2020-21 the State Records Office, in consultation with other agencies, continued a significant reform of State Records Commission Standards for record keeping and supporting systems to strengthen and modernise information management in government in WA.

A detailed report on the performance of State records management in WA is available through the Annual Report for the State Records Commission.

Report on operations

Actual results versus budget targets

Financial targets2020-21 Target (1)2020-21 ActualVariation (2)Notes
Total cost of services
(expense limit)
260,970506,181(245,211)(a) (b)
Net cost of services232,932488,611(255,679)(a) (b)
Total equity735,024519,020216,004(a)
Approved salary expense limit44,75643,3641,392 

(1) The 2020-21 Financial Targets reflect the 2020-21 Resource Agreement.

(2) Further explanations are contained in Notes 9.11 ‘Explanatory Statement’ to the financial statements.

(a) The 2020-21 Actual includes WA Museum (Boola Bardip) finance lease costs of $277.154 million that were not included in the target.

(b) The 2020-21 Target for grants and subsidies included provision for $167.339 million in the target and expenditure against this category was only $133.782 million.

Working Cash Targets2020-21
Agreed Limit
2020-21
Actual
VariationNotes
Working Cash Limit12,541(11,189)(1,352)(c)

(c) Working cash limit was below target by $1.352 million mainly due to lower than expected expenditure under supply and services.

Key performance indicators

Key performance indicators certification

For the year ended 30 June 2021

I hereby certify that the key performance indicators are based on proper records, are relevant and appropriate for assisting user to assess the Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries performance, and fairly presents the performance of DLGSC for the financial year ended 30 June 2021.

Lanie Chopping Director General Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries

15 October 2021

Key performance indicators

The linkage between the government goals, outcomes and services to the community are outlined below:

Government GoalDesired OutcomeService

Better Places

Local governments are supported to meet legislative requirements of the Local Government Act.Service 1 — Regulation and support of local government

Better Places

Strong communities

A sustainable arts and cultural sector that facilitates attendance and participation in arts and cultural activity.Service 2 — Cultural and Arts Industry Support
Better PlacesEfficient and effective asset and infrastructure support services to client agencies.Service 3 — Asset and infrastructure support services to client agencies*
Better PlacesGambling and liquor industries operate responsibly in accordance with legislation.Service 4 — Regulation of the Gambling and Liquor Industries
Better PlacesA strong sport and recreation sector that facilitates participation.Service 5 — Sport and recreation industry support
Outcome 1: Local governments are supported to meet legislative requirements of the Local Government Act.
Effectiveness Measure 1: Percentage of local governments where actions were taken in support of compliance with the legislative framework.1

Why we measure

The Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries (DLGSC) supports local governments to fulfil their statutory obligations and to improve capability in the sector to deliver services to their local communities. Through a risk-based approach, DLGSC identifies the training, guidance, advice and support needs of the sector, as well as those local governments needing targeted intervention and more direct assistance. Part of the improved capability effort is targeted at assisting local government Chief Executive Officers to be better equipped to deal with the challenges currently facing the sector.

This measure allows DLGSC to understand how local governments are performing regarding their leadership and governance to fulfil their statutory requirements and help ensure the outcomes are achieved.

The DLGSC’s Compliance Framework outlines the approach taken to ensure that local governments, their elected members, and employees operate in compliance with the Local Government Act 1995 (and associated Regulations). The Framework details the actions taken to support and achieve greater compliance, including provision of advice services, guidance documents, and monitoring of key information provided to DLGSC by local governments.

What we measure

The Compliance Framework details the actions DLGSC may take in response to possible non-compliance, including arms-length monitoring, requesting further information, dealing with complaints, breaches, probity audits, investigations and authorised inquiries. The DLGSC measures local government compliance performance against this framework to identify areas for assistance to improve capability and governance.

How we measure

The indicator shows the percentage of local governments that had action taken against their elected members or employees under that Compliance Framework in the financial year. Records are collated of all actions including issuing letters of improvement as well as other compliance actions, complaints, audits, inquiries etc taken by DLGSC in response to potential non-compliance, to determine which of Western Australia’s local governments had action taken against them. The figure is then converted to a percentage.

DLGSC are actively increasing the support and guidance to local governments with the aim of reducing actions against specific local governments in the future. In addition to the development of a risk profiling tool, an engagement strategy and other compliance initiatives and material are being developed to achieve this outcome.

Performance
2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021
Target
2020-2021
Actual
Variance
N/AN/AN/A40%22%18%

Analysis

A total of 30 local governments (out of a total of 137) had formal action taken by DLGSC under the Compliance Framework in 2020-21. There was an 18 per cent decrease on the 2020-21 Target.

Some of this decease can be attributed to the COVID-19 pandemic as compliance actions, such as probity audits and visits to local governments were unable to be conducted. In addition, there was also an overall decrease in new complaints made to DLGSC, potentially due to the active guidance being provided by the department, but also as a consequence of external factors such as the pandemic and natural disasters. The DLGSC saw a reduction in the number of serious breach complaints made, as well as the number of formal inquiries commenced.

1 The revised Outcome Based Management framework was implemented in 2020-21.

Outcome 2: A sustainable arts and cultural sector that facilitates attendance and participation in arts and cultural activity.
Effectiveness Measure 2.1: Ratio of Government funding to other income earned for funded arts and cultural organisations.

Why we measure

The Arts Organisations Investment Program (AOIP) and the National Performing Arts Partnership Framework (NPAPF) program fund a cohort of arts and cultural organisations that collectively create and present high quality and diverse arts, cultural and creative experiences for the people of Western Australia. An aim of this multiyear funding is to provide a base operational funding for the organisations to then generate their own revenue and secure other income. A leveraged revenue ratio provides an indication of how successful this cohort of arts organisations have been in generating additional revenue to support arts and cultural activity. It is an indicator of the programs’ aggregate value in line with the objectives of the programs. As a time-series, it is one of the indicators of changes in sustainability of the arts and cultural sector.

What we measure

The indicator measures the ratio of aggregate total funding provided by DLGSC to this cohort of funded arts organisations against the aggregate total of their income from other sources.

How We Measure

The aggregate total amount of multiyear funding and project funding paid in a year to organisations funded through AOIP and NPAPF is calculated as a leverage ratio of their income generated from other sources. This includes earned income, other government funding, sponsorship and private giving. The ratio shows the total amount of income generated from these other sources for each $1 of multiyear and project funding provided by DLGSC to the AOIP and NPAP funded organisations.

The underlying methodology was revised in 2020 from a methodology based on an average of organisation categories to a methodology based on the aggregate totals for all multiyear funded organisations. This was done to better align with objectives of the organisations funding programs, which are to fund a cohort that ensures a diverse and vibrant eco system is supported. An aggregate totals methodology better aligns to the objective of funding a cohort of organisations.

Performance
2017-20182018-20192019-20202020-2021
Target
2020-2021
Actual
Variance
1:3.61:4.21:4.51:2.71:4.774%

Analysis

There was a 74% increase on the 2020-21 Target to Actual. The target was estimated on an expected 50% reduction in earned income, and a 25% reduction in private contribution income (sponsorship, donations etc.) due to the impact of COVID-19, which did not eventuate.

Against Actuals, there was an 4% increase on the 2019-20 Actual to the 2020-21 Actual. In examining the categories in the data that this ratio calculation is based on, the overall 4%increase is based on a 78% increase in Other Government income, a 25% decrease in earned income and a 3% decrease in private contributions. The Other Government category increase is, in the majority, due to an increase in Federal Government funding received through the JobKeeper program, which the arts organisations were eligible for.

Effectiveness Measure 2.2: Percentage of Western Australians attending or participating in an arts and cultural activity.2

Why we measure

The DLGSC culture and the arts ‘Public Value Measurement Framework’ (PVMF) has been developed to understand and measure the public value it creates through its investments in arts and culture and its role as a development agency for the sector. For DLGSC culture and the arts, public value is the cultural, social and economic benefits created by arts and culture for the Western Australian community.

What we measure

This indicator measures how many people attend or participate in arts and cultural activity in Western Australia. This indicator shows institutional value that relates to the value that society collectively places on arts and culture. A strong response in the attendance or participation in arts and culture activity demonstrates that Western Australians support and value arts and culture and will continue to seek experiences that fosters belonging and a sense of community. Arts and cultural activities include a range of activities such as the cinema, music, theatre, dance, visual arts, opera, festivals, libraries, galleries, museums, archives and community cultural events.

How we measure

The annual Arts and Culture Monitor Survey measures the behaviour and attitudes towards arts and culture and is the study used to provide data for this indicator. The survey is a long standing and well-established time series and has been conducted since 2003. The survey captures the frequency as well as the percentage of Western Australians (people, aged 17 years and over) attending or participating in arts and culture activities over a range of time periods. Respondents are asked the following question within the survey:

‘Did you attend or participate in an arts or cultural activity in the past twelve months?’

In 2021, 14,558 online panellists from Thinkfield were invited to complete an online survey, and 1328 responses were received. This represents a sampling error of +/- 2.7 % at the 95% confidence interval.

Performance
2017-20182018-20192019-20202020-2021
Target
2020-2021
Actual
Variance
78%82%74%41%73%32%

Analysis

In 2021, 73% of respondents said they attended or participated in an arts or cultural activity in the past twelve months. This is down marginally from 74% in 2020. The 2020 and 2021 period are the direct impact of COVID-19 lockdowns and restrictions closing the cultural institutions and the cancellation of arts and culture events. This is a larger decrease than the high of 82% in 2019 that was showing a gradual increase over time of attendance and participation in arts and cultural activities in Western Australia pre COVID-19.

The budget target had been revised significantly mainly due to the estimated impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the number of arts and cultural events that could be delivered. However, audiences and participants benefited from the State’s good handling of the impact of the pandemic and at the time of the survey, WA had recorded its longest period without any local cases and was enjoying phase four restrictions.

2 The revised Outcome Based Management framework was implemented in 2020-21.

Effectiveness Indicator 2.3: Percentage of stakeholders who report that the Office of Multicultural Interests had a positive impact on the promotion and support of multiculturalism.

Why we measure

The DLGSC, through the Office of Multicultural Interests (OMI), supports the development of a vibrant and effective multicultural society in Western Australia. This is achieved through the promotion and support of multiculturalism in Western Australia and includes providing information, advice, funding, training and support, and facilitating partnerships and collaboration to achieve the full potential of multiculturalism within the State. This effectiveness indicator provides a measure of OMI’s key stakeholders that believe the support provided contributes to achievement of a vibrant and effective multicultural society.

What we measure

The Effectiveness Outcome is informed by OMI’s annual Stakeholder Satisfaction Survey which identifies the percentage of people who believe OMI has made a moderate to very significant impact in achieving the full potential of multiculturalism in Western Australia.

How we measure

Each year, OMI surveys stakeholders to gain feedback on the extent to which OMI has made an impact on:

  • Strengthening culturally diverse communities
  • Supporting development of culturally inclusive policies and practices
  • Facilitating full participation by culturally diverse communities
  • Developing intercultural understanding
  • Promoting the benefits of Western Australia’s diversity.

For the 2020-21 survey, as for the previous year, respondents were also asked to provide feedback on the extent to which OMI made a significant impact on:

  • Responding to the COVID-19 pandemic and supporting CaLD communities.

Respondents were asked to rate on a scale of no impact, a little impact, a moderate impact, a significant impact or a very significant impact. The survey results were calculated based on the subset of respondents who were able to form an opinion on each of the factors with the ‘don’t know” responses removed. The indicator score was determined by calculating the average score of all six questions. In 2020-21, a sample drawn from a list of 1749 stakeholders was surveyed.

The distribution of the sample was consistent with OMI’s stakeholders as follows:
Community organisations 34%
Another type of non-government organisation19%
State Government agencies13%
OMI grants applicants13%
Individual/Business9%
Local governments6%
Australian Government agencies3%
Consulates2%
 100%

Emails were sent to all 1749 stakeholders with the final sample of 325 responses gained via email (267) and telephone (58). The overall response rate was around 21%. The sample size and comparable results from the online survey is sufficient to be representative and hence the total sample provides a forecasting accuracy of +4.9% at the 95% level of confidence.

The data collection method (online or telephone) had no significant impact on the results and the sample size provided a good foundation for analysis. The data was weighted to correct under-representation of community and non-government organisations and over-representation of OMI grant recipients.

Performance
2017-20182018-20192019-20202020-2021
Target
2020-2021
Actual
Variance
89%94%90%80%94%14%

Analysis

The 2020-21 result of 94% was higher than the target performance of 80%. This result was achieved with or without the additional COVID-19 statement. The result was due to OMI’s continued focus on engagement through diverse projects and activities during the year, and the support provided in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. It highlights the impact of the challenging environment faced by OMI’s stakeholders at the time the 2019-2020 survey was conducted and the positive response to recovery efforts undertaken by OMI in 2020 21.

Particularly positive feedback was also noted on the following areas in the survey report:

  1. ‘Developing intercultural understanding’. The positive feedback in this area is likely to have been as a result of OMI’s funding and support for cultural festivals and events that attract participation by the wider community; provision of opportunities for engagement between Western Australia’s culturally diverse communities and mainstream organisations and groups; and promotional activities highlighting the contributions of Western Australians from culturally diverse backgrounds through awards and a range of media.
  2. ‘Strengthening culturally diverse communities’. This can be attributed to OMI’s work in supporting CaLD communities through grant funding programs, including the Community Capital Works Fund program announced in October 2020 and delivered as part of the State Government’s COVID-19 recovery initiative, together with the promotion of WA CaLD community events and news through its digital media channels.
  3. ‘Facilitating full participation by culturally diverse communities. This indicates the value of the assistance provided by OMI to State Government agencies in implementing the Western Australian Multicultural Policy Framework as well as funding and support for community capacity building programs and strategic projects through OMI’s Community Grants Program.
Outcome 3: Gambling and liquor industries operate responsibly in accordance with legislation
Effectiveness Measure 3.1: Percentage of audit and inspections that comply with requirements and statutory criteria.

Why we measure

The DLGSC is responsible for regulating and maintaining the integrity of lawful racing, gambling and liquor activities for Western Australians to participate in. Through conducting compliance audits and inspections, DLGSC contributes to the promotion, monitoring and enforcements of responsible and lawful gambling and liquor services and this indicator measures how effectively we are delivering the outcome.

What we measure

This indicator measures the effectiveness of DLGSC’s regulatory function within racing, gambling and liquor activities by conducting audit and inspections at licensees’ venues and service providers.

How we measure

The percentage of audit and inspections that comply with requirements and statutory criteria is calculated by dividing the number of compliant licensees/service providers by the total number of inspections conducted.

Performance
2017-20182018-20192019-20202020-2021
Target
2020-2021
Actual
Variance
97%97%98%95%96%1%

Analysis

The actual 2020-21 compliance is higher than targeted indicating licensees and permit holders are generally compliant with their statutory obligations under the administered legislation. Areas of non-compliance typically include: conducting activities without a valid permit or licence or a breach of a term or condition of the permit, licence or Act.

Outcome 4: A strong sport and recreation sector that facilitates participation
Effectiveness Measure 4.1: Percentage of Western Australian participating in organised sport and recreation.

Why we measure

The DLGSC has a vital role to play with supporting the key community stakeholders (i.e. sport and recreation groups and local governments) throughout WA who are directly providing sport and recreation services to Western Australians. Targeted support to ensure quality service delivery, such as:

  • Sport and recreation infrastructure development;
  • Organisational development and capacity building;
  • Governance and management support;
  • Planning and policy implementation; and
  • Information and resources.

This support ultimately impacts on the number of people participating in sport and active recreation. The measure of participation numbers within organised sport and active recreation participation reflects how well our service delivery system is working to deliver a sector that promotes maximum participation.

What we measure

Whilst not directly responsible for organised sport and active recreation participation rates, DLGSC uses this measure as an indicator of how well the sport and recreation delivery system in WA is providing participation environments for members of our community. Analysis of any significant shifts in participation rates may highlight areas/issues within the delivery system that may impact DLGSC policy, planning and service directions.

How we measure

The year 2016 represented the establishment of a new baseline for the monitoring of participation rates of adults and children in sport and physical recreation activities, both at the State and National levels.

The monitoring and understanding of participation rates are vital to assist DLGSC’s delivery of programs and services to support Western Australia’s ongoing participation and involvement in sport and active recreation.

Sport Australia in consultation with the Committee of Australian Sport and Recreation Officers (CASRO) undertook to fund and manage a National Participation in Sport and Physical Recreation Survey (AusPlay) to better provide appropriate participation data to support current and future sport and recreation industry needs and outcomes. From late 2015, AusPlay became the single-source data currency for government and the sport sector that not only tracks Australian sport participation behaviours but also informs investment, policy and sport delivery.

The AusPlay data is not directly comparable to previous participation data collections [i.e. the Multi-Purpose Household Survey (MPHS) or the Exercise Recreation and Sport Survey (ERASS)] due to variations in survey methodology relating to question wording, sampling and fieldwork approaches and non-response bias.

Via the AusPlay Survey, a baseline for participation by Western Australians in organised sport and active recreation has been established. The baseline of 56% is an average of participation rates for WA males and females (aged 15 years and over) involved in organised sport and active recreation.

AusPlay State/Territory data, Western Australia - AusPlay results for January 2020 to December 2020, published 30 April 2021. Refer to Table 3.

Performance
2017-20182018-20192019-20202020-2021
Target
2020-2021
Actual
Variance
57%60%63%56%64%8%

Analysis

The DLGSC's desired outcome is that participation rates for Western Australians in sport and active recreation ultimately be maintained and/or increased. In 2020, 64% of Western Australians (aged 15 years and over) were involved in organised sport and active recreation, an 8% increase on the national baseline of 56% which was established in 2016 when the monitoring of participation rates in adults and children in sport and physical activities, both at a State and National level commenced through the AusPlay survey.

Service 1. Regulation and support of local government
Efficiency Measure 1.1 Average cost per local government for regulation and support

Why we measure

The DLGSC aims to support the sector in the provision of good governance and compliance by monitoring, promoting and enforcing compliance with the Local Government Act 1995 (and associated Regulations). Using a risk-based approach to identify areas needing targeted intervention and assistance, DLGSC provides training, advice, guidance and support across the local government sector. Through the provision of regulatory functions primarily related to the administration of the Local Government Act 1995 including approvals, compliance monitoring and other statutory support, DLGSC assists local governments to achieve best practice in the sector. This measure assesses the efficiency of DLGSC’s resources to regulate and support Western Australian local governments.

What we measure

This indicator determines the cost of DLGSC’s resourcing in providing regulation and support services to local government to ensure they fulfil their statutory obligations.

How we measure

The efficiency indicator combines the costs of both the proactive and reactive regulatory work undertaken by DLGSC, as well as the costs of other services for local governments such as processing of statutory approvals and costs associated with the administration and amendment of the Local Government Act and other legislation and regulations.

Funds expended on grants and subsidies are removed from the total cost, which is then divided by 137 (the number of Western Australian local governments; excluding the two Indian Ocean Territory local governments and nine regional local governments) to produce the indicator.

Performance
2017-20182018-20192019-20202020-2021
Target
2020-2021
Actual
Variance
$98,803$76,743$99,795$109,051$74,655$34,396

Analysis

The average cost per local government for 2020-21 actual was 32% lower than budget due mainly to Stop Puppy Farming grants that were classified as part of the target but not part of the actual.

The average cost per local government was 25% higher in 2019-20 actual compared to 2020-21 due mainly to costs associated to the City of Perth Inquiry that occurred in 2019 20.

Service 2. Cultural and Arts industry support
Efficiency Measure 2.1 Grants operations expense as a percentage of direct grants approved

Why we measure

The DLGSC provides support to the Western Australian arts, cultural and creative sector through a range of funding programs, research services and policy advice. This support contributes to a vibrant sector that provides a range of opportunities for people to participate and attend activities, performances and exhibitions. It also provides opportunities for artists and arts organisations to develop their skills and the artform. Measuring the input costs of providing the grant funding as a percentage of total grant funding is an indicator of the efficiency of delivering grants funding programs.

What we measure

The measure is the cost of resources to deliver these grant programs, as a percentage of the total funding delivered through those grant programs. The measure is primarily impacted by the level of funding provided, and the resourcing requirements to deliver the funding program.

The total grants paid from approved grants, service agreements and financial assistance agreements within the current financial year.

Total operations expense for administering grants which is the staffing and administration costs including corporate overheads for the publishing, receipt and assessment of applications, contract management and system support for the grants managed.

How we measure

An input costs against output delivered percentage based on total operations expenditure for administering grants divided by the total value of the grants paid in the financial year for culture and the arts grant programs.3

Performance
2017-20182018-20192019-20202020-2021
Target
2020-2021
Actual
Variance
N/AN/AN/A4%5%1%

Analysis

There was a 1% increase on the 2020-21 Target to Actual due mainly to a lower number of grants paid than anticipated driven by COVID-19 restrictions.

3The revised Outcome Based Management framework was implemented in 2020-21. This is not a new measure but the calculation method has changed.

Efficiency Measure 2.2 Average cost per project to support and promote multiculturalism

Why we measure

The Office of Multicultural Interests (OMI) conducts a range of projects and initiatives to support culturally and linguistically diverse communities and promote multiculturalism. These are projects and initiatives other than those funded through OMI’s grants programs and are critical to achievement of OMI’s remit to support and promote multiculturalism. The measure indicates the efficiency of OMI staff in delivering these projects to promote and support multiculturalism.

What we measure

Projects to promote and support multiculturalism are identified and detailed in the OMI operational plan. These projects are recorded and tallied each year. The measure includes the amount of human resources (measured in dollars) per project. As the projects are not grants but rather represent the work of individual staff members in delivering them, only staff costs are calculated.

How we measure

Projects are detailed in the Office of Multicultural Interests’ operational plan, which is developed annually on a financial year basis, monitored throughout the year, and reviewed towards the end of the financial year. The indicator is calculated by identifying those projects which involved 20 hours or more of OMI staff time. The total cost of the Office of Multicultural Interests, excluding grants, is divided by the number of projects as identified in the operational plan.

Performance
2017-20182018-20192019-20202020-2021
Target
2020-2021
Actual
Variance
$110,916$87,974$90,958$92,816$102,618$9,802

Analysis

The average cost per project was 11% higher than target mainly driven by increased operating costs (e.g. Information Communications and Technology costs). The increase in 2020-21 actual compared to 2019-20 actual is mainly due to the lower number of projects and higher operating costs.

Service 3. Regulation of the gambling and liquor industries
Efficiency Measure 3.1 Average cost of conducting inspections.

Why we measure

Under the legislative framework provided in the Liquor Control Act 1988, DLGSC undertakes regular audits and inspections to regulate the sale, supply and consumption of liquor, and to minimise harm and ill-health to the public. Additionally, inspections are undertaken to ensure that licensed premises are being operated and maintained to a standard that meets consumer expectations. This measures the productivity of DLGSC in conducting the required audits and inspections.

What we measure

On behalf of the Gaming and Wagering Commission, DLGSC undertakes inspectorial and audit activities to regulate the lawful conduct of gambling activities permitted under the Betting Control Act 1954, the Casino Control Act 1984, the Gaming and Wagering Commission Act 1987, and the Racing and Wagering Western Australia Act 2003. This indicator measures DLGSC’s efficiency in conducting these compliance audits and inspections.

How we measure

This efficiency indicator is determined by dividing the allocated cost of service for the activity by the number of inspections and audits.

Performance
2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021
Target
2020-2021
Actual
Variance
$759$804$680$1,017$938$79

Analysis

The average cost of conducting inspections is lower than target due to the total costs reducing between target and actual across a variety of operating costs.

The 2020-21 actual increased over 2019-20 due to the significant higher number of inspections and audits undertaken in 2019-20 against a cost base that included significant fixed costs. These increased inspections in 2019-20 were in the area of casino regulation, as a result of the extended period of the COVID-19 shutdown of the casino. In the 2020-21, the number of inspections and audits returned to pre COVID-19 levels.

Efficiency Measure 3.2 Average cost of determining applications.

Why we measure

The Racing Gaming and Liquor division provides a licensing service for the liquor and gambling industries. The average cost of evaluating and determining applications measures the efficiency with which DLGSC carries out the application assessment.

What we measure

The DLGSC measures the average cost of evaluating and determining applications for the liquor and gambling industries.

How we measure

The average cost of determining an application is calculated by dividing the total costs for licensing services by the number of applications determined.

Performance
2017-20182018-20192019-20202020-2021
Target
2020-2021
Actual
Variance
$476$490$437$509$413$96

Analysis

The average cost of determining an application was 19% lower than targeted due to a higher number of applications being processed than targeted. The increase in the number of applications determined over target was due to the approval of additional licences to support the liquor industry during the COVID pandemic. As the cost is calculated by dividing the total cost of licensing services by the number of applications determined, the increase in applications resulted in a lower cost per application.

Determinations in detail:

  • 87% of the total applications determined relate to the liquor industry
  • 13% of the applications determined relate to the gambling industries.
Service 4. Sport and recreation industry support
Efficiency Measure 4.1 Average cost of providing support services to sector/ funded organisations. 4

Why we measure

The support services provided by DLGSC to sport and recreation industry organisations contribute to a strong sport and recreation system in Western Australia that facilitates participation. Support services contributing to a wide range of industry outcomes such as:

  • the provision of quality participation environments;
  • excellence in organisational governance and management;
  • quality infrastructure provision including planning, design, development and management;
  • the coordination of sport and recreation services and experiences Statewide to maximise participation opportunities for Western Australians;
  • promoting the understanding of government policy priorities and their relation and impact to sport and recreation; and
  • ensuring there is ongoing sport and recreation contribution to wider public policy agendas.

The DLGSC recognises the limitations to providing a multitude of services direct to the Western Australian public; hence a key focus of DLGSC is to work with the key organisations within the community who are directly responsible for the delivery of sport and recreation programs and services.

It is through these funded organisations that DLGSC’s support services (advice, policy guidance, program implementation, resources and information) are then filtered through to the many regional groups, local clubs and community groups that deliver sport and recreation services to Western Australians.

Providing support for the development and implementation of policy frameworks; and the coordination of sport and recreation services and experiences statewide are vital objectives for DLGSC for facilitating participation by Western Australians in sport and active recreation.

What we measure

The number of funded organisations provided service support by DLGSC, and the FTE attributed to providing service support.

How we measure

Total cost of service (inclusive of staffing, resources and program development, corporate overheads) excluding grants divided by the total number of organisations* provided service support**.

* organisations are defined as funded organisations that have an existing sport and recreation grant/s being managed by DLGSC. Funded organisations do not include recipients of social concession payments as part of the Regional Athlete Travel Assistance Program as the recipients are individuals. Funded organisations are recorded through the grants management systems within DLGSC.

** Service support refers to advice/information/resources (operational and strategic) provided by DLGSC staff to organisations supporting sport and recreation service delivery outcomes Statewide. The breadth and depth of service support differs per organisation and is dependent upon the organisations’ level of funding, engagement and collaboration and/or project involvement with DLGSC throughout the year.

Performance
2017-20182018-20192019-20202020-2021
Target
2020-2021
Actual
Variance
N/AN/AN/A$9,378$7,712$1,666

Analysis

The 18% variation to 2020-21 Budget target unit cost was due to a higher number of organisations provided support than anticipated due to COVID relief and recovery programs, together with a decrease in the service delivery cost.

4 The revised Outcome Based Management framework was implemented in 2020-21.

Efficiency Measure 4.2 Grants operations expense as a percentage of direct grants approved5

Why we measure

The DLGSC provides funding support through a range of sport and recreation grants, service agreements and infrastructure funding schemes including:

  • Industry Investment Program;
  • Regional Grants Scheme;
  • Targeted Participation Funding;
  • Every Club Funding;
  • KidSport and other participation initiatives;
  • Community Sporting and Recreation Facilities Fund; and
  • State Sporting Infrastructure Fund.

These funding programs are based on a combination of identified industry need and current government policy priorities that contribute to the development of a strong sport and recreation sector in Western Australia that facilitates participation. They cover a wide range of infrastructure, organisational development, capacity building and participation issues, which support:

  • the development of sustainable, good quality and well-designed infrastructure;
  • well governed and managed sport and recreation delivery organisations;
  • safe and inclusive participation environments which meet community expectations; and
  • increased opportunities for Western Australians to participate in sport and active recreation activities statewide.

Note — DLGSC provides extensive service support to sport and recreation industry service providers seeking and receiving funding assistance inclusive of: advisory support in organisational governance and management; infrastructure planning, design, development and management; strategic and operational planning; policy implementation and program service delivery as well as grants management advisory and consultancy support to organisations receiving funding support.

What we measure

Direct grants approved refers to the sport and recreation grants and infrastructure grants and KidSport payments made from approved grants, service agreements and financial assistance agreements within the financial year. Grants approved does not include social concession subsidies paid directly to individuals such as Regional Athlete Travel Assistance.

Grants operations expense refers to the staffing expenses responsible for the administration, recording and compliance for the direct grants approved managed by DLGSC.

How we measure

Total operating expenditure for the direct grants approved (total cost of FTE attributable to grants operations less grants) is divided by the total value of the grants paid in the financial year.

Performance
2017-20182018-20192019-20202020-2021
Target
2020-2021
Actual
Variance
N/AN/AN/A1%1%0%

Analysis

There was no variation between the 2020-21 budget target and actual.

5 The revised Outcome Based Management framework was implemented in 2020-21.

Efficiency Measure 4.3 Average Cost per recreation camp experience6

Why we measure

The DLGSC provides quality outdoor recreation experiences which encourage participation and in outdoor activities and recreation camp programs. The extensive range of outdoor activities are delivered by skilled instructors for a wide range of clients, primarily for school and community not-for profit groups. These are provided in unique recreational camps environments across the five locations — Bickley, Ern Halliday, Point Walter, Woodman Point and Quaranup (Albany).

Measuring the average cost of providing camp experiences, which includes accommodation options and participations in a wide range of activities, demonstrates the efficiency in which DLGSC provides its recreation camps management and service delivery to client groups.

What we measure

The average cost per recreation camp experience measures the correlation between throughput volume of accommodation provided and a camp participant’s engagement in a DLGSC organised physical activity program whilst attending the camp, and the cost to deliver these accommodation and participation activity services.

How we measure

The average cost per camp experience is a direct average of the combined unit cost per camp bed nights and camp participations. A camp client may have multiple camp experiences during their stay at a camp.

The total number of bed nights is derived by multiplying the number of persons staying in the recreation camps by the number of nights stayed. The average cost of bed nights is the total cost of running camps (management, staffing, maintenance, etc.) divided by the total number of nights (recorded in the Kinetic Booking System).

The average cost per participation is the total cost of running programs divided by the total number of participations, which are recorded for every group/client utilising the recreation camps via the Kinetic Booking System.

Performance
2017-20182018-20192019-20202020-2021
Target
2020-2021
Actual
Variance
N/AN/AN/A$73$42$31

Analysis

The 42% variation from actual to target was due to the target being based on an anticipated significant impact on usage related to further lockdowns, which did not eventuate.

6The revised Outcome Based Management framework was implemented in 2020-21.

For the following content please refer to the downloadable PDF of the Annual Report:

  • Agency performance
    • Audit opinion page 117
    • Certification of finance statements page 123
    • Financial statements page 124
    • Notes to the financial statements page 129
    • Disclosures and compliance page 191
    • Pricing policies page 192
    • Major capital projects page 192
    • Unauthorised use of credit cards page 193
    • Ministerial directives page 193
    • Governance disclosures page 194
    • Appendices page 217
    • Funding programs page 218
Page reviewed 16 March 2022