Page title

Intro

Contents

  • Statement of compliance
  • Foreword
  • Executive summary
  • Agency overview
  • COVID-19
  • Agency performance
  • Statement of compliance

    For the year ended 30 June 2020
    Hon David Templeman MLA
    Minister for Local Government; Heritage; Culture and the Arts

    In accordance with section 63 of the Financial Management Act 2006, I hereby submit for your information and presentation to Parliament, the Annual Report of the Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries for the reporting period ended 30 June 2020.

    The Annual Report has been prepared in accordance with the provisions of the Financial Management Act 2006.

    Duncan Ord OAM
    Director General
    Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries

    21 September 2020

    Foreword

    Director General, Duncan Ord OAM

    This year has been the most challenging year the DLGSC has faced since its inception in 2017. Even so, this challenge pales against the difficulties faced by our key stakeholders and community organisations — which is likely to continue for some time. COVID-19 has disrupted our social, economic, and psychological state to such an extent that resiliency is being tested in Western Australia to an unprecedented level. The effectiveness of the Western Australian State Government’s response to COVID-19 has ensured that Western Australia has been spared many of the situations that have been devastating in other states and countries.

    Notwithstanding the actions of the State Government, our stakeholders have suffered considerably on a range of fronts during this time. One of the key and immediate roles of the agency this year was the support and guidance for our Local Government sector, culturally and linguistically diverse (CaLD) communities, hospitality industry, sport and recreational clubs, and our culture and the arts organisations. The DLGSC was nominated early to perform a leadership role, which redirected resources and attention for the latter half of the financial year.

    The agency successfully obtained funding through the State Government’s COVID-19 Recovery Plan for its stakeholders across all portfolios, including:

    • $26 million through Lotterywest to arts and sports organisations
    • $1.5 million support package to Western Australian artists from the Art Gallery of Western Australia and the Art Gallery Foundation
    • $2.5 million WA Screen Industry Sustainability Package from Screenwest for below-the-line crew and producers and production and post-production companies
    • $3 million in rent relief for funded organisations impacted in the arts industry
    • $1 million grant program for ongoing creative and cultural activity in WA’s regions
    • $16.25 million for the State Football (Soccer) Centre to match the Commonwealth Government’s contribution to the project

    Not only is assistance delivered through funding, but through regulatory or policy change. Under the directions of the Emergency Management Act 2005, the department enacted immediate changes to assist organisations and businesses stay afloat. Some of the important changes affected the delivery of local governments to our community, such as allowing expenditure on goods and services related to the emergency without requiring a tender process — saving time and assisting our economy.

    Under the Local Government Act 1995, powers were created to suspend local laws by the local government authority, and the Minister to issue orders in relation to the Act. Other key initiatives included the department issuing 4976 occasional licences to 640 licensed premises to allow the sale of packaged liquor with a meal (takeaway), increasing the land area applicable to a licence’s Extended Trading Permit to allow socially distanced service during the period, and refunding 2020 annual liquor licence fees, returning approximately $3.26 million to the industry. These changes assisted our stakeholders during a very difficult period, demonstrating the agency’s responsiveness.

    In other essential work, the department continues to focus heavily on the education, improvement, and engagement with local government. With several serious Authorised Inquiries undertaken, including the inquiry into the City of Perth, department officers have worked tirelessly to perform their duties ethically and effectively, while operating in a difficult environment. The department has taken the approach of education and information on local government operations, with local governments progressing through inductions and training for elected members as a result of the Local Government Legislation Amendment Act 2019.

    Other important work progressed to parliament following a public submission process, which received over 4000 submissions was the Dog Amendment (Stop Puppy Farming) Bill 2020. The Bill was introduced in the Legislative Assembly on 19 February of this year. Clearly work such as this demonstrates that the work department officers do is of importance to the community.

    Work across the department, Local Government Professionals WA and Local Government Integrated Planners Network produced the Community Resilience Scorecard, which for the first time, mapped wellbeing of the community, with over 7000 adult participants in WA. The Scorecard assists local governments in focusing on what matters to their community — and delivering on those priorities well.

    This year also saw the launch of the Western Australian Multicultural Policy Framework, which will provide opportunities for all Western Australians to participate equitably in civic, social, economic, and cultural life in the State. I believe implementation of the framework and developing the Multicultural Plans across the public sector will uncover very real ways to ensure people from CaLD backgrounds are provided opportunities in the public sector — and hopefully wider.

    The newly-created Community Support Fund provided a total of $980,000 to not-for-profit CaLD service organisations and CaLD umbrella community associations over three years, who will collectively contribute to improving settlement, disability, employment, health, mental health, and family and domestic violence help to the community.

    Once again, the department’s culture and the arts portfolio delivered a program over a number of years to the industry in Western Australia. Over $37 million was distributed this year, including $20 million to non-government organisations, over $3 million to individuals, groups and organisations through project grants, $1.7 million through arts sector partnerships, $3.08 million in funding through the Regional Arts and Culture Investment Program grants programs, $1.7 million through the Regional Exhibition Touring Boost and $3.1 million to Screenwest.

    The culture and arts division also supported the Small Business Development Corporation in implementing the COVID-19 Land Tax Assistance for Landlords program. This was a significant undertaking requiring the development on an online grant application pathway and assessment process that in the first 2 months received over 400 applications, providing $575,000 support to commercial landlords. Staff from sport and recreation and racing, gaming and liquor also supported the assessment process.

    The department delivered on the State Government’s election commitment to the Contemporary Music Fund for its first year in 2019-20. Forty-one successful applicants were provided funding for recording, professional development, and touring. This initiative is just another example of the support necessary to create our diverse and awesome music industry in Western Australia.

    This year saw the fantastic refurbishment of His Majesty’s Theatre. The $6.5 million investment in this beautiful building included the installation of a custom-designed orchestra pit lift, new stairways, and a new box office. The refurbishment has allowed Western Australians to retain this incredible building for longer, in a magnificent state. I’m proud of the space this has created for performers, and for the community.

    The State Government’s election commitment to “Elevate” is well underway, with construction of the external lift and bridge to the rooftop bar of the Art Gallery of Western Australia scheduled for completion by December 2020. This has been a challenging and exciting project for the department. In addition, the new museum, with an investment from Government of $400 million, is due to open to the public in November 2020 — this will be a long-awaited project for the entire Western Australian community no doubt!

    In other exciting news, the State Government announced in June of this year that the State Football Centre would be developed in Queens Park in the City of Canning. The Centre will be a centre-of-excellence for football in Australia and the Indian Ocean rim and will include Football West’s administration, training facilities and pitches to support junior, high-performance development, as well as grassroot and community football programs. I look forward to the delivery of the Centre.

    Importantly, we continued to provide financial assistance to community groups and local government authorities to develop community sport and recreation infrastructure this year, at a cost of $10.4 million across 67 projects in the Community Sporting and Recreation Facilities Fund.

    Across the licensing activities, the department has continued its efficient processing of applications this year, with a total of nearly 20,000 applications in total. In addition, the department has continued work on a range of key initiatives of State Government — including the Banned Drinkers Register, a project designed to assist those people who struggle with alcohol misuse. The Register will be contemplated alongside other important tools to combat harm, including section 175 regulations in communities opting to ban alcohol, and population health measures.

    Sport and Recreation initiatives have continued with strength this financial year. The Strategic Funding Review was finalised, providing the department with a more strategic focus of where funding should go, and areas of improvement. Eleven of the twelve recommendations from the Review have been implemented this year.

    The Asian Engagement Sports Funding Program allowed the department to host leading sporting agencies in East Java, Indonesia, Zhejiang Province, China this year, resulting in progressed negotiations towards formal agreements. This is a great result in forming key, long-lasting relationships across Asia.

    KidSport continues to thrive — this year, 18,596 KidSport vouchers were approved at a value of approximately $2.5 million. Pleasingly, diversity was evident in demand for KidSport this year, demonstrating the need and appreciation of department and Government efforts to develop equal opportunity in all endeavours.

    In our recreation camps, 800 unique camp bookings were made this year, with 55,948 bed nights and 93,812 instructor-led activity participations. Woodman Point was used in partnership with the Department of Communities this year to provide accommodation services throughout the COVID-19 lockdown period in Western Australia, which only reinforces our need to remain versatile and responsive.

    The Aboriginal History Research Services (AHRS) undertook significant work this year, providing 267 comprehensive responses to family history applications, responding to 32 native title queries, 26 general research applications, 36 confirmation of birth requests, and 3 public trustee requests. In addition, it responded to 195 requests for information under the Redress Scheme, and 24 Freedom of Information requests relating to the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse. The work can be quite demanding and often involves the analysis of particularly sensitive historical materials. However, it is essential and I am grateful to the AHRS for their tremendous effort.

    Another exciting project this financial year was the Gnarla Boodja Mili Mili (or Our Country on Paper) — this fantastic project comprises an online, interactive map of traditional Aboriginal place names in central Perth. The map will form part of a travelling exhibition with the Museum of Perth.

    On a more serious note, this year has brought considerable challenges in meeting obligations of the Office of the Auditor General and fulfilling recommendations of Audits performed. In a proactive capacity, the department delivered its first Strategic Internal Audit Plan to support business improvement. The department has balanced its core business, development of new projects and Government initiatives alongside the effects of COVID-19, while making considerable progress to audit recommendations. Staff have supported me as Director General throughout and I appreciate the significant work they do.

    The department will continue its important and valued work for stakeholders next financial year. I thank the wonderful and dedicated staff of the department for their work as outstanding public servants.

    Duncan Ord OAM
    Director General
    Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries

    21 September 2020

    Executive summary

    The DLGSC works in areas of social, economic and community importance in Western Australia. The department comprises a diverse portfolio — providing policy support and leadership in sport, recreational activity, cultural and artistic endeavours, programs, and initiatives for visitors to our great State. Core business of the department also includes regulation of racing, gaming, and liquor — a vast area with direct implications for businesses, and support to local governments — an ever-increasing role in context of current events in local government.

    The department succeeded in fulfilling key initiatives and projects this financial year, underpinned by our values, strategic direction, and vision. A brief overview of the department’s key achievements is provided below:

    • Local Government reform — Continuing the work of last financial year, the department has focused on planning the implementation of the City of Perth Inquiry Report and Local Government Act Review Panel Report findings to improve the delivery and integrity of local government.
    • Culture and the Arts recovery post-COVID-19 — A Recovery Plan will be implemented by the department to provide greater certainty to the industry and build local capability, provide development opportunities, activate venues, provide regional touring and create jobs.
    • Sport and Recreation recovery post-COVID-19 — In partnership with Lotterywest, the department will support the sector through $8 million in grants to continue the integral role sports and recreational activity plays in Western Australia through this difficult period.
    • Support of CaLD communities through recovery — The recovery program for CaLD communities in Western Australia will assist associations with refurbishments, maintenance and upgrades of existing facilities. This will create jobs in the wider WA community.
    • The new WA Museum — Work on the new museum has continued in earnest and will be opened in November 2020. This long-awaited project will see West Australians enjoy new exhibition designs and spaces in line with contemporary experiences.
    • New infrastructure for community enjoyment — $190 million has been committed to new infrastructure, under the management of the department, including the new State Football Centre, Recreation Camps Revitalisation the redevelopment of His Majesty’s Theatre and the Perth Concert Hall.
    • Elevate — the Art Gallery Rooftop project — Work on this exciting project has continued this financial year, and will result in a cultural and commercial venue featuring a major Aboriginal artwork, a rooftop sculpture walk and a 500-person social venue, a new addition to the leisure scene in Perth.
    • New and improved library services for WA — Implementation of a framework supported by the State and local government stakeholders has progressed this financial year, with work continuing into next year. This substantial project will allow our State records, archives and materials to continue to be available to the community for years to come.
    • Policy development in liquor — The department has continued work on the trial of a Banned Drinkers Register in the Pilbara this financial year, with a framework for participation being developed, and evaluation being determined. This project will allow the department to manage liquor in line with community expectations and evidence-based policy in future.

    There has been a strong focus on governance and risk this financial year, with the guidance and support of the Office of the Auditor General (OAG). COVID-19 created crucial recovery work for the department, which has been a challenging period for dedicated public servants — but work on the management of risk and governance in the department has continued throughout. Whilst there are improvements to be made, the department has made tremendous progress in addressing risks identified internally and by the OAG. This is a difficult, but necessary task in all departments to ensure that the Western Australian community is being served with integrity and transparency.

    One of the department’s biggest challenges, and biggest successes this year was the management and response to COVID-19 with our key stakeholders, government, business, community organisations and CaLD communities. A snapshot of the department’s and stakeholders’ experiences during this period is included in this year’s Annual Report.

    This year has taught the department that the work our officers do is integral to the enjoyment and sustainability of community life. A significant risk during a period of emergency is that services cease that assist people in their mental capacity to manage their lives. The public servants of this department ensure that the important work in sport and recreation, arts and culture, racing, gaming and hospitality businesses, and CaLD communities can be supported in whatever format is possible. The department will be prepared for 2020-21 year with renewed vigour.

    Agency overview

    Agency profile

    The department works with partners across government and within its diverse sectors to enliven the Western Australian community and economy through support for and provision of sporting, recreational, cultural and artistic policy, programs and activities for locals and visitors to the State.

    The department provides regulation and support to local governments and the racing, gaming and liquor industries to maintain quality and compliance with relevant legislation,

    for the benefit of all Western Australians.

    Strategic intent 2019-21

    Vision

    Creating a vibrant, inclusive and connected WA community.

    Mission

    To enable dynamic and inclusive communities and support the WA economy through effective regulation and the facilitation of outstanding sporting and cultural experiences and opportunities.

    Values

    • Customer focussed
    • Responsive
    • Respectful
    • Accountable
    • Innovative

    What we do

    The department is responsible for the delivery of the following services to government and community:

    • Improve capability and outcomes across the local government, sport and recreation and culture and arts sectors.
    • Enable equitable participation of CaLD communities across all aspects of society and promote, support and celebrate the State’s cultural diversity
    • Contribute to the wellbeing of the community through effective regulation.
    • Encourage and enable understanding and acknowledgment of Aboriginal history and contemporary society.
    • Facilitate public engagement with highly valued sporting, cultural and recreational spaces and places.

    Approach

    We will achieve this by:

    • Work collaboratively with the community, all tiers of government and key stakeholders to implement a shared approach to improve community engagement and experience.
    • Be efficient, effective and responsive through an agile and flexible workforce.
    • Respond proactively to State Government imperatives such as election commitments and stated strategic priorities.
    • Contribute to the achievement of whole-of-State Government targets.
    • Use evidence-based information to develop community focused engagement and partnerships.

    Objectives

    ObjectiveTo support the local government sector through a for purpose sound legislative framework that enables efficient and effective services to communities and good governance and complianceTo promote participation and achievement in sport, recreation, culture and artsTo support and grow the cultural industriesTo promote the benefits of cultural diversity and social inclusionTo ensure liquor and gambling activities are conducted in the public interestTo celebrate Aboriginal culture and preserve history and traditions
    Key initiativeLocal Government Better Practice ReviewsMid-Tier Events StrategyState-wide Cultural Infrastructure FrameworkState-wide Multicultural Policy FrameworkRegulations to support the Liquor Control Amendment Bill 2018State-wide Aboriginal Engagement Strategy
    Key initiativeRisk assessment model for local governmentFacilitate the allocation of appropriate land for Public Open Space policy and the delivery of community infrastructureCreative Industries Strategy+8 FestivalImplement the amendments of the Gambling Bill and associated regulationsDevelop effective partnerships and improved information management to increase access to Aboriginal family history information
    Key initiativePerformance framework and vision for local governmentFacilitate the implementation of the Shared Use Guide for the education facilities (including sport, recreation, cultural and other community uses)Development of culture and arts infrastructure business caseImplementation of the Community Support FundTrial of a Banned Drinkers Registers/Takeaway Alcohol Management SystemBroaden the role of the Aboriginal Sports Council
    Key initiativeLocal Government Act reformSense of place for the Perth Cultural CentreDelivery of the New Museum ProjectContribute to the objectives of the State Government Asian Engagement StrategyOnline lodgement of permanent liquor licence applicationsIncorporation of Aboriginal interpretation into trails development
    Key initiativeLocal Government Policy FrameworkRegional Film FundRegional Arts and Culture Investment ProgramEnhance Asian Engagement via contribution to the State Asian Engagement Strategy and the Asian Engagement Through Sporting Funding SchemeInvestigating and implementing methods for prohibiting wagering contingencies 
    Key initiativeReview of the MyCouncil websiteImproving opportunities for women in sport and in sport leadershipContemporary Music FundTargeted Participation grant programNational Framework for Consumer Protection for online gambling 
    Key initiativeReview of the EveryClub program including the role of sport and local governmentsDelivery of funding programs to support participation in sport and active recreationRegional Exhibition Touring BoostSupport CaLD communities to deliver large-scale events to promote social, economic and cultural contributions to attract international and interstate visitors  
    Key initiativeLocal and Regional Infrastructure planning and funding supportDelivery of Art Gallery Elevate 2020 project    
    Key initiative Facilitate the motorsport industry delivery on the WA Motorsport Strategy    
    Key initiative Implement the State Sporting Infrastructure Plan    
    Key initiative To facilitate well-planned, maintained, managed and utilised sporting, recreation, cultural and community infrastructure    

    Responsible Ministers

    The department was established on 1 July 2017 under the Public Sector Management Act 1994. At 30 June 2020, the department was responsible to the following Ministers:

    Hon David Templeman Dip Tchg BEd MLA
    Minister for Local Government; Heritage; Culture and the Arts

    Hon Michael (Mick) Murray MLA

    Minister for Seniors and Ageing; Volunteering; Sport and Recreation

    Hon Paul Papalia CSC MLA Minister for Tourism; Racing and Gaming; Small Business; Defence Issues; Citizenship and Multicultural Interests

    Hon Benjamin (Ben) Wyatt MLA LLB, MSc

    Treasurer; Minister for Finance; Energy; Aboriginal Affairs

    Legislation administered

    The department assisted in the administration of the following legislation on behalf of its portfolio Ministers as at 30 June 2020.

    1. Art Gallery Act 1959
    2. Caravan Parks and Camping Grounds Act 1995
    3. Cat Act 2011
    4. Cemeteries Act 1986
    5. City of Perth Act 2016
    6. Combat Sports Act 1987
    7. Control of Vehicles (Off-road Areas) Act 1978
    8. Dog Act 1976
    9. Gaming and Betting (Contracts and Securities) Act 1985
    10. Library Board of Western Australia Act 1951
    11. Liquor Control Act 1988
    12. Local Government (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 1960
    13. Local Government Act 1995
    14. Local Government Grants Act 1978
    15. Major Events (Aerial Advertising) Act 2009
    16. Museum Act 1969
    17. Perth Theatre Trust Act 1979
    18. Racing and Wagering Western Australia Act 2003
    19. Racing Bets Levy Act 2009
    20. Racing Penalties (Appeals) Act 1990
    21. Racing Restriction Act 2003
    22. South Fremantle Oil Installations Pipe Line Act 1948
    23. Sports Drug Testing Act 2001
    24. State Records Act 2000
    25. Sunset Reserve Transformation Act 2014
    26. The Western Australian Turf Club Act 1892
    27. Western Australian Greyhound Racing Association Act 1981
    28. Western Australian Sports Centre Trust Act 1986
    29. Western Australian Trotting Association Act 1946
    30. Western Australian Turf Club (Property) Act 1944

    Enabling legislation

    In performing its functions, the department is compliant with relevant law, including, but not limited to:

    • Auditor General Act 2006
    • Disabilities Services Act 1993
    • Equal Opportunity Act 1984
    • Financial Management Act 2006
    • Freedom of Information Act 1992
    • Industrial Relations Act 1979
    • Legal Deposit Act 2012
    • Minimum Conditions of Employment Act 1993
    • Occupational Safety and Health Act 1984
    • Public Interest Disclosure Act 2003
    • Public Sector Management Act 1994
    • Salaries and Allowances Act 1975
    • State Records Act 2000
    • State Superannuation Act 2000
    • State Supply Commission Act 1991
    • Workers’ Compensation and Injury Management Act 1981

    Operational structure

    Structure at 30 June 2020.

    DLGSC Operational Structure as at 30 June 2020

    Portfolio structure

    DLGSC interagency relationships.

    DLGSC Portfolio structure 2019_2020

    Executive structure

    Structure at 30 June 2020.

    DLGSC Executive structure 2019_2020

    Executive leadership

    The DLGSC has the following business areas: local government, regulation, infrastructure, sport and recreation, culture and the arts, Aboriginal History WA, Office of Multicultural Interests (OMI) and State Records Office. These business areas are supported by the operational areas of corporate services, finance, and office of the Director General.

    Below are the executive leadership roles at 30 June 2020.

    PositionRole
    Director GeneralDuncan Ord OAM
    Deputy Director GeneralMichael Connolly
    Assistant Director GeneralMargaret Butcher
    Executive Director Corporate ServicesGlen Kar
    Executive Director Sport and Recreation and Local Government PlanningKim Ellwood
    Acting Executive Director Culture and the ArtsRob Didcoe
    Executive Director InfrastructureLisa Fanciulli
    Director Aboriginal History UnitAnna Wyatt
    Acting Executive Director Office of Multicultural InterestsKim Ellwood
    Director and Portfolio Chief Financial OfficerShanaeya Sherdiwala

    Business areas

    Local government

    The department provides support across the local government sector to those requesting assistance and others identified as needing targeted intervention or support. The department supports the sector and the community in the provision of good governance and compliance by monitoring, promoting and enforcing compliance with the Local Government Act 1995. The department reviews and administers a range of legislation impacting on local governments and the community including dogs, cats and cemeteries. Through the provision of regulatory functions primarily related to the administration of the Local Government Act 1995 including approvals, compliance monitoring and other statutory support, the department assists local governments with best practice in the sector.

    The department has liaised and worked with local governments as part of the State Government’s response to manage COVID-19.

    Strategic Initiatives

    The Strategic Initiatives business area supports local governments to fulfil their statutory obligations, to improve the capability of the sector to deliver effective governance and services to their communities. The business area provides advice and support across the local government sector and uses a risk-based approach to identify those needing targeted intervention and assistance. The business area supports the sector in the provision of good governance and compliance by monitoring, promoting and enforcing compliance with the Local Government Act 1995. Through the provision of regulatory functions primarily related to the administration of the Local Government Act 1995 including approvals, compliance monitoring and other statutory support, the business area assists local governments with best practice in the sector. The business area also reviews, administers and supports a range of other legislation impacting on local governments and the community.

    Policy and Engagement

    The Policy and Engagement business area is responsible for managing the State Local Government Partnership Agreement and monitoring the City of Perth Committee in accordance with the City of Perth Act 2016. The business unit works across government to support engagement with local government. Key collaborative initiatives have included the development of the State Climate Change Strategy, State Waste Strategy, and development of new State Local Government Partnership for the provision of Public Library Services. The business unit is responsible for designing and contributing to programs that support the capability of the sector.

    Strategic Coordination and Delivery

    The Strategic Coordination and Delivery business unit is responsible for supporting the local government sector in whole-of-government policy development and through representation on key government reform initiatives (including off road vehicles, the transition of employees to state-based awards, puppy farming, cemeteries and cremations, short stay accommodation). The business unit has represented the sector in key reforms resulting from the Royal Commission into Institutional Child Sexual Abuse (including improved child safeguarding, information sharing and redress). The business unit also manages a key partnership with Local Government Professionals (WA) that provides CEO support (coaching, mentoring, leadership training) and a suite of conferences, networking and professional development opportunities for the sector.

    Regulation

    The Regulation business area receives, processes and determines applications in accordance with the legislation. The business area administers a range of legislation impacting on local governments and the community including dogs, cats and cemeteries relating to approvals, compliance monitoring and other statutory support. The business area provides a licensing service for the liquor and gambling industries and applications are considered and determined on their merits in accordance with the relevant legislative requirements. Audits and inspections are conducted to verify that the provision of gambling is conducted in a responsible and lawful manner. Undertakes regular audits and inspections to regulate the sale, supply and consumption of liquor, and to minimise harm and ill-health to the public. Additionally, inspections are undertaken to ensure that licensed premises are operating and being maintained to a standard that meets consumer expectations.

    Infrastructure

    The business area provides leadership to promote and guide infrastructure planning and develop sound policy based on the key principles of facility provision. It manages and maintains key civic infrastructure across the sport and recreation, and culture and the arts portfolios and provides client agency services for the planning and delivery of major State sport and cultural infrastructure projects in line with the Department of Treasury’s Strategic Asset Management Framework.

    The business area also delivers the Community Sporting and Recreation Facilities Fund, State Sporting Infrastructure Fund and a range of infrastructure related election commitments. It provides strategic policy, leadership, and funding support on civic infrastructure planning and delivery across local government.

    Sport and recreation

    The Sport and Recreation business area provides strategic leadership and support for the sport and active recreation* industry across Western Australia, through funding and advice to State sporting organisations, community organisations and local governments. The business area proactively engages with the sector to determine and implement strategic responses to current and emerging issues and to review the department’s programs and services. The business area works with the industry to support athletes and teams to achieve at all levels, including local, national and international competitions. By building on the existing capabilities of individuals and organisations, the business area enables them to operate at their best and provide quality opportunities for participation in sport and active recreation. The business area also provides experiential outdoor activities to the Western Australian community through the management of recreation camps. The sport and recreation camps are a successful community service operation delivering quality, affordable, accessible camp experiences in Western Australia.

    *Active recreation refers to activities engaged in for the purpose of relaxation, health and wellbeing or enjoyment with the primary activity requiring physical exertion, and the primary focus on human activity.

    Culture and the arts

    The business area supports the delivery of arts and culture activities through strong evidence-based policy, research and funding across Western Australia to achieve State Government outcomes. The business area undertakes the development and implementation of research and industry projects to strengthen the policy basis of its programs and services.

    Working with a range of stakeholders and partners, the business area provides information and opportunities to foster growth, connections and access to industry intelligence. This includes statistics on cultural funding, employment, attendance and participation, and Western Australia’s values and attitudes towards culture and the arts. The business area funds non-government arts organisations as a base from which they can then generate additional income through sponsorship, box office and other agencies to support their annual program of activities. It also provides project funding to provide artists and creatives opportunities to undertake a broad range of projects and activities across multiple art forms. Investment in arts and culture is essential to ensure Western Australians have ongoing access to arts and culture activities.

    Aboriginal History WA (AHWA)

    The business area provides comprehensive responses to Aboriginal people seeking historical family information through a formal Family History application process. This includes genealogical charts and Tindale photographs. In addition, the area manages access to restricted government records previously managed by the Department of Aboriginal Affairs. As well as these core services, the AHWA undertakes historical projects that provide an in-depth understanding of the Aboriginal history of Western Australia and assists in the healing and reconciliation journey.

    Further, the area responds to requests under the National Redress Scheme (Redress) from Aboriginal applicants throughout Western Australia. This work is undertaken in response to recommendations of the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse.

    Office of Multicultural Interests

    Through the development and implementation of policies, programs and services, the business area aims to achieve the full potential of multiculturalism. Western Australia is one of the most culturally, linguistically and religiously diverse states in Australia, with 32% of the population born overseas. The State is home to people originating from 190 countries, speaking around 240 languages and dialects, including Aboriginal languages, and following more than 100 faiths. The development and implementation of culturally inclusive policies, programs and services requires the OMI to work with business and industry groups, government and non-government agencies, CaLD communities and the wider community.

    State Records Office (SRO)

    The SRO on behalf of the State Records Commission, regulates the management of records of information across the State and local government sector. SRO is also the custodian of the largest and most significant documentary heritage collection in Western Australia. The State Records Office fosters best practice information management processes throughout government to enable effective, efficient, open and accountable business practices. The State Records Office ensures the identification and preservation of WA’s State archives and facilitates public access to this rich source of historical and evidential information.

    Workforce

    Workforce demographics

    DLGSC demographics at 30 June 2020.

    WomenMen
    Total266186
    DLGSC employment typeWomenMen
    Permanent Full-time176156
    Permanent Part-time515
    Fixed Term Full-time2518
    Fixed Term Part-time105
    Casual paid42

    Workforce diversity

    NumberNumber of senior management rolesPercentage of women in senior management roles
    Women in senior management roles51145%
    NumberPercentage of employees
    Youth (employees under 25)154523%
    Identify as an Aboriginal Australian94522%
    Identify as people with disability174524%

    Performance Management Framework

    The DLGSC achieves its State Government desired outcomes through the delivery of 10 key services. While DLGSC contributes to all of the government’s Outcomes Based Service Delivery goals, its primary contribution is to the following government goals:

    • Better places: A quality environment with liveable and affordable communities and vibrant regions.
    • Strong communities: Safe communities and supported families.

    The below table illustrates the relationship between the DLGSC desired outcomes and the most relevant government goal. The DLGSC’s performance is highlighted in comparative data illustrated in the outcomes and key effectiveness indicators and services and key efficiency indicators tables. Further information is outlined later in the report in the Key Performance Indicators section.

    Government GoalOutcomeServices

    Performance Management Framework

    Better Places: A quality environment with liveable and affordable communities and vibrant regions

    Local governments were capable and well-governed
    • Service 1 — Regulation and support of local government
    A sustainable arts and cultural sector that enhances social and economic wellbeing
    • Service 3 — Arts industry support
    • Service 4 — Research, policy development, information and support
    Efficient and effective services to the culture and arts portfolio and government
    • Service 5 — Corporate and asset and infrastructure support to the culture and arts portfolio and government
    To promote, monitor and enforce responsible and lawful gambling and liquor services in accordance with legislation
    • Service 6- Licensing — evaluation and determination of applicants
    • Service 7 — Compliance audits and inspections
    A strong and diverse sport and recreation system in Western Australia that is accessible, encourages maximum participating and develops talent
    • Service 8— Industry leadership and infrastructure development
    • Service 9— Building capacity and participation
    • Service 10 — Recreation camps management
    Strong Communities: Safe communities and supported families Western Australia is recognised as a vibrant and effective multicultural society
    • Service 2 — Promotion and support of multiculturalism

    Outcomes and key effectiveness indicators

    While the department did not exist prior to 1 July 2017, comparative data has been disclosed from the former departments’ audited data.

    Desired outcomesKey effectiveness indicator2015-20162016-20172017-20182018-20192019-20 Target2019-20 Actual
    Local governments were capable and well-governed LG 1: Percentage of local governments that did not have an action taken against them under the department’s compliance framework 54%32%29%49%55%61%
    LG 2: Percentage of local governments with Integrated Planning and Reporting plans reviewed 100%96%38%87%25%100%
    Western Australia is recognised as a vibrant and effective multicultural society OMI 1: Percentage of organisations and individuals who report that the Office of Multicultural Interests had a positive impact on the promotion and support of multiculturalism 84%83%89%94%80%90%
    OMI 2: Percentage of community grants for multicultural organisations that were acquitted against identified outcomes 80%94%93%98%85%93%
    A sustainable arts and cultural sector that enhances social and economic wellbeing CA 3: Ratio of government funding to other income1:7.161:6.291:6.121:6.331:3:341:6:13
    CA 4: Public value of the contribution of arts and culture to the State’s identity and community 686971736872
    Efficient and effective services to the Culture and Arts Portfolio and Government CAP 1: Percentage of annual infrastructure maintenance budget expended on portfolio infrastructure maintenance requirements 91.6%99.4%98.0%101%95%98%
    To promote, monitor and enforce responsible and lawful gambling and liquor services in accordance with the legislation RGL 1: Percentage of audit and inspections that comply with requirements and statutory criteria98%98%97%97%95%98%
    A strong and diverse sport and recreation system in Western Australia that is accessible, encourages maximum participation and develops talent SR 1: Satisfaction rating of policy development and leadership provided by the department 93%93%89%91%85%89%
    SR 2: Satisfaction rating of the department’s consultation advice to clients 88%88%85%86%90%81%
    SR 3: Satisfaction rating of the department’s grant’s management 88%89%84%90%85%89%
    SR 4: Satisfaction rating of the department’s programs, initiatives and resources93%92%90%91%90%87%
    SR 5: Western Australian participation in organised sport and active recreation56%56%57%60%56%63%
    SR 6: Satisfaction rating of recreation camps management and service delivery95%94%94%94%87%96%

    Services and key efficiency indicators

    While the department did not exist prior to 1 July 2017, comparative data has been disclosed from the former departments’ audited data.

    Delivered servicesEfficiency indicators2015-20162016-20172017-20182018-20192019-20 Target2019-20 Actual
    1. Regulation and Support of Local Government1.1 Average cost per local government for regulation and support$76,070$78,881$98,803$76,743$90,129$99,795
    2. Promotion and Support of Multiculturalism2.1 Average cost per project to support and promote multiculturalism$101,061$99,118$110,916$87,974$106,917$90,958
    2.2 Number of grants and service agreements per full time equivalent273336333336
    3. Arts Industry Support3.1 Grants operations expense as a percentage of direct grants approved6.7%4.1%5.1%5.4%3.5%6.4%
    4. Research, Policy Development, Information and Support 4.1 Research, policy development, information and support expense as a percentage of direct grants approved 5.7%3.9%5.1%5.4%3.5%7.6%
    5. Corporate and Asset and Infrastructure Support to the Culture and Arts Portfolio and Government5.1 Average cost of service per full time equivalent$171,457$138,820$246,636$319,290$22,003$285,299
    6. Licensing - Evaluation and Determination of Applications6.1 Average cost of determining applications$554$460$476$490$448$437
    7. Compliance Audits and Inspections7.1 Average cost of conducting inspections$995$961$759$804$897$680
    8. Industry Leadership and Infrastructure Development8.1 Average cost of providing consultancy (policy, advocacy and infrastructure) to organisations$10,083$10,874$10,080$13,447$10,202$9,124
    8.2 Average cost of providing the contact services (policy, advocacy and infrastructure)$526$740$670$2,893$1,164$1,265
    8.3 Average cost to manage infrastructure grants$3,288$2,114$2,545$2,451$2,302$3,453
    9. Building Capacity and Participation9.1 Average cost of providing consultancy (organisational development and participation) to organisations $13,554$15,523$13,565$11,413$17,946$21,779
    9.2 Average cost of providing the contact services (organisational development and participation)$309$413$344$789$798$635
    9.3 Average cost to manage sport and recreation development grants$2,002$1,893$2,026$1,990$3,021$2,548
    10. Recreation Camps Management10.1 Average cost per bed night$57$53$55$64$56$93
    10.2 Average cost per participation$24$24$25$27$28$39

    Shared responsibilities

    The DLGSC works with all tiers of government to achieve State Government outcomes that will benefit the Western Australian community.

    Culture and the arts

    In partnership with the Australian Government through the Australia Council for the Arts, the DLGSC funds four National Performing Arts Partnership Organisations (formerly Major Performing Arts companies) in Western Australia. They are funded through a joint agreement negotiated between the Australian, state and territory governments. Through the framework jurisdictions continue to work together to deliver significant outcomes for the performing arts sector. In addition, through the Visual Arts and Crafts Strategy the Australia Council for the Arts and DLGSC coordinate funding support for the contemporary visual arts sector by providing directed funding for individual artists, arts and craft organisations, arts events and artist run initiatives.

    In partnership with the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development, the DLGSC delivers several Royalties for Regions funded programs. These programs included the Royalties for Regions-funded Regional Arts and Cultural Investment Program and the Regional Exhibition Touring Boost, both of which support arts and cultural activities within regional WA.

    Office of Multicultural Interests

    2019—20 marks the second year of a partnership between OMI and the Commonwealth Bank of Australia to deliver initiatives that promote multiculturalism in Western Australia. In 2019—20, the funding from this partnership provided to the African Women’s Council of Australia to deliver a series of Africa Week activities including the Australian-Africa Trade, Investment and Cultural Expo; an Australian-African Women in Leadership Forum; and a Parliamentary Friends of Africa function. The partnership has been formally extended for a further three years until 30 June 2023.

    Local government

    The department has worked as part of the whole-of-government development of reforms that respond to the recommendations of the Royal Commission into Institutional Child Sexual Abuse. These reforms will result in state-wide policies and initiatives regarding child safeguarding, information sharing and reporting (to better protect children) and addressing past abuse.

    Sport and recreation

    In partnership with Healthway, the department delivers the Targeted Participation Program to enable organisations to promote participation, healthy lifestyles and active engagement of Western Australian communities in sport and recreation, with a focus on low participation groups. In 2019-20, $1 million of funding ($500,000 from Healthway and $500,000 from DLGSC) was available through this program, with over 30 organisations across the state supported to deliver outcomes for low participation groups to enable more Western Australians to engage in sport, recreation and physical activity.

    Resource agreement

    The Resource Agreement articulates the department’s desired outcomes (both financial and non-financial) and performance targets as stated in the Budget Papers and is consistent with the broader strategic policy direction and priorities of the government. The department’s Resource Agreement is signed by the Accountable Authority, the Treasurer, and the following responsible Ministers under Part 3, Division 5 of the Financial Management Act 2006:

    • Minister for Local Government; Culture and the Arts
    • Minister for Racing and Gaming; Citizenship and Multicultural Interests
    • Minister for Sport and Recreation
    • Minister for Aboriginal Affairs

    The targets identified in the Resource Agreement relate only to the department. The targets published in the Budget Papers for the culture and the arts statutory authorities are subject to separate resource agreements.

    COVID-19

    The department during COVID-19

    The department worked closely with Department of Premier and Cabinet and the Pandemic Coordination Unit regarding whole of government planning, coordination and communication.

    The department made available the entirety of its Leederville Office building to the State Pandemic Coordination Centre (SPCC) as the complexity associated with the coordination of the State response to COVID-19 increased. To make the space available, arrangements were made for staff to work from home and/or relocate to other sites. Several department staff were also seconded to the SPCC to provide further support.

    The department implemented a number of strategies to support employees and the work of the department, including:

    • Development of a pandemic plan to ensure continuity of services, reduced risk to staff and stakeholders, and protecting vulnerable workers;
    • Risk assessment to identify critical functions that needed to be maintained;
    • Ongoing multichannel communication to staff regarding health department advice, employee guidance and support, including good hygiene and social distancing requirements;
    • Finalising and introducing a working from home policy and assessment;
    • Introduction of split and staggered shift arrangements;
    • Protecting people in frontline roles by following Department of Health guidelines around social distancing including creating signs and markings to designate one-way traffic flow and safe distance when standing in common areas, and Perspex partitioning installed at some locations;
    • Creating leave management procedures based on Public Sector Labour Relations advice;
    • Continuity of staff being paid;
    • Creating remote working capability through the fast-tracked deployment of multi-factor authentication and windows virtual desktop and the provision of ICT equipment such as surfaces, laptops and monitors;
    • Sourcing additional mobile devices and considering other devices as working from home options;
    • Determining protocols for infectious incidents;
    • All cleaning performed in accordance with COVID-19 Environmental Cleaning for Workplaces guidance produced by the WA Department of Health;
    • Increasing the standard of cleaning and disinfecting of all high traffic areas including meeting rooms, common surface areas and high touch surfaces;
    • Additional surface cleaning and disinfecting of common surface areas and touch points; and
    • Staged process of returning staff working from home, back to the workplace.

    At the height of the Pandemic, up to 74% of DLGSC employees were enabled to successfully work from home.

    The Digital and Technology Services team also undertook work to assist other areas of business to respond to the pandemic. This included the setup of a system and web portal to manage the Small Business Development Corporation’s Land Tax Assistance for Landlords program, enabling the Culture and Arts grants team to review applications and support the Small Business Development Corporation in providing land tax assistance.

    The department was proactive in identifying and addressing its COVID-19 strategic risks. Corporate Executive was engaged to monitor strategic risk at regular intervals during COVID-19 restrictions and residual risk will be assessed to support future opportunities aligned to the department’s strategic intent.

    The way government manages records of information was never more important than during the response to the COVID-19 Pandemic. These records capture the evidence used by government to inform decision making, and the decisions themselves. Future generations will benefit from these records to learn from our actions.

    The COVID-19 Pandemic presented both challenges and opportunities for records and information management in 2019-20. The State Records Commission and State Records Office (SRO) contributed to measures that minimised the regulatory burden on agencies during the pandemic response. Relief to government organisations was provided in terms of simplified reporting and extensions to reporting timeframes where required.

    More extensive use of working from home arrangement by government organisations provided an opportunity for the SRO to work closely with these agencies on requirements for managing records of information created, managed, and shared between office and home business settings. This work contributed to an improved set of guidelines that will continue to be updated over time as organisations share experience with a more flexible approach to work.

    The COVID-19 Pandemic showed that some provisions in the Local Government Act 1995 and associated regulations could limit the ability for local governments to respond quickly to the emerging and ongoing emergency. In response to the State of Emergency, legislative amendments were identified to streamline and direct the operations of local governments for the purposes of responding to the direct and indirect impacts of COVID-19.

    The department established:

    • a COVID-19 dedicated email account to quickly respond to enquiries;
    • a COVID-19 taskforce to respond to any requests from the state government, to participate in cross-agency working groups and to work with WALGA in supporting the sector; and
    • regular local government alerts, circulars, and other written advice to provide the most up-to-date information on the pandemic situation for both local government and the community.

    The following changes to legislation were made to support local governments during the pandemic:

    • Allowing council and committee meetings to be conducted electronically;
    • Freeing up access to money by removing the requirement for a public notice period to enable local governments to borrow, repurpose borrowed funds or move funds between reserves;
    • Raising the tender threshold and allowing expenditure on goods and services related to the emergency without going to tender — with both amendments also designed to assist to stimulate the local economy; and
    • Providing access to accrued long service leave for staff stood down.

    A new part was added to the Local Government Act 1995 specific to the COVID-19 emergency. This created the powers for:

    • the local government, by absolute majority, to suspend a local law or part of a local law;
    • the Minister to issue an order that will suspend or modify a provision of Local Government Act 1995 during the emergency;

    A Ministerial order was gazetted on 8 May 2020, which:

    • Deferred the requirement to hold public meetings (electors’ general meetings and electors’ special meetings);
    • Provided alternative access to information when a local government’s office is closed;
    • Restricted interest that can be charged, including providing that ratepayers who are in financial hardship as a consequence of the pandemic, are not charged interest;
    • Removes requirements to advertise and seek Ministerial approval for rates if the local government does not increase their rates from last year; and
    • Eases restrictions on local governments setting their budget.

    Restrictions were placed on the number of people able to attend and the procedures for conducting funerals. The restrictions changed throughout the pandemic and the department kept local governments and the community informed of the changes as they were occurring via LG Alerts and information on the department’s website. The department also managed an exemption process throughout COVID-19 that allowed proposed variations (from individual families) to funeral arrangements to be considered while maintaining the interest of public health.  

    The cancellation and postponements of events has had a significant impact across the culture and arts sector in terms of generating revenue and sponsorship. COVID-19 has had a negative impact on employment within the sector. While JobKeeper has played an important role, many individual artists have not been eligible for the package. The ongoing sustainability of venues has faced considerable risk, particularly in regional areas, with performances and touring ceasing due to restrictions.

    Many arts and cultural organisations have adapted or enhanced their digital delivery and found ways to engage with existing and new audiences. The impact on the ability to make and sell work has had a significant impact on the wellbeing of artists and arts workers, particularly those in Aboriginal Arts Centres. Related sectors such as tourism, hospitality and the events sector have also been negatively impacted.

    The department redirected unallocated funds towards its U-15k Arts and Contemporary Music Fund grant programs. These programs support artists, groups, and independent organisations to maintain their creative practice, support skills development and to pivot their operations in new and innovative ways in this period. 61 applications were supported to the value of $806,535.

    The Art Gallery of Western Australia's Board and the Art Gallery's Foundation announced a $1.5 million support package, to help Western Australian artists during the COVID-19 emergency. Under the initiative, all living Western Australian artists represented in the State Art Collection received $2,000 towards creating an online State Art Collection archive. In addition, independent and art centre-based Aboriginal artists will share up to $525,000 through a targeted acquisition program to purchase existing works from up to 15 independent Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists and from 25 Aboriginal art centres.

    In total, more than 400 Western Australian artists will directly benefit from the initiative, injecting up to $1.5 million into the arts sector economy. WA artists who receive the $2000 will use the funding to generate archival content focusing on expanding artist bios, artist statements and extended insights into artistic practice.

    Screenwest launched the $2.5 million WA Screen Industry Sustainability Package which included two new initiatives for below-the-line crew and producers and production companies and post-production companies.

    The Bright Ideas Sustainability Fund and Taking Care of Business — Production Company & Producer Support Package closed for applications on Tuesday, 14 April 2020, however the following funding rounds are currently open for applications.

    The department provided $3 million in rent relief for funded organisations impacted in the arts industry.

    A new $1 million grant program was established through unallocated Regional Arts and Cultural Investment Program funds to provide vital funding to support ongoing creative and cultural activity in Western Australia's regions. The program is delivered by Regional Arts WA and will offer up to $15,000 to regional artists, cultural practitioners, and arts and cultural organisations. Applications for the first round of the program opened in July 2020.

    The State Government, through Lotterywest, committed $26 million in support for arts and sport organisations through two streams.

    • Event cancellation relief package - $10 million for not-for-profit arts, sports and community organisations experiencing financial hardship resulting from cancelled events resulting from COVID 19.
    • Resilient organisations - $16 million available for not-for-profit arts, sports and community organisations to continue to provide support services and activities for the benefit of the Western Australian community during the pandemic crisis.

    The department partnered with Lotterywest in the program’s delivery, providing critical support to the organisations that needed it most.

    Concurrent with the Lotterywest program, the department developed a number of initiatives to support sport and recreation organisations during the COVID-19 response phase. Almost immediately, the department made amendments to the KidSport policy to support families in need and clubs that may be suffering financial hardship resulting from COVID 19. The department developed a recovery framework to support the sector to plan for the transition back to the pre-COVID delivery of sport and recreation activities, providing a step-by-step planning process to assist organisations in developing a recovery plan. This framework is publicly available on the department’s website for use by all organisations, ranging from larger state sporting associations to small community clubs The department also acknowledged the challenges faced by regional WA, with support provided to not-for-profit organisation Fair Game to distribute sporting equipment to remote communities across WA.

    The easing of restrictions also presented opportunities where the department could support to sector to recommence community sport as quickly and safely as possible. Where large scale sporting venues were eligible to apply for an exemption under Phase 3 of the WA Roadmap, the department worked in partnership with the Department of Health to undertake the first stage of assessment ahead of the Chief Health Officer making a formal recommendation. The department also prepared regular infographics and updates to support the sector with the interpretation Emergency Management Act 2005 Directions and developed a range of supporting documentation to complement COVID-19 safety plans.

    To assist licensed premises through the height of the restrictions combatting the effects of COVID-19, the department:

    • Issued 4976 occasional licences to 640 licensed premises to allow the sale of a limited amount of packaged liquor with a meal for takeaway of delivery. The application form was streamlined and no fees were payable in recognition of the difficulties being experienced by businesses. The department received great feedback from licensees on this initiative with comments such as ‘it will provide a lifeline for us to remain open and to employ staff”.
    • Through the issue of occasional licences enabled licensees to ‘sell off’ excess stock instead of it being written off.
    • Issued 23 Extended Trading Permits to increase the licensed area for existing premises to assist them with managing the physical distancing restrictions whilst maximising the number of patrons allowed on the premises. The application form was streamlined and no fees were payable in recognition of the difficulties being experienced by businesses.
    • Approved applications to vary existing licence conditions to free up some restrictions and/or to reduce the overheads associated with operating the business. E.g. amending the crowd controller requirements to reduce the number of crowd controllers required on licensed premises in acknowledgement of the reduced capacity that venues were permitted.
    • Is refunding the 2020 annual liquor licence fees which will return approx. $3.26 million back to licensees; and application fees for events that were cancelled due to COVID.

    COVID-19 Case Study

    Sport and Recreation

    Coach Development Series

    The Peel Sports Forum and Coaches Forum planned for 27 and 28 March 2020 were cancelled due to the COVID-19 restrictions in place. The department considered how we could adapt and deliver an alternative Coaches Forum online using the high-level coaches secured for the event and continue to support and develop the coaching community within the Peel and South West regions. The webinar series was branded the “Coach Development Series” and was delivered in partnership with the Peel Regional Academy of Sports (PRAS).

    Program

    The Coach Development Series was held over four weeks in May and June 2020:

    SessionPresenterDateTimeTopic
    1Michelle Cowan AFL coach 20 May6:30pm-7:30pmHow to build positive team dynamics
    2Mark Worthington Olympic basketballer and coach 27 May6:30pm-7:30pmSimplicity in coaching
    3Jesse Phillips Olympic kayaker and coach 3 June6:30pm-7:30pmCommunication key to building relationships
    4Trevor Gleeson Head Coach Perth Wildcats 10 June6:30pm-7:30pmLeadership and motivation
    Statistics

    The series was promoted initially through the Peel/SW networks and on social media, but once promotion began, there was a high level of interest from coaches statewide that registered for the series. The presentations were well attended and accessed 517 times through live webinar attendance or video replays.

    Below is the key statistical data for the series:

    Total registrations: 337

    Total number of live webinar attendees: 352

    Total viewed video replays: 165

    Feedback

    Positive feedback was received from across the state with many comments of appreciation for organising the coach development webinars, providing access to high-profile coach presenters and the link to the video replay option which was frequently shared with other club coaches.

    Survey results showed that 98% of coaches improved their knowledge of coaching through the webinars.

    The four presenters all enjoyed delivering the workshops online, thought it was a great initiative by our department and would be happy to be involved in a similar format in future.

    Conclusion

    The series was a great success and enabled us to be innovative through the challenging times being experienced by our sport and recreation community. The overall feedback demonstrated a need to provide future learning and development opportunities to support coaches on any level and from any sporting code. The webinar format is supported by coaches and is an effective method to provide a broader reach and benefit to a statewide audience with good value for investment.

    SportWest DLGSC partnership case study

    SportWest, the peak body for sport, was a critical partner of DLGSC in its response to COVID-19 and supporting the sport sector.

    Starting with a series of impact surveys to the sector, SportWest became invaluable to ensure DLGSC had access to timely and accurate advice to inform its planning, in both the immediate COVID-19 response phase and as restrictions were lifted.

    DLGSC partnered with SportWest to establish the Reactivation of Sport Working Group, with the group becoming a critical mechanism to engage, consult and communicate key information to the sector relating to the State Government’s COVID-19 response and recovery planning.

    DLGSC joined SportWest, the Metropolitan Area Recreation Advisory Group, State Sporting Associations and other key stakeholders at regular e-meetings across May and June to ensure local government and the sport sector were working together to plan for the recommencement of sport. This culminated in the Community Season Crossover Agreement for Winter and Summer Outdoor (Green Space) Sports, developed by the sector to maximise participation opportunities across community sport and recognise the important role local government plays in enabling the transition between the winter and summer season.

    Vital to DLGSC being able to provide timely and accurate advice to the sector was the opportunity to present at the SportWest members meeting, with over 60 organisations represented. Given a level of uncertainty regarding requirements under the Emergency Management Act Directions, the opportunity to brief and hear from the sector directly was invaluable in developing the supporting documentation, including a fact sheet and Frequently Asked Questions.

    SportWest Quote
    The strength of the collaboration between the Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries, SportWest and its members enabled a situation where impact information was provided directly to the State Government, allowing for a quick and appropriate response to immediate issues at the height of COVID-19.

    Over the response phase, and now into the recovery phase, the partnership between DLGSC and SportWest has allowed the recommencement of sport and recreation to occur as quickly and safely as possible for the benefit of the WA community.

    Office of Multicultural Interests

    Working with CaLD communities

    OMI engaged with more than 200 CaLD community groups and service providers to ascertain issues facing Western Australians from CaLD backgrounds and ensure that COVID-19 related government messaging and resources are reaching communities. OMI also engaged more than 70 different faith communities and places of worship to support organisations to maintain COVID-19 restrictions and connectedness.

    OMI worked with Chinese community leaders and organisations to identify key issues around racism and its impacts on individuals, communities and local businesses. OMI is also collaborating with relevant government agencies, including WA Police, Department of Health, Department of Communities, Department of Premier and Cabinet, and the Australian Government Department of Home Affairs, to address issues and share knowledge.

    OMI also redirected the Community Grants Program to support COVID-19 response initiatives focussing on mental health and suicide prevention, family and domestic violence services, and support for young people from CaLD backgrounds.

    Translated materials and inclusive services

    Recognising that access to accurate information is of paramount importance, OMI worked with the Department of Premier and Cabinet to ensure COVID-19 community information is available in different languages so that Western Australians from CaLD backgrounds have equitable access to current information.

    Additionally, OMI has supported other government agencies, including the Department of Communities and the Mental Health Commission to ensure that critical government resources, such as the Cahoots service and the “Think Mental Health” campaign, are promoted and delivered appropriately to CaLD communities.

    OMI also worked with community groups to develop videos in several different languages that outlined key information and directed people to the wa.gov.au website for current, WA specific information. These videos were disseminated via community social media channels.

    CaLD Community Services Working Group

    OMI and the Ethnic Communities Council of Western Australia convened a working group of CaLD-specific community service providers to discuss the impacts of COVID-19 on service delivery and the needs of Western Australians from CaLD backgrounds. The working group is comprised of CEOs from fifteen CaLD Community Service Organisations that work across various sectors including disability, aged care, youth, family and domestic violence, remote communities, mental health and homelessness. This working group provided a platform to bring CaLD service providers together to share information, raise concerns and explore opportunities to collaborate in response to COVID-19.

    OMI and CaLD service providers were also represented on the Department of Communities Vulnerable Cohort Taskforces to ensure an inclusive approach to information collection and decision making on the current and long-term recovery needs of Western Australians from CaLD backgrounds.

    Culture and the Arts

    CircuitWest

    CircuitWest devised a range of professional development opportunities that were accessed online due to the COVID 19 restrictions on venues. During isolation individuals and companies were invited to improve skills in areas such as programming, pitching and setting up fundraising. In addition, it facilitated access to Mental Health and Wellbeing resources for people learn, share and use themselves.

    Spare Parts Puppet Theatre

    Spare Parts Puppet Theatre devised a series of DIY puppet making activities for creating your own puppets at home during isolation. Includes instructions on making a puppet, performance and filming. Delivered through their Facebook profile.

    Co:3

    Co:3, Western Australia’s flagship contemporary dance company launched The Bird Makers Project. It was an online activity perfect for social distancing creating an online community. Co:3 needed 1001 birds which were to be installed as part of the set of Artistic Director Raewyn Hill's new work, Archives of Humanity (2021). Step-by-step guides and instructional videos were provided online.

    WA Opera

    The WA Opera streamed Ghost Light Opera online. It was filmed before the closure of the theatre. The performance occurred on a dark stage in a closed theatre with empty seats. The opera posted one aria every Saturday until the theatre was reopened. The four singers include Fiona Campbell, Emma Matthews, Paul O Neill and James Clayton accompanied by Tommaso Pollio. WA Opera dedicated this initiative to the front-line health and service workers

    Fremantle Arts Centre

    In April 2020, following the cancellation of the ever-popular Revealed Exhibition and marketplace events, Fremantle Art Centre launched the Revealed Exhibition online. The online exhibition included a comprehensive catalogue showcasing 251 works by 130 artists and allowed consumers to view each work and find out more about the artists and art centres. Following the easing of restrictions, the Revealed Exhibition was opened to the public on 15 June 2020.

    Revealed generated total sales of $135,104, with Fremantle Arts Centre waiving all gallery commission on sales, ensuring that 100 per cent of profits were returned to the artists and Aboriginal art centres. 49 per cent of total sales were made during the first four days of the online catalogues release, with 123 of a total 160 sales made online.

    Racing, Gaming and Liquor

    Clubs WA INC.

    Licensed clubs in Western Australia sit across a number of different government departments, so it has been beneficial for clubs to work through Clubs WA in seeking timely responses to differing queries. Clubs WA has in turn worked closely with the divisions of Racing, Gaming and Liquor and Sport and Recreation.

    There have been a number of queries Clubs WA has been working with DLGSC for responses. This has, in turn, involved a number of emails, phones calls and meetings on behalf of the industry. Generally speaking, there have been concerns for compliance when clubs have not been covered by any government directions from the Emergency Management Act. This has included: the use of mobile licensed carts and golf carts on golf courses; the ability to undertake roll-ups and consume liquor seated on bowling surrounds; the ability to sell takeaway liquor to reduce stock, from premises prohibited from doing so pre-COVID-19; the process of the mandatory Safety Plans and COVID-19 hygiene training; and relaxation of licensing and other fees.

    Clubs WA was able to work with DLGSC on these topics to obtain a uniform departmental approach. In many cases clubs then liaised with their local police station for instructions regarding compliance with the Emergency Management Act.

    During Phase 2 the majority of clubs remained closed, given that sport was still limited as well. In addition, the 20-patron limit was determined too costly for clubs to engage cleaners and organise either staff or volunteers to work in the kitchen to supply meals for consumption of alcohol. The exception was golf and tennis clubs who with the exercise exemption were able to keep courses maintained for players. Takeaway alcohol sales were very important during this time for clubs that remained closed, particularly in regional areas. A number of clubs with restricted club licences expressed interest in applying/applied for the Occasional licence Extended Trading Permit to limit their excess stock during this time.

    The majority of clubs re-opened with Phase 3 with good membership support, with both sport and use of the licensed premises for food and beverage. Feedback was that the Phase 3 Directions were thorough and easy to follow and reflected stronger communication between the government departments. There remain a few queries for larger sport venues which are also licensed premises, particularly with patron limits for sport and licensed premise combined. Having access to Sport and Recreation and Racing, Gaming and Liquor within one department has assisted with gaining feedback more promptly.

    A number of clubs had chosen the COVID-19 recovery time to clean up their club, so were not able to open straight away when Phase 3 was introduced. Refunding of licensing fees has helped clubs who still have ongoing bills such as rent and utilities.

    Most clubs are now operating during Phase 3 with good member support. The challenge for clubs will now be to raise cash reserves to help with deferred payments and lost income from club functions and foodservice.

    The Director of Liquor Licensing has recently amended the policy to enable clubs to apply for 24 non-member extended trading permits during a 12-month period. Clubs WA expects that having the ability to hold extra non-member events will now provide clubs with an opportunity to increase trade and recover from the effects of the restrictions that were in place due to COVID-19.

    Bencubbin Sports Club

    During the COVID-19 Pandemic the Bencubbin Sports Club was fortunate that they were able to sell packaged alcohol for close to three months. Members were very supportive of the restrictions including turning off electric hot water systems, not using air conditioners and not using as many lights also helped to keep cost down.

    The club was not able to engage casual staff, so the committee volunteered during this time behind the bar. When the club was permitted to have meals, members again showed their support attending roast evenings during the weekends.

    The dedication from the committee during this time has been amazing and without their support our club would be in a much different situation.

    Gosnells Bowling Club

    The weeks after shutdown created many problems for the club with JobKeeper assisting to keep staff during this time. The subsequent problems were mainly about the health and well-being of our members. The steps taken by both the Federal and State Governments in regard to physical distancing which had a major impact on their well-being. There were also financial problems with no income at all coming into the club and expenses still being generated.

    Phase 2 gave the club an opportunity to get members back on the greens, which was very well received by although there were still major limitations on the greens usage.

    The limitations of serving alcohol without a meal had a major impact on the club, however during Phase 3 of recovery this problem was eliminated and gave members the opportunity to get out of their homes and socialise.

    The club arranged a busy bee leading up to the re-opening of the club and the greens and surrounds were kept to a very professional standard so that as soon as the club could re-open, members could utilise the greens.

    Australian Hotels Association
    WA is a highly regulated liquor jurisdiction, however during COVID-19 we witnessed DLGSC quickly and effectively address regulations and processes that could be streamlined to help the hospitality sector. This positive support for WA hospitality businesses came at a critical time in the path to the industry regaining its confidence and willingness re-employ more Western Australians.

    Comments attributed to Bradley Woods, CEO — Australian Hotels Association WA

    Pan Pacific

    At our State of The Hotel meeting with our colleagues the priority was to ensure that everybody was working. I shared with the team ‘how we react and behave now is how we would be remembered post pandemic’.

    • Pan Pacific Perth offered to accommodate through the City of Perth, RUAH and department of communities a cohort of our most vulnerable rough sleepers presenting as high risk.
    • At the end of the 30-day trial Pan Pacific were able to accommodate 15/27 long term homeless into permanent housing.
    • Under the State of Emergency, Pan pacific has hosted more than 1500 people from 31 March to 24 May 2020.
    • When the restaurants and bars were locked down, Pan Pacific built a pop-up café for take away in the hotel lobby and placed a BBQ on Adelaide Terrace selling bacon & egg rolls.
    • The pop-up café was so successful the hotel has built a permanent café in the hotel lobby creating 6 permanent barista positions.
    • The bacon and egg rolls were so popular, the Hotel launched Bobby’s BBQ Truck. Full bacon and egg profit from sales will go directly to RUAH for homeless housing where the Hotel hopes to purchase a new house every year. This has created 3 jobs for chefs.
    • The hotel has had a bottle shop provision since inception but has never used the option. The Lobby Café now offers a small bottle shop style offering of wines and local beers.
    • An a la carte service was created which has created an addition 7 full time positions.
    • Pan Pacific Perth employs 350 people across full time, part time and casual roles. 160 qualified for JobKeeper and have been actively working.
    • Pan Pacific Perth will be the first hotel to be fully accredited as a ‘Buy West Eat Best’ across the whole property. This means the Hotel are only using West Australian products in our kitchens.
    • This is critical for suppliers who are also hurting with restaurant and bar closures.
    Sneakers and Jeans
    As a hospitality veteran, and operator of multiple venues across Perth — the COVID-19 Pandemic struck us hard and fast. The capacity for DLGSC and our local government to work swiftly with us was extraordinary. The reduction in red tape, turn arounds and eagerness to “work together” and find solutions rather than hinder decisions with more questions… was fantastic and enabled my business and that of many colleagues, to weather the storm and come out the other side in a better, stronger and more positive manner.

    Andy Freeman

    Communicating during COVID-19

    Ensuring fast and accurate distribution of information has been vital during the COVID-19 pandemic. In culturally diverse Western Australia where more than 240 languages are spoken it is essential that information is both accessible and easy to share.

    OMI has been working across government departments to help make sure COVID-19 strategies have been inclusive of WA’s CaLD communities and that language and literacy have not been barriers to accessing information.

    From the onset of the pandemic, OMI worked with the Department of Premier and Cabinet to ensure that wa.gov.au, the portal for all COVID-19 information, featured key documents translated into 21 different languages based on English language proficiency data from the 2016 Census.

    The type of information translated included factsheets, FAQ documents, infographics, roadmaps and industry-specific guidance. OMI also developed a series of in-language social media tiles that community groups published on their own social media channels and worked closely with the COVID-19 Hotline to ensure that interpreting services were available.

    However, translated material is only one part of making sure the correct information is getting through. Best practice, as outlined in the WA Language Services Policy, recommends that audio and visual information is also provided to reach people who have low literacy levels in English and their first language.

    To address this, OMI partnered with community leaders and representatives to produce a series of in-language videos that were also distributed through community organisations’ email and social media platforms.

    When developing both the translated materials and the video, the emphasis was on providing information that could be easily shared, which was an important part of empowering communities to be a part of the recovery process.

    Underpinning this work was a focused community engagement initiative that ensured the information was being widely disseminated and that the format and content met the needs of CaLD stakeholders. Feedback from communities also enabled OMI to better tailor the content as it was being created.

    As we move into in the recovery phase, it is essential that all Western Australians have access to up-to-date information. OMI will continue to work across government to ensure that accessibility and inclusivity remain a priority.

    Agency performance

    Key achievements

    Regulation and support of local government

    The department supports local governments to fulfil their statutory obligations and to improve the capability of the sector to deliver effective governance and services to their communities.

    The department provides advice and support across the local government sector and uses a risk-based approach to identify those needing targeted intervention and assistance. The department supports the sector in the provision of good governance and compliance by monitoring, promoting and enforcing compliance with the Local Government Act 1995.

    The department reviews and administers a range of legislation impacting on local governments and the community. Through the provision of regulatory functions primarily related to the administration of the Local Government Act 1995 including approvals, compliance monitoring and other statutory support, the department assists local governments with best practice in the sector.

    The department is responsible for managing the State Local Government Partnership Agreement and the management of the Committee of Perth in accordance with the City of Perth Act 2016.

    Key achievements
    Local Government Act Reform

    The first phase of local government reform saw the passage of the Local Government Legislation Amendment Act 2019 on 27 June 2019. Most of the phase one reforms were implemented during 2019-20, including:

    • A new gift framework for elected members
    • A mandatory online induction for all candidates
    • Universal training for elected members
    • Easier access to information

    The following reforms are expected to be implemented in the second half of 2020:

    • Mandatory code of conduct for elected members, committee members and candidates
    • Best practice standards for Chief Executive Officer recruitment, performance review and termination

    Progress continued on the second phase, which will underpin a new Local Government Act. In November 2019, the Minister appointed a Local Government Act Review Panel to guide the strategic direction of the Act review and to consider and recommend high level guiding principles for a new Act. The Review Panel provided its Final Report to the Minister in June 2020.

    Stop Puppy Farming

    Following consultation in 2018, which resulted in 4754 submissions, the Dog Amendment (Stop Puppy Farming) Bill 2020 was drafted and introduced to Parliament in February 2020. The Bill passed through the Legislative Assembly on 25 June 2020 and will be debated by the Legislative Council in the second half of 2020.

    Dog and Cat Act Reviews

    The Dog Amendment Act 2013 and Cat Act 2011 came into effect in 2013. Both Acts were reviewed to see how effective the changes have been in the control and management of dogs and cats in Western Australia.

    A consultation paper: Pause for Paws, Feedback on Dog and Cat Laws in WA was released for public consultation on 12 May 2019. Department staff held workshops in metropolitan and regional centres to gather feedback from rangers and other local government staff. Key stakeholders were also consulted. Over 1,250 written submissions and 5,822 online responses were received.

    The final report titled: Statutory review of the Cat Act 2011 and Dog Amendment Act 2013 was tabled in Parliament on 27 November 2019.

    State Local Government Partnership Agreement

    Signed in 2017, the Agreement is an ongoing engagement mechanism between the State Government and local government to discuss and address issues of mutual interest. The Agreement Leadership Group meets twice a calendar year.

    Support for Local Government

    The department continues supporting the Peer Support Program into regional local government areas. The program is a collaborative effort between the department, Local Government Professionals WA and Local Government Integrated Planners Network.

    The purpose of the program is to facilitate meaningful peer support to participating local governments to help improve the content and performance of their Integrated Planning and Reporting framework through regional collaboration and resource sharing. The program has been widely promoted with interest from across the State. As part of the program and in response to COVID-19 a Community Resilience Scorecard was developed. The project has been funded by the department with pro bono contributions from CATALYSE®, Local Government Professionals WA and 139 Local Governments across Western Australia.

    The Scorecard was a state-wide collaboration to map community wellbeing, evaluate local government performance in response to COVID-19 and establish community priorities for the recovery phase. The scorecard reached over 7000 West Australian residents over the age of 18 years old.

    The department and Local Government Professionals WA partner in a CEO Support Program that assists Local Government CEOs to be better equipped to deal with the challenges currently facing the sector. Due to the impacts of COVID-19 in 2019-20, the program included: 16 local government CEOs who participated in coaching and mentoring; 30 CEOs who attended the Connections forums; with the executive leadership training postponed until early 2021.

    Local Government Making a Difference Award 2019

    The Western Australian Regional Achievement and Community Awards are designed to encourage, acknowledge, and reward the valuable contributions individuals, communities and businesses are making throughout regional and rural Western Australia. In 2019 the department funded the Local Government-Making a Difference Award, to acknowledge the tremendous contribution of local government in regional WA The inaugural winner was the Wheatbelt Secondary Freight Network Program which successfully bought together 42 local governments to improve road networks for the agriculture industry creating an efficient, sustainable and cost recovery model.

    Hand Ups Successful Participation in Local Government Decision-Making

    The department funded and collaborated with WALGA and the and the University of Western Australia to undertake research that establishes benchmark data about elected members in local government in Western Australia, following the 2019 Local Government Elections. The research will also determine the motivations to stand for new elected members and re-nominating members to provide baseline data for future census collections that will allow trends to be monitored.

    The project will collect longitudinal data over a four-year period, starting with an online survey of both newly elected and nominated members from the October 2019 Local Government elections. A number of elected members will then be interviewed at regular intervals over the four-year period to monitor their issues and challenges and also document their successes in the whole decision-making process.

    Switch Program —Regional Scholarships

    The department sponsored three regional scholarships for participate in the Switch Program. Developed in partnership with Curtin University and the City of Canning and supported by the department, the program is designed to build a culture of innovation within the Western Australian public sector, giving delegates the mindset, tools, evidence and confidence to switch on innovative thinking. Regional scholarships were awarded to the City of Mandurah, City of Albany and the City of Greater Geraldton.

    During the five days, the delegates identified their entrepreneurial strengths and areas of development, identified and tackled barriers of innovation, explored design thinking and other innovation frameworks and focused on supporting an innovation culture. The delegates then went on to work together on an Action Learning Project. These topics were selected by the delegates and aligned to the State Government priorities.

    Promotion and support of multiculturalism

    Through the development and implementation of policies, programs and services, the department aims to achieve the full potential of multiculturalism.

    Western Australia is one of the most culturally, linguistically and religiously diverse States in Australia, with 32% of the population born overseas and 53.5% of the population with one or both parents born overseas. The State is home to people from 190 countries, speaking 240 languages and dialects, including Indigenous languages, and following more than 100 faiths.

    OMI works with business and industry groups, government and non-government organisations, CaLD communities and the wider community to develop and implement culturally inclusive policies, programs and services.

    Key achievements
    Launch of the Western Australian Multicultural Policy Framework

    In February 2020, Cabinet approved the Western Australian Multicultural Policy Framework (WAMPF). In March 2020, OMI officially launched the WAMPF that ensures all Western Australians have the opportunity to participate equitably in civic, social, economic and cultural life.

    The outcomes-focused framework sets out practical and measurable ways public sector agencies can ensure their operations and services are inclusive and accessible for everyone, no matter what their first language or cultural heritage may be.

    It emphasises the State Government's commitment to multiculturalism and highlights the extensive benefits of our cultural and linguistic diversity—encompassing our First Peoples, those born in Australia, and the migrants from more than 190 countries who have made WA their home.

    Developed after extensive consultations with the State's CaLD communities and service organisations, the framework is also a useful guide for local governments, non-government organisations and the corporate sector.

    Community Language Teacher Awards

    In August 2019, 20 community language teachers were recognised at the Community Language Teachers Awards held by OMI in partnership with Community Languages WA.

    Dr Nirosha Dilhani Kapu Arachchilage received the 2019 Outstanding Community Language Teacher of Year Award for her ongoing dedication towards the development of the Perth Sinhala School as well as the wider community languages sector in WA. The Community Languages Teachers Awards are held annually as part of Languages Week in Western Australia.

    Leadership and Governance Program

    In 2019-20, 19 new graduates joined an alumni of more than 133 professionals from CaLD backgrounds who have completed the department’s Leadership and Governance Program. The program encourages diversity at board level and supports OnBoard WA, a government initiative to connect people with WA public sector board opportunities. The graduates come from a wide range of professions including business, human services and engineering. They are all experts in their field and ready to contribute their experience to public, private and not-for-profit boards and committees.

    Community Support Fund

    In 2019-20, OMI launched the Community Support Fund, a three-year funding program to support not-for-profit CaLD service organisations and CaLD umbrella community associations to delivery services that address the unmet needs of Western Australians from CaLD backgrounds.

    The organisations to receive funding are:

    • Edmund Rice Centre WA — $255,000for its English and Computer Literacy Program to improve English language skills and computer literacy in recognition of the importance of these skills to successful employment and integration;
    • Centre for Asylum Seekers, Refugees and Detainees — $255,000for its Safety Net Project — a service that supports asylum seekers no longer eligible for case work services and basic income support following recent changes to the Commonwealth Government's Status Resolution Support Services;
    • Ethnic Disability Advocacy Centre — $170,000for its community English classes for people from non-English speaking backgrounds with cognitive and intellectual disabilities. The program aims to improve students' English skills and increase their independence to encourage their participation in education, employment and social activities;
    • Organisation of African Communities in Western Australia — $150,000for its services to African communities that aim to increase coordination of programs to Western Australian African community groups and members; and
    • Vietnamese Community in Western Australia — $150,000for the Integration Services for Vietnamese Program that addresses English literacy, education, isolation and provides education about the Australian legal system.

    The funding will improve services offered by CaLD community associations, and organisations that focus on settlement, disability, employment, health, mental health, and family and domestic violence.

    Arts industry support

    The department supports the delivery of arts and culture activities across Western Australia through funding programs and partnerships.

    Key achievements

    In 2019-2020 the department distributed more than $37 million in funding to bring a vibrant mix of arts and culture to Western Australian audiences. This included $20 million to non-government organisations, over $3 million awarded to individuals, groups and organisations through project grants, $1.7 million through arts sector partnerships $3.08million in Royalties for Regions funding distributed through the Regional Arts and Culture Investment Program grants programs, $1.7 million through the Regional Exhibition Touring Boost and $3.1 million to Screenwest.

    Regional Arts and Cultural Investment Program (RACIP)

    The Regional Arts and Culture Investment Program will deliver almost $20 million over four years to regional WA. Through strategic investments, it will build capacity in the regions and contribute to liveability and vibrancy of regional communities. The program delivers support to a range of regional arts and cultural activity and the first stage of the four-year program was rolled out in 2019-2020.

    Regional performing arts touring was supported through the Playing WA grant program with 6 successful applications supported to tour in regional WA. The state’s regional performing arts and entertainment centres were supported through business development and capacity building in conjunction with RACIP key delivery partner CircuitWest.

    The Aboriginal Art Centre Hub of Western Australia has been funded as a RACIP key delivery partner over the four years of the program to deliver a program of business development to support Aboriginal arts centres including an Annual Forum and work placements.

    As part of the establishment of RACIP’s Leveraged Creative and Cultural Planning program the City of Albany was funded for a pilot project in February 2020 to engage a creative consultant to work with stakeholders to create a regional Arts, Culture and Heritage Strategy.

    Regional Arts WA (formerly Country Arts WA) has been engaged as RACIP key delivery partner to deliver several grants programs. These include the Regional Arts Empowerment and Employment Grants which ensures the continuity of grant funding for regional organisations and individuals delivering arts and cultural activities in their communities and the Next Level program which supports the creative and professional development for young emerging artists and arts workers based in regional WA.

    The Regional and Remote Festivals Fund grants program aims to increase arts and cultural activity in regional and remote WA by supporting the costs associated with delivering arts activity occurring as part of a festival. The first round of the grant program had six successful applications.

    Several of the funded activities were delayed in their delivery timelines due to COVID-19.

    Contemporary Music Fund (CMF)

    The State Government has provided election commitment funding of $3 million over four years for the CMF to support and enhance opportunities for the music industry in WA. The CMF Grant Program commenced in 2019-2020 with 41 successful applications with funding going to recording, professional development and touring. In addition, support was provided to targeted initiatives including: Safer Venues which aims to prevent gender and sexually-based violence and harassment in music venues, Girl’s Rock — empowering young female musicians, WAM Regional Recording Programs in the Wheatbelt, Kimberley and Peel regions, support for 51 band-members and industry professionals to attend BigSound music showcase in Brisbane and additional support to enhance the WAMCon music conference.

    Revealed

    Due to the COVID-19 pandemic Revealed 2020 was moved to an online exhibition and the program of activities, including the marketplace and professional development program were cancelled. The online exhibition was an overwhelming success with 12,522 engaged views across 10 countries. The exhibition featured 251 works from 130 emerging Aboriginal artists, including independent and Noongar artists from metropolitan Perth and the South West alongside artists from 24 remote and regional art centers. Following the easing of restrictions Revealed opened to the public mid-June 2020, with 7129 visitors to the gallery. Revealed sales totalled $135,104 demonstrating that demand and appetite for West Australian Aboriginal art is still strong despite economic pressures.

    Virtual Reality Festival

    The first edition of the Virtual Reality Festival election commitment, Titled XR:WA took place in July 2019. The Festival presented public and industry events that showcased virtual and augmented and immersive media. The event engaged a broad cross-section of the community with over 5000 attendees, over 100 local and interstate speakers, 34 workshops, masterclasses and talks and a number of networking opportunities. The event successfully brought the industry together and provided a diverse public offer.

    Regional Exhibition Touring Boost

    Funded through Royalties for Regions, the Regional Exhibition Touring Boost (RETB) increases the number of visual arts exhibitions in the regions and increases regional access to the State Art Collection. RETB is delivered in conjunction with key delivery partners ART ON THE MOVE and the Art Gallery of Western Australia. Exhibition two There Were Moments of Transformation, the second tour from the State Art Collection featuring 40 works across sculpture, jewellery, ceramics, glass and video was scheduled to launch in March 2020, and a further exhibition scheduled to begin scoping and developing — Peregrinations of a Citizen Botanist by artist Susie Vickery. In addition, a major engagement program — Conversations with Rain — and a capacity building program for regional Gallery Activators were all delayed due to COVID-19.

    Research, policy development, information and support

    The department contributes to the development of the State by delivering strong evidence-based culture and the arts policy, research and planning to achieve State Government outcomes.

    The department undertakes the development and implementation of research and industry projects to strengthen the policy basis of its programs and services.

    Working with a range of stakeholders and partners, the department provides information and opportunities to foster knowledge growth, connections and access to industry intelligence. This may include statistics on cultural funding, employment, attendance and participation, and WA’s values and attitudes towards culture and the arts.

    Key achievements
    WA Creative Industries Economic Snapshot, 2019

    This report provides information on the economic situation for creative industries in Western Australia. It includes data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics Census 2016 and Labour Force Survey.

    The WA creative industries contributed an estimated $3.3 billion in Industry Value Add (IVA) to the WA economy in 2018-19 and generated an estimated $175.9 million in service exports. The WA creative industries employ approximately 53,000 people and there are approximately 10,000 creative businesses in WA, most of them sole traders.

    Making Music Work: Sustainable Portfolio Careers for Australian Musicians

    The study explored the conditions and strategies needed for Australian musicians to sustain successful portfolio careers. The vast majority of Australian musicians’ careers encompass a variety of concurrent and often impermanent roles. Making Music Work: Sustainable Portfolio Careers for Australian Musicians (2015-19) was a national Australian project which examined the ways in which Australian musicians navigate their portfolio careers.

    A majority of Australian musicians undertake a portfolio career which encompasses a variety of concurrent and often impermanent roles. While this is not a new phenomenon, major shifts in how music is made, paid for and consumed, as well as a changing commercial, funding, educational and policy landscape, further complicate the factors which impact how musicians develop and sustain their careers. Making Music Work sought to provide a more nuanced and granular understanding of these key sector dynamics and how musicians navigate them.

    The project was funded by an Australia Research Council Linkage Grant and was led by the Queensland Conservatorium Research Centre, Griffith University, and Curtin University. DLGSC was an industry partner along with the Australian Council for the Arts, Create NSW, Creative Victoria, and the Music Trust.

    Australian cultural & creative activity: A population & hotspot analysis

    The aim of the research project is to investigate factors producing local and regional creative ‘hotspots’, which have well above average creative and innovative growth and potential. The project’s hotspot reports are informed by statistical summaries drawn from a diverse range of data sources including the Australian Census, the Australian Business Register, IP Australia registration data, infrastructure availability lists and creative grants and rights payments. Lead researchers from the project travelled to four of WA’s creative hotspots: Geraldton, Busselton, Albany-Denmark and Fremantle to undertake interviews with local representatives from the creative industries in 2019. The Geraldton and Fremantle reports have been published and the remaining two reports are forthcoming.

    This is an Australia Research Council Linkage project led by the Digital Media Research Centre at the Queensland University of Technology. DLGSC is a partner organisation, along with Arts Queensland, Creative Victoria, Arts NSW, and Arts SA.

    Arts Organisation Investment Program

    The Arts Organisation Investment Program (AOIP), the department’s multiyear arts organisations grant program, completed the process to assess and award funding for the period of 2020-2022. Utilising a streamlined application process, the updated AOIP was based on two new categories of ‘producing-presenting organisations’ and ‘service organisations’ and was more clearly aligned with the State Government’s objectives. The objective of the program is to invest in a portfolio of small to medium organisations that collectively create and present high-quality arts, cultural and creative experiences that reflect the State’s identity through telling WA stories. A total of 37 organisations were supported, with calendar year organisations commencing activities from 1 January 2020.

    COVID-19 Audience Outlook Monitor

    In April 2020 as a response to the global pandemic, the Audience Outlook Monitor commenced delivery in an Australian-first partnership between seven government agencies and two research organisations Patternmakers (Sydney) and WolfBrown (USA). The agencies involved include the Australian Government through its arts funding and advisory body, the Australia Council for the Arts, along with Creative Victoria, Create NSW, Arts Queensland, The Department of Premier and Cabinet (South Australia), the DLGSC (Western Australia) and the ACT Government.

    Baseline data was collected in May 2020 in a cross-sector collaborative survey involving museums, galleries, performing arts organisations and festivals from the country’s largest to micro companies in regional Australia. Over 23,000 respondents from 159 organisations contributed to the aggregated results that are freely available in an accessible dashboard to assist artists and cultural organisations of all kinds in understanding how audiences feel about attending events again.

    There are 21 Western Australian arts organisations and venues who have joined the study, including the National Performing Arts Partnership organisations, several Arts Organisations Investment Program recipients, small to medium arts organisations, regional performing arts venues and galleries across the metropolitan and regional areas. The Audience Outlook Monitor is a three-phase study that will continue to track how audiences feel about returning to events in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. Data will be collected from audiences again in July and September 2020.

    Corporate and asset and infrastructure support

    The department maintains cultural infrastructure on behalf of the Government of Western Australia and provides centralised services to the Culture and Arts portfolio and other agencies.

    The department also provides strategic policy, leadership and funding support to local government to promote and guide the development of sport and recreation infrastructure.

    The department delivers the Community Sporting and Recreation Facilities Fund, State Sporting Infrastructure Fund and a range of infrastructure related election commitments.

    Key achievements
    His Majesty’s Theatre refurbishment

    The department completed the delivery of the $6.5 million refurbishment of His Majesty’s Theatre, preserving its reputation as a world-class performing arts venue.

    His Majesty’s Theatre refurbishment included the installation of a custom designed orchestra pit lift, new stairways spanning between basement, ground and first floor levels, and a new box office. There were also upgrades to the core mechanical and electrical services and structural elements, Dress Circle bar, and public areas including a new bar and lounge area, café, bar and restaurant on the ground floor and the new universally accessible toilet facilities.

    These works have enhanced the functionality and safety of staff, performers and patrons of His Majesty’s Theatre, and reduced operating costs.

    Elevate

    The department has been working closely with the Art Gallery of Western Australia to deliver the election commitment to develop a new rooftop event space, sculpture garden and gallery. The open-air sculpture garden will feature works from the State’s art collection.

    The project design, which was completed in the second quarter of 2020, will include an external lift and bridge from the Perth Cultural Centre precinct which will allow patrons and visitors to access the rooftop after hours. Construction is scheduled to commence in late July with practical completion in December 2020.

    Local Projects, Local Jobs

    Delivered across culture and the arts, infrastructure, OMI and sport and recreation business areas, the department continued with the delivery of 251 Local Projects, Local Jobs funding agreements to the value of $13.9 million.

    New museum project

    The department continues to work closely with the Western Australian Museum and the Department of Finance to deliver the $400 million new museum project.

    Developed in the heart of the Perth Cultural Centre, it will share the stories of our people and place; acting as a gateway to explore all of Western Australia. It will reflect the extraordinary history, distinctiveness, creativity and diversity of our State and region. The museum is on schedule to open in November 2020.

    Asset maintenance program

    The department provides asset maintenance services to 27 cultural sites and over 65 buildings across Western Australia, from Carnarvon to Albany. These buildings, the majority of which are heritage listed, are used for the exhibition and safe storage of the State’s cultural and arts collections, performing arts, conservation and research.

    Relocation of the West Australian Football Commission (WAFC) to Tuart College

    The department successfully completed fit-out works at Tuart College to allow for the relocation of the West Australian Football Commission from Subiaco Oval.

    Review of the State Sporting Infrastructure Plan

    The State Sporting Infrastructure Plan, which serves as a blueprint for the provision of State, national and international level sporting infrastructure in Western Australia, was reviewed. The Plan provides the State Government with a proactive approach to planning and guides the government’s investment in sporting infrastructure in relation to new capital projects and ongoing maintenance and upgrades.

    State Sporting Infrastructure Fund (SSIF)

    The SSIF provides funding for State sporting facilities managed and/or operated by state sporting associations in relation to planning, ongoing maintenance and upgrades that are less than $10 million. Projects over $10 million in value are considered as part of the Department of Treasury’s Strategic Asset Management Framework and the State Government’s budget process.

    Projects proposed for funding are identified and prioritised through the State Sporting Infrastructure Plan, through the completion of strategic asset maintenance plans for respective State sporting facilities and the department’s strategic asset planning process.

    In 2019-2020, SSIF funding of $2 million was allocated to 11 planning projects and four capital projects. In response to COVID-19, funding was reprioritised to support state sporting associations with the recovery of their operations and for the delivery of projects that would provide support smaller scale Western Australian businesses.

    State Sporting Infrastructure business cases

    During 2019-2020, the department progressed business cases for the State Tennis Centre, and the State Hockey Centre, and completed the business case for the SpeedDome.

    State Football Centre

    In June, the State Government announced that the State Football Centre would be developed in Queens Park in the City of Canning.

    The department is working with the Department of Finance, the City of Canning and Football West to develop a project definition plan for the project.

    The Centre will be a centre-of-excellence for football in Australia and the Indian Ocean rim and will include Football West’s administration, training facilities and pitches to support junior, high-performance development, as well as grassroots and community football programs.

    It is anticipated that the Centre will be completed in mid-2023, in time for the 2023 FIFA Women’s World Cup, enabling it to be used as a training and warm-up venue in support of the tournament.

    Community Sporting and Recreation Facilities Fund (CSRFF)

    The $12 million CSRFF provides financial assistance to community groups and local government authorities to develop community sport and recreation infrastructure. The program aims to increase participation in sport and recreation, with an emphasis on physical activity, through rational development of sustainable, good quality, well designed and well-utilised facilities. There were 67 projects approved for 2019-2020 worth over $10.4 million.

    Licensing — evaluation and determination of applications

    The department receives, processes and determines applications in accordance with the legislation.

    The department provides a licensing service for the liquor and gambling industries. Applications are considered and determined on their merits in accordance with the relevant legislative requirements.

    Applications related to the liquor industry are evaluated and determined by the Director of Liquor Licensing or appointed delegate and applications related to the gambling industry are evaluated and determined by the department on behalf of the Gaming and Wagering Commission. The department receives a service fee from the Gaming and Wagering Commission for assessing applications for the gambling industry. The number of applications determined is:

    • Total applications — 18,165
    • Liquor licence applications — 15,693
    • Community gaming applications — 1820
    • Wagering applications — 37
    • Casino applications — 615

    On behalf of the Gaming and Wagering Commission the department enables community and sporting clubs to fundraise through community gaming activities. During 2019-2020, the department approved community gaming activities that raised $67.9 million; with $26.7 million being returned to beneficiary organisations.

    Key achievements
    Liquor reform

    An ongoing initiative has seen the Director of Liquor Licensing issue an order under section 31 of the Liquor Control Act 1988 to allow liquor stores in regional Western Australia to trade on Sundays on long weekends. This arrangement removes the need for the licensees to apply for an extended trading permit to trade on these weekends.

    The department has also been working on streamlining approvals processes to save industry time and has further developed the online lodgement system with many applications now able to be lodged online. This should result in a reduction in duplication in information requests and applicants will be able to monitor the progress of their applications online and respond more easily to requests for information.

    Banned Drinkers Register

    The department has worked with the liquor industry to assess the feasibility and implementation of a Banned Drinkers Register (BDR) trial in the Pilbara region. The proposal incorporates an electronic system designed to identify persons who are not permitted to purchase liquor and notifies the licensee accordingly e.g. red light or green light. The trial is intended to provide benefits including better targeting of individuals who abuse alcohol to access support services, informing licensees where barring or prohibitions are in place and as a complementary measure to other harm reduction strategies.

    The trial is expected to commence before the end of the 2020 calendar year. Licensees in the trial area will participate on a voluntary basis over a two-year period. An evaluation of its effectiveness will be conducted.

    Australasian Racing Ministers Conference

    In November 2019, the department hosted the 2019 Australasian Racing Ministers Conference.

    The Racing Ministers Conference was held at Rottnest Island and attendees were provided with a tour of the island.

    The conference brought together Ministers and senior officers from New Zealand and all jurisdictions within Australia where a range of topics were discussed including the implementation of the National Consumer Protection Framework, status and impact of the point of consumption tax and the importance of an ongoing focus pm animal welfare, breeding numbers and jurisdictional integrity frameworks.

    Section 175 regulations

    Section 175 Restrictions are declared by the Governor of Western Australia on the recommendation of the Minister for Racing and Gaming. These restrictions:

    • apply to a declared area of the State;
    • may prohibit the bringing in, possession and consumption of liquor in the declared area; and
    • may provide for penalties to apply to people who contravene the restrictions.

    In 2019/20 two aboriginal communities, Jarlmadangah Burru and Parnpajinya, were declared liquor restricted communities under section 175 of the Liquor Control Act 1988 to prohibit the possession and consumption of liquor.

    The department also renewed 13 existing declarations under section 175 of the Act.

    The total number of communities that are now subject to declarations under section 175 of the Liquor Control Act 1988 is 25.

    Gaming Community Trust Grants

    The Gaming Community Trust is credited with funds derived from unclaimed winnings from Crown casino and community gaming and the Trust makes recommendations to the Minister for Racing and Gaming for grants that will benefit the community.

    In 2019-20, applications from the following organisations were approved to receive Trust funding:

    • Two Rocks State Emergency Service received $63,000 to purchase infrastructural items to support its search and rescue operations.
    • Jurien Bay Men’s Shed received $62,000 to go towards the cost of building its new shed premises.
    • Shine Community Services received $3212 to install hand rails and a drop-down step in its bus which is used to transport its elderly and disabled clients.
    • Kyilla Primary School Parents and Citizens’ Association Inc received $25,000 to construct an inclusive early childhood play space.
    • Showgrounds Community Men’s Shed received $25,000 to build a disabled toilet facility at its shed.
    • Town of Bassendean received $135,900 to complete the interior fit-out of the Bassendean Community Men’s Shed premises.
    • Pinjarra Community Men’s Shed received $66,343 to construct additions to its existing premises.

    Compliance audits and inspections

    The department performs audits and inspections to verify that the provision of gambling and liquor is conducted in a responsible and lawful manner.

    Under the legislative framework provided in the Liquor Control Act 1988, the department undertakes regular audits and inspections to regulate the sale, supply and consumption of liquor, and to minimise harm and ill-health to the public. Additionally, inspections are undertaken to ensure that licensed premises are being operated and maintained to a standard that meets consumer expectations.

    On behalf of the Gaming and Wagering Commission, the department undertakes audits and inspections to regulate the lawful conduct of gambling activities that are permitted under the Betting Control Act 1954, the Casino Control Act 1984, the Gaming and Wagering Commission Act 1987 and the Racing and Wagering Western Australia Act 2003.

    Key achievements
    Inspections

    The department conducted a total of 10,616 inspections during 2019-20; with only 240 instances of non-compliance. The low level of non-compliance, that being 2%, indicates that the monitoring and enforcement of responsible and lawful gambling and liquor services is in accordance with the relevant legislation, further demonstrating the effectiveness of the department’s enforcement programs.

    Areas of non-compliance in the 2% typically include conducting activities without a valid permit or licence or breaching conditions of permits.

    Compliance and education programs

    Through a robust and targeted compliance program the standards of licensed premises are monitored with the majority of licensees effectively meeting regulatory requirements.

    The continued education of existing and new licensees in terms of the requirements of the Liquor Control Act 1988 ensures the premises are operating and maintained to a standard that meets community expectations.

    Sport and recreation industry leadership and development

    The department provides strategic leadership and support for the sport and recreation industry across Western Australia.

    This is achieved through funding, resources and advice to State sporting organisations, community organisations and local governments. The department proactively engages with the sector to determine and implement strategic responses to current and emerging issues and to review the department’s programs and services.

    Built (including playing fields, recreation centres, trails, etc.) and natural (outdoor) spaces form the settings in which sport and active recreation occurs. Availability and accessibility of these settings contribute to participation and achievement.

    Key achievements
    Women in leadership

    The State Government established a target of 50% representation of women on executive boards and committees of State governing bodies. The department has provided support for sport and recreation industry organisations to achieve this target and address the gender diversity imbalance in leadership positions. This support included the establishment of the Gender Diversity Advisory Group, delivery of governance training, the development of the Gender Diversity Case for Change Report and online training videos outlining the economic, cultural and social benefits realised when a more balanced leadership structure is implemented. State sporting associations have until June 2022 to reach their target.

    Strategic Funding Review

    In May 2019, a Strategic Funding Review of the Western Australian sport and recreation industry was finalised. The review involved considerable industry consultation over the previous 14 months. The review contained 22 findings and 12 recommendations and focusses on ensuring the department’s funding programs are effective in supporting the industry. It also examined areas for improvement in how the department conducts business to simplify its requirements and reduce the administrative burden on smaller community organisations. 11 of the 12 recommendations have been implemented in the 2019/20 financial year, with the balance to be completed in 2020/21.

    The review has also led to changes within the sport and recreation industry with the re-branding of the WA Sports Federation to SportWest and the development of an industry Strategic Priorities document.

    Sport and recreation building capacity and participation

    The department provides support for organisations and personnel delivering sport and recreation State-wide from participation to the elite level through advice and funding support.

    Participation in sport and active recreation contributes to mental and physical well-being and the development of strong networks and support structures within the community. The department works with the industry to support athletes and teams to achieve at all levels, including local, national and international competitions.

    By building on the existing capabilities of individuals and organisations, the department enables them to operate at their best and provide quality opportunities for participation in sport and recreation.

    Key achievements
    Asian Engagement Sports Funding Program

    The Asian Engagement Sports Funding Program is supporting the delivery of the State Asian Engagement Strategy through the attraction of business and visitors to Western Australia to support local jobs and economy. In 2019/20 five State Sporting Associations were supported to further their engagement within Asian markets and in showcasing the State as a location for sporting development and travel.

    In addition to funding, the department hosted the leading sporting agencies in East Java, Indonesia and Zhejiang Province, China. During visits to Perth delegations from each country progressed negotiations with State Sporting Associations toward formal agreements to support sport development and exchange technical expertise. Each delegation also toured high quality sporting infrastructure available in Western Australia.

    Targeted Participation Program partnership with Healthway

    In partnership with Healthway, DLGSC delivers the Targeted Participation Program to enable organisations to promote participation, healthy lifestyles and active engagement of Western Australian communities in sport and recreation, with a focus on low participation groups. In 2019/20, $1 million of funding ($500,000 from Healthway and $500,000 from DLGSC) was available through this program, over 30 organisations across the state were supported to deliver outcomes for low participation groups and to enable more Western Australians to engage in sport, recreation and physical activity.

    KidSport

    The department has been working with local governments and the community to continue to deliver a streamlined, consistent and accessible KidSport program.

    In 2019/20, 18,596 KidSport vouchers were approved at a value of $2,553,923*. In 2019/20 the KidSport program reported positive demand from our diverse community including over 2300 (12%) of applicant's self identifying as Aboriginal, almost 1000 kids from WA’s CaLD community and 1200 individuals with a disability.

    The department has also collaborated with the Pilbara and Kimberley communities to deliver the CONNECT Kids pilot program. This pilot program is assisting kids through the support of local community groups, to connect with club sport opportunities in these regions.

    *KidSport voucher numbers between March — June 2020 were impacted by COVID-19 restrictions on community sport. The department is already experiencing a significant increase in early 2020/21 following the resumption of community sport.

    WA Trails

    The DLGSC worked closely with other agencies and the trail industry to respond to emerging workforce challenges and deliver the nation’s first Job-Ready Trails Construction Training program.

    The DLGSC hosted the WA Trails Forum which featured two interstate experts and attracted 100 people from across the industry. The event also included the launch of the Trail Development Series which provides direction for the sustainable planning and construction of trails.

    The DLGSC worked with stakeholders to prioritise and fund trails planning projects in the Kimberley, Pilbara, Metro, Peel and South West regions. One of these projects included the design of a trail that will be exclusively for Aboriginal people to guide visitors and promote Aboriginal enterprise.

    The launch of the WA Hiking Strategy added to the state’s trail strategies and will guide investment and development of trails and hiking activities for the next 10 years. This was the first strategy of its kind in the country and was launched at a time when participation had increased due to COVID-19.

    Steppingstone to an Active Life “Building Active Bodies and Brains”

    Coordinated by DLGSC’s Pilbara office, this program uses structured play-based activities in playgroups to foster an interest and engagement in physical activity and sport of children and their families. It adheres to the principles of quality practice in playgroups and enhances parent and carer self-agency so use their own skills to apply activities in the home environment thereby fostering their child’s sense of belonging, being and becoming.

    This program promotes fundamental movement skills, by drawing on the guiding principles of the Early Years Framework and was first piloted early February 2019 utilising placement university students. This pilot included the engagement and evaluation of Playgroups including resource availability and structure of sessions. The pilot informed further development of a broader implementation plan which has been developed in collaboration with partners and due for implementation Term 3 2020. The design and development are currently moving into an implementation phase with evaluation to run concurrently.

    Gascoyne Outdoor Recreation Strategy

    The Gascoyne Outdoor Recreation Strategy aims to achieve strong collaboration between multiple sectors to assist with identifying gaps in access and provision or outdoor recreation activities, service delivery and infrastructure; understand community expectations and values; and identify opportunities and barriers to development of increased outdoor recreation and nature-based tourism experiences in the Gascoyne region.

    A final draft of the Strategy has been prepared for public comment. Three face-to-face workshops will be held in Exmouth, Carnarvon and Denham facilitated to allow stakeholders the opportunity for final comment. Feedback from each workshop will be considered for implementation in the final version of the strategy prior to an official launch late in 2020.

    Making Her Mark — Women in Sport Forum

    The Garnduwa Making Her Mark - Women In Sport Forum brought together women of the Kimberley to improve their participation in Sport and Recreation, ultimately Ieading to healthier individuals, families and communities. The event consisted of a forum and training day, with practical and classroom sessions.

    Keynote speaker and special guest was Nova Peris OAM and the event hosted 60 participants 53 of whom were aboriginal. The program included presentations from the Fremantle Football Club, Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Service, Basketball Kimberley, WA Football Commission and panel discussion from key community leaders including Nova Peris, Mamingee Hand, Cissy Gore-Birch, Helen Ockerby, Cindy Pindan and Pep Wilson.

    South West Sports Development Foundation - Coach and Official Scholarship Program

    The South West Sports Development Foundation aims to assist coach and officials with the costs associated in identified and approved professional development opportunities. Applicants applied for scholarship amounts up to $1,000 and that assisted the professional development of their chosen sport as an official or a coach. In all a total of 17 scholarships were awarded with 11 coaches, 5 officials and 1 coach/official covering 9 different sports.

    Borden - Health by Stealth Project (Great Southern)

    The Borden project provided opportunities for interaction and program development through facilitation of five community health forums. Through the development of an interagency connection with the Borden Community and strong partnerships with Men’s Resource Centre, Cancer Council, Community Health/Albany Shantymen, Amity Health and Headspace, the program was able to connect the Borden Community to providers of adaptable, inclusive activities that all members of the community could actively participate in, regardless of age or ability.

    Activities were provided by Football West, Touch Football WA, WA Ultimate (Frisbee). Average attendance was between 40 - 45 participants per session representing a large portion of this small rural community.

    Recreation camps management

    The department provides experiential outdoor activities to the Western Australian community through the management of recreation camps.

    The department’s sport and recreation camps are a successful community service operation delivering quality, affordable, accessible camp experiences in Western Australia. There are four metropolitan locations: Bickley (Orange Grove), Ern Halliday (Hillarys), Point Walter (Bicton), Woodman Point (Coogee) and one regional location at Camp Quaranup (Albany).

    Key achievements

    The department’s recreation camps supported 800 unique camp bookings servicing 55,948 bed nights and 93,812 instructor led activity participations despite the COVID-19 impact on camp operations from Term 1 2020. Acknowledging a four-month reduction in normal services the camps provided over 140,000 physical activity hours in adventure recreation programming. The Woodman Point operation was used in partnership with Department of Communities to provide accommodation services throughout that COVID —19 lockdown period.

    Community participation

    Holiday programs were delivered through the Bickley, Ern Halliday and Woodman Point sites in 2019-2020 with 413 participants. Holiday programs were not offered in April 2020.

    Ern Halliday solidified its relationship with Scouts WA and the future use of the Gumbooya camp site where groups from Scouts/Guides accounted for 23 bookings across the year.

    Camps continued its partnerships with St John Ambulance (First Aid Responder Program), Department of Justice (Repay WA program) an Royal Lifesaving WA.

    Capacity building

    The Camps Chain Safety Group (CCSG) completed the procurement of full body harnesses as part of its program equipment asset replacement to fulfill service delivery requirements on Class 2 rated apparatus at all metropolitan camp sites. Members of the CCSG also collaborated on the Department of Education workgroup to develop the Recreation and Outdoor Education Activities for Public Schools Procedures 2021.

    Across the sites, landscape plans included the completion of updated bushfire management plans for Point Walter and Ern Halliday, arbor assessments at Bickley and review of the Fire Management Strategy at Quaranup.

    Facility management

    Camps introduced a replacement 12 bed leader’s cabin at Bickley Camp and new cool room facility at Quaranup to improve operating compliance requirements as part of our asset replacement strategy. Refurbishment projects were completed for Commodore bathrooms at Ern Halliday, the Kookaburra kitchen at Bickley and the replacement of flying fox infrastructure at Point Walter.

    The schematic design for the rejuvenation of the Spinnaker dormitory precinct was prepared to support a future upgrade of the accommodation amenity consistent with the other assets on the Ern Halliday site.

    Aboriginal History WA

    The department assists Aboriginal people to re-establish links to family through archival and genealogical research.

    This includes genealogical charts and Tindale photographs. In addition, the area manages access to restricted government records previously managed by the Department of Aboriginal Affairs. As well as these core services, the AHWA undertakes historical projects that provide an in-depth understanding of the Aboriginal history of Western Australia and assists in the healing and reconciliation journey.

    Further, the area responds to requests under the National Redress Scheme (Redress) from Aboriginal applicants throughout Western Australia. This work is undertaken in response to recommendations of the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse.

    Key achievements
    Aboriginal History Research Services (AHRS)

    AHRS provided comprehensive responses to 267 family history applications (an additional 6 were reviewed and found to be ineligible), 32 native title queries, 26 general research applications, 36 confirmation of birth requests, and 3 requests from the public trustee. It also responded to 195 requests for information under Redress and 24 Freedom of Information requests relating to the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse.

    There was a noticeable drop in family history and native title applications in the April to June quarter 2020, most likely due the COVID-19 shutdown. Despite this, the unit received 589 applications in total in the 2019-20 financial year, representing a 9% increase in AHRS requests when compared to the 2018-19 year.

    Gnarla Boodja Mili Mili (Our Country on Paper)

    Launched in September 2019, Gnarla Boodja Mili Mili (Our Country on Paper) is an online, interactive map that comprehensively documents traditional Aboriginal place names in central Perth. Thirty-one places with information about the Aboriginal significance of each place have been identified and recorded on the map. The project involved intensive research and the analysis of thousands of historical records that educates the community about significant Aboriginal areas in Perth and to record and preserve traditional knowledge. Gnarla Boodja Mili Mili is the first of its kind in Australia to interactively and comprehensively document the Aboriginal places in a capital city CBD area.

    The Museum of Perth has partnered with the department to deliver Gnarla Boodja Mili Mili as a travelling exhibition displaying a series of panels with information about the thirty-one Aboriginal locations. The exhibition opened at the Museum of Perth gallery in August 2020 and will tour metropolitan Perth as well as local libraries, schools and public places to share this important history with the wider community.

    Wadjemup, the Land beyond the Shore

    The department is finalising a research project dedicated to the history of the Wadjemup (Rottnest Island) as a place of Aboriginal incarceration. The project focuses of the period 1900 to the closure of the prison 1931. During this time 391 Aboriginal prisoners (boys, men and a woman) who were sent to the island have been identified. Hundreds of historical records have been examined and the information will be accessible through a culturally secure online database.

    Information about each prisoner’s ancestral linkage, date and place of birth and death, as well as details relating to their time spent on Wadjemup and their lives after their release is provided. Previously unseen photographs are also included. A comprehensive introductory summary and timeline compliments the database. The project is being undertaken in consultation with descendants of the prisoners as well as Prescribed Bodies Corporate, key Aboriginal organisations and other statutory authorities.

    Norman Tindale Collection — Name Index for Western Australia

    An internally created index to the Western Australia Norman Tindale collection has been finalised and will be accessible on the department’s website in September 2020.

    This database contains 15,000 entries of West Australian Aboriginal people from 52 locations across the State that were collected by anthropologist Norman Tindale between 1935 —1966. The project is supported by the South Australian Museum as the custodian of the Collection. This significant initiative will assist Aboriginal people to seek information about their family and heritage.

    AHRS Review

    In October 2019, the department commissioned a review of the AHRS with regard to the provision of a family history service. As a consequence protocols and guidelines for the release of restricted information managed by AHRS have been updated.

    This work aligns with recent consultation and findings facilitated by the Healing Foundation which identified the need for improved access to records as a source of healing and reconciliation for people impacted by the Stolen Generation. The AHRS continues to provide regular Aboriginal family history information sessions at the State Library of Western Australia and regional prisons. Information sessions have also been held with representatives from Aboriginal community organisations, Universities and community groups.

    State Records Office

    State information management and archival services, which consists of a regulatory/advisory component for all government organisations, as well as management of and access to the State Archives Collection.

    Digital transformation is changing the way government organisations work together and provide services to the community. Through the State Records Office the department is playing a significant role in supporting this change through more effective management of, and access to, information created and used by government.

    Key achievements
    More accessible services

    The State Records Office completed a project with the State Library to establish a single research space for WA History in the Battye Library. The new space is available to researchers at all Library opening times and appointments are now available for access to research support. The State Archives are also now easier to find in Library and Perth Cultural Centre through improved signage in and around the building.

    Thousands of Western Australian’s have explored the State Archive Collection through two new digital platforms launched this year. Culture WA is a simpler way to discover collections from across WA culture and arts institutions through a single online service; and RetroMaps is a popular new online map that makes it easier to access historical plans for Perth.

    Management of State Archives

    Today, most State records are created in digital format i.e. they are born digital. WA government organisations hold tens of petabytes of data in this form and that this volume of data is growing rapidly. There is also a significant volume of records in paper and other media. It is estimated that there are over 75 linear kilometres of paper-based State archives, as well has thousands of films and photographs, representing millions of individual records. The State Records Office is working with other government organisations to support appropriate storage, discovery and access to these archives as the essential evidence of the business of government in Western Australia.

    Strengthening information management across government

    In 2019-20 the State Records Office, in consultation with other agencies, commenced a significant reform of Standards and supporting systems to support information management in government in WA. This included consultation on a new, single standard for Managing Records of Information and a proposed Information Management Maturity Model (IM3) to simplify reporting and collaboration on information management. This reform program will continue into 2020-21.

    A detailed report on the performance of State records management in WA is available through the Annual Report for the State Records Commission.

    Report on operations

    Actual results versus budget targets

    2019-2020 Target # (1)2019-2020 ActualVariation (2)
     $000$000$000 
    Total cost of services (expense limit)192,965195,7702,805(a)
    Net cost of services173,368183,0889,720(b)
    Total equity717,784693,298(24,486)(c)
    Net increase/(decrease) in cash held(1,555)(17,613)(16,058)(d)
    Approved salary level44,38244,339(43) 

    # Target excludes Building Maintenance related to the statutory authorities. (1) As specified in the Budget Papers

    (2) Explanation of the above variances are explained as follows:

    (a) Total cost of services is above target (unfavourable) by $2.8 million mainly due to unbudgeted $3.5 million revaluation decrement on the fair value measurement of land and building assets.

    (b) Net cost of services is above target (unfavourable) by $9.7 million mainly due to $10.1 million decrease in revenue from user charges and fees due to COVID-19 liquor licence refunds and camps closures.

    (c) Total equity is below target (unfavourable) by $24.5 million mainly due to the drawdown on cash balances related to capital carryovers approved including the New State Museum project.

    (d) Net decrease in cash held is above target (unfavourable) by $16.1 million due to approved cash carryovers relating to the new museum project.

    Working Cash Targets2019-2020
    Agreed Limit
    2019-2020
    Target/Actual
    Variation
    (1)
     $000$000$000 
    Working Cash Limit (as budget)9,3749,374- 
    Working Cash Limit (as actuals)11,44039,75928,319(a)

    (1) Explanation of the above variances are explained as follows:

    (a) Working cash limit is above target by $28.3 million mainly due to delays in grant payments $4.3 million, additional other receipts of $4.6 million, delayed payments related to the New State Museum project of $11 million, reduced employee benefits payments $3.3 million and increased GST receipts $3.0 million.

    Key performance indicators

    Key performance indicators certification

    For the year ended 30 June 2020

    I hereby certify that the key performance indicators are based on proper records, are relevant and appropriate for assisting user to assess the Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries performance, and fairly presents the performance of the department for the financial year ended 30 June 2020.

    Duncan Ord OAM
    Director General
    Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries

    17 September 2020

    Key performance indicators

    The linkage between the government goals, outcomes and services to the community are outlined below:

    Government GoalOutcomeServices
    Better Places: A quality environment with liveable and affordable communities and vibrant regionsLocal governments were capable and well-governed
    • Service 1 — Regulation and support of local government
    A sustainable arts and cultural sector that enhances social and economic wellbeing
    • Service 3 — Arts industry support
    • Service 4 — Research, policy development, information and support
    Efficient and effective services to the culture and arts portfolio and government
    • Service 5 — Corporate and asset and infrastructure support to the culture and arts portfolio and government
    To promote, monitor and enforce responsible and lawful gambling and liquor services in accordance with legislation
    • Service 6 — Licensing — evaluation and determination of applicants
    • Service 7 — Compliance audits and inspections
    A strong and diverse sport and recreation system in Western Australia that is accessible, encourages maximum participating and develops talent
    • Service 8 — Industry leadership and infrastructure development
    • Service 9 — Building capacity and participation
    • Service 10 — Recreation camps management
    Strong Communities: Safe communities and supported familiesWestern Australia is recognised as a vibrant and effective multicultural society
    • Service 2 — Promotion and support of multicultural
    Outcome: Local governments were capable and well-governed
    Effectiveness indicator LG1: Percentage of local government that did not have an action taken against them under the department's framework.

    Why we measure

    The department supports local governments to fulfil their statutory obligations and to improve capability in the sector to deliver services to their local communities and through training, advice and support and a risk-based approach, the department identifies those needing targeted intervention and assistance. Part of the improved capability effort is targeted at assisting local government CEOs to be better equipped to deal with the challenges currently facing the sector.

    This measure allows the department to understand how local governments are performing regarding their governance to fulfil their statutory requirements and provide assistance to ensure the outcome is achieved.

    What we measure

    The department’s Compliance Framework outlines the approach taken to ensure that local governments, elected members and employees operate in compliance with the Local Government Act 1995 (and its associated regulations). It includes actions the department may take in response to possible non-compliance, including probity audits, investigations and authorised inquiries.

    How we measure

    The indicator shows the percentage of local governments that did not have an action taken against them (or any of their elected members of employees) under the Compliance Framework in the financial year. Records are collated of all activities taken by the department in response to possible non-compliance, to determine which of Western Australia’s 137 local governments did not have an action taken against them. The figure is then converted to a percentage. The two Indian Ocean Territory local governments are not included in this calculation, nor are the nine regional local governments established under Part 3 Division 4 of the Act.

    The figure reflects actions taken to respond to possible non-compliance, such as an investigation, or inquiry. It does not reflect the number of matters about which concerns were substantiated and/or remedial action was required. Note that the data refers to any ongoing compliance action taken in the financial year as well as any new actions initiated in the current financial year.

    Performance

    2015-20162016-20172017-20182018-20192019-2020
    Target
    2019-2020
    Actual
    Variance
    54%32%29%49%55%61%6%

    Analysis

    The increase in KPI performance in 2019-20 can be attributed to some compliance actions not being undertaken in 2019-20, as well as an overall decrease in new complaints being made to the department. For example, the action of monitoring local governments through a "watch list" was not undertaken by the Investigation and Assessment Unit in 2019-20 (four local governments were formally 'monitored' and included on a watch list in 2018-19); no probity audits were undertaken in 2019-20 (compared to three undertaken in 2018-19) and the number of new serious breach complaints received in 2019-20 was less than was received in 2018-19 (37 in 2019-20 compared to 43 in 2018-19).

    The department is continuing to consider how it may best support the sector with legislative compliance to ensure good governance and services are provided to the community.

    Effectiveness indicator LG2: Percentage of local governments with integrated planning and reporting plans reviewed.

    Why we measure

    Integrated Planning and Reporting (IPR) gives local governments a framework for establishing localised strategies and priorities, linking this information to financial planning and operational functions. All local governments are required to produce a ‘plan for the future’ under the Local Government Act 1995 that includes a 10-year Strategic Community Plan and a 4-year Corporate Business Plan.

    This measure allows the department to assess the level and currency of local government integrated planning, that will enable the delivery of future services to their local communities. The measure also allows an assessment of the sector’s compliance with the relevant legislation and to guide the department’s effort to support the improvement of local government capability and governance.

    What we measure

    The measure details the percentage of the overall sector (137 local government in WA) that have been reviewed by the department as having current IPR plans.

    How we measure

    The indicator is the percentage of local governments that had their planning reviewed. The total number of local governments reviewed is divided by the number of local governments and multiplied by 100 to report as a percentage. Regional local governments and Indian Ocean Territories are excluded for the purpose of this indicator.

    Performance

    2015-20162016-20172017-20182018-20192019-2020
    Target
    2019-2020
    Actual
    Variance
    100%96%38%87%25%100%75%

    Analysis

    The department focused on and achieved a review of all local government plans in 2019-20 as a baseline for the future approach to planning reviews. In 2019-20, all 137 local governments had published current integrated planning in accordance with legislative requirements.

    Outcome: Western Australia is recognised as a vibrant and effective multicultural society
    Effectiveness indicator OMI 1: Percentage of organisations and individuals who report that Office of Multicultural Interest had a positive impact on the promotion and support of multiculturalism.

    Why we measure

    The department, through the Office of Multicultural Interests (OMI), provides support to the multicultural sector to deliver a vibrant and effective multicultural society in Western Australia. This is achieved through the promotion and support of multiculturalism in Western Australia and includes providing information, advice, funding, training and support, and facilitating partnerships and collaboration to achieve the full potential of multiculturalism within the State. This effectiveness indicator provides a measure of OMI’s key stakeholders that believe through the support provided to achieve a vibrant and effective multicultural society.

    What we measure

    The Effectiveness Outcome is informed by OMI’s annual Stakeholder Satisfaction Survey and percentage of people who believe OMI has made a moderate to very significant impact in achieving the full potential of multiculturalism in Western Australia.

    How we measure

    Each year, OMI surveys stakeholders to gain feedback on the extent to OMI has made an impact on:

    1. Strengthening culturally diverse communities
    2. Supporting development of culturally inclusive policies and practices
    3. Facilitating full participation by culturally diverse communities
    4. Developing intercultural understanding
    5. Promoting the benefits of Western Australia’s diversity

    Respondents are asked to rate on a scale of no impact, a minor impact, a moderate impact, a significant impact or a very significant impact. The indicator score is calculated by analysing the average score of all five questions. In 2020, a sample drawn from a list of 1717 stakeholders were surveyed.

    The distribution of the 2020 sample was consistent with OMI’s stakeholders as follows:

    A community organisation59%
    Another type of non-government organisation22%
    A state government organisation9%
    A local government organisation6%
    A consulate2%
    A Commonwealth government organisation2%
     100%

    The final sample achieved was made up of 404 participants: 304 collected via the online survey and 100 via telephone (CATI). The data collection method (online or telephone) had no significant impact on the results and the sample size provided a good foundation for analysis. The sample results matched the proportional breakdown of OMI stakeholder type, meaning that the data did not have to be weighted and hence this did not lead to a reduction in the effective sample size.

    The overall response rate was 24%. The sample size and comparable results from the online survey are sufficient to be representative. Hence, the total sample provides a forecasting accuracy of +/-4.3% at the 95% level of confidence.

    Performance

    2015-20162016-20172017-20182018-20192019-2020
    Target
    2019-2020
    Actual
    Variance
    84%83%89%94%80%90%10%

    Analysis

    The 2019—20 result of 90% was higher than the target performance of 80%. This was due to OMI’s increased engagement through diverse projects and activities over the year, along with support provided through the COVID-19 pandemic. There is a drop of 4% from the 2018—19 result of 94%, but given the challenging environment faced by OMI’s stakeholders during the time the survey was conducted, this slight drop was expected.

    Positive feedback was also noted on the following areas in the survey report:

    1. 'Supporting the development of culturally inclusive policies, programs and services across the public and community sector’. The positive feedback in this area is likely to have been due to the development and launch of the Western Australian Multicultural Policy Framework (WAMPF), which was released on 17 March 2020.
    2. ‘Promoting the benefits of Western Australia’s cultural diversity’. This can be attributed to OMI’s work in supporting CaLD communities through grant funding programs, along with the promotion of WA CaLD community events and news through its digital media channels.
    Effectiveness indicator OMI 2: Percentage of community grants for multicultural organisations that were acquitted against identified outcome 2.

    Why we measure

    The department, through the Office of Multicultural Interests (OMI), provides support to the multicultural sector to deliver a vibrant and effective multicultural society in Western Australia. One of the keyways this is achieved is through the provision of grants for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CaLD) communities to undertake projects and initiatives that address community needs and which celebrate the different cultures that make up the Western Australian community. This indicator assesses the effectiveness of the projects that are funded in meeting their intended outcomes that will contribute to achievement of a vibrant and effective multicultural society.

    What we measure

    The department offers a range of grant programs which have defined outcomes to promote and support multiculturalism in WA and achieve a vibrant and effective multicultural society. Grant recipients are required to submit an acquittal report, which is assessed against the grant requirement. The measure reflects the department’s effectiveness in supporting multicultural outcomes in communities through an effective grants program and indicates the extent to which the funding provided is appropriately and effectively delivered to support community-led activities that either celebrate and promote Western Australia’s cultural diversity; build the capacity of individuals, families and communities to contribute to the civic and economic life of the State; improve the accessibility and effectiveness of services; and/or support the learning of community languages.

    How we measure

    The indicator is the percentage of grants successfully acquitted in the financial year that they were due to be completed. The measure is achieved by dividing the total number of acquitted grants by the total number of grants due for acquittal in the financial year.

    Performance

    2015-20162016-20172017-20182018-20192019-2020
    Target
    2019-2020
    Actual
    Variance
    80%94%93%98%85%93%8%

    Analysis

    The 2019-20 acquittal rate was 5% lower than the 2018-19 rate of 98%, this was due to some grant variations still being in progress and acquittals that were overdue by the end of year.

    Outcome: A sustainable arts and cultural sector that enhances social and economic wellbeing
    Effectiveness indicator CA 1: Ratio of government funding to other income

    Why we measure

    This ratio shows how the department’s funding to Arts organisations is leveraged. It provides an indication of how successful arts organisations have been in generating additional revenue and sourcing further funding to support an annual program of activity. At the aggregate level, it is an indicator of the sustainability of the multiyear funded arts organisations that collectively deliver culture and arts for Western Australia. They provide quality services and programs to support the arts and cultural sector to provide services to the Western Australian community.

    What we measure

    This represents the ratio of funding provided by the department to funded organisations against their income from other sources. This includes earned income, other government funding, sponsorship and private giving.

    How We Measure

    The total amount of multiyear funding and project funding paid by the department to funded organisations is calculated as an average ratio against the total of other earned income.

    Performance

    2015-20162016-20172017-20182018-20192019-2020
    Target
    2019-2020
    Actual
    Variance
    1:7.161:6.291:6.121:6.331:3.341:6.131:2.79

    Analysis

    In 2019-20 this indicator shows $6.13 of other income generated for every $1.00 of funding provided by the department. This ratio, which is calculated as an average of each organisation’s ratio, indicates that there is a slight decrease in leveraging from the previous year (minus 3 per cent). For multiyear funded organisations overall, the total Other Income increased (plus 6 per cent), combined with a slight decrease in funding from the department (minus one per cent). If the ratio was calculated based on the totals of Other Income and funding from the department (rather than the average of individual ratios), it would indicate an increase in leveraged funding.

    The changes to the underlying calculation in previous year is not reflected in the 2019-2020 target; had this been considered the target would be 1:5.83. The 2019-20 result reflects a better performance by the funded arts organisations in leveraging their funding.

    Effectiveness indicator CA 2: Public value of the contribution of arts and culture to the State’s identity and community

    Why we measure

    The department invests in arts and culture activities to deliver a range of social and economic benefits to Western Australia and measures the public value it creates through its investment in arts and culture. This indicator measures the value that arts and culture contributes to the state identity and community.

    What we measure

    This indicator measures institutional value, which is the value that society collectively places on arts and culture. Institutional value is a core value in the department’s ‘Public Value Measurement Framework’ (PVMF) which has been developed to better understand and measure the public value it creates through its investments in arts and culture. The other core values are instrumental value and intrinsic value.

    How we measure

    The annual Arts and Culture Monitor survey is used to provide data for this indicator. Respondents are asked the following two questions within the survey:

    • How valuable is the contribution of arts and culture to the identity of the sense of community in WA?
    • How valuable is the contribution of arts and culture to the identity of the state?

    Respondents are asked to rate the value of this contribution on a five-point scale from ‘no value at all’ to ‘very valuable’. The indicator score is calculated by determining the average index score (out of 100) of both questions. In 2020, 16,649 online panellists from Thinkfield were invited to complete an online survey, and 1,385 responses were received. This represents a sampling error of +/- 2.6 % at the 95 % confidence interval.

    Performance

    2015-20162016-20172017-20182018-20192019-2020
    Target
    2019-2020
    Actual
    Variance
    6869717368724

    Analysis

    The survey resulted in an average index score of 72, which has remained relatively steady since 2017-18 and indicates that the value Western Australian’s have of arts and culture has remained consistent over the past three years. The average annual increase of 1 index point since 2015-16 reflects the gradual increase in public perception over that time.

    The increasing public perception of the value of arts and culture to the sense of community and sense of identity in the State, is reflective of the department’s continued prioritisation of funding for organisations that target increased participation from communities that historically find it difficult to access and participate in arts and culture in the State. These include people living in regional and remote areas, culturally and linguistically diverse (CaLD) communities, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, young people and people living with a disability.

    The increase in the index against the target was 4 points. The target was set based on the expectation of a decrease in multiyear funding from the department which would drive a decrease in public perception. However, despite this decrease, public perception of the value of arts and culture has remained steady.

    Outcome: Efficient and effective services to the culture and arts portfolio and government
    Effectiveness indicator CAP 1: Percentage of annual infrastructure maintenance budget expended on portfolio infrastructure maintenance requirements

    Why we measure

    Many significant State-owned cultural infrastructure buildings, most of which are heritage listed, are vested in the Minister for Culture and the Arts. The venues are operated by portfolio agencies (WA Museum, State Library of WA, Art Gallery of WA and Perth Theatre Trust) through site managers. A number of the buildings are ageing, and the condition of the buildings impacts on its ability for the culture and arts portfolio to use these assets efficiently to deliver its services. These buildings are highly valued by the community and there is an expectation that that they are accessible and safe.

    This indicator is a measure of the effectiveness of the use and allocation of the annual infrastructure maintenance budget to the culture and the arts portfolio buildings. This ensures that issues are resolved in a timely manner and in the longer term decreases the cost of repairs.

    What we measure

    This indicator represents the percentage of the department’s annual infrastructure maintenance budget that has been expended on the maintenance and management of cultural infrastructure. For the purpose of this indicator maintenance includes the provision of utilities and security services to ensure operation of these buildings is maintained.

    How we measure

    The actual amount expended throughout the financial year on maintenance and management of cultural infrastructure divided by the agreed budget.

    Performance

    2015-20162016-20172017-20182018-20192019-2020
    Target
    2019-2020
    Actual
    Variance
    91.6%99.4%98%101%95%98%3%

    Analysis

    The high level of program effectiveness, with 98% of the budget expended, is due to detailed forward planning for the program. Cost estimates for work to be undertaken were, on average, consistent with the actual costs.

    Outcome: To promote, monitor and enforce responsible and lawful gambling and liquor services in accordance with the legislation
    Effectiveness indicator RGL 1: Percentage of audit and inspections that comply with requirements and statutory criteria

    Why we measure

    The department is responsible for regulating and maintaining the integrity of lawful racing, gambling and liquor activities for Western Australians to participate in. Through conducting compliance audits and inspections, the department contributes to the promotion, monitoring and enforcements of responsible and lawful gambling and liquor services and this indicator measures how effectively we are delivering the outcome.

    What we measure

    This indicator measures the effectiveness of the department’s regulatory function within racing, gambling and liquor activities by conducting audit and inspections at licensees’ venues and service providers.

    How we measure

    The percentage of audit and inspections that comply with requirements and statutory criteria is calculated by dividing the number of compliant licensees/service providers by the total number of inspections conducted.

    Performance

    2015-20162016-20172017-20182018-20192019-2020
    Target
    2019-2020
    Actual
    Variance
    98%98%97%97%95%98%3%

    Analysis

    In 2019-20, the actual compliance is higher than the target, indicating that licensees are generally effectively meeting regulatory requirements. Areas of non-compliance typically include; conducting activities without a valid permit or licence, or breaching conditions of licence and or permits.

    Outcome: A strong and diverse sport and recreation system in Western Australia that is accessible, encourages maximum participation and develops talent

    Effectiveness indicator SR 1: Satisfaction rating of policy development and leadership provided by the department

    Why we measure

    The leadership and policy support provided by the department contributes to the delivery of a strong and diverse sport and recreation system in Western Australia by promoting the understanding of government policy priorities and their relation and impact to sport and recreation. The leadership and support also ensure there is ongoing sport and recreation contribution to wider public policy agendas. This support contributes to a range of industry outcomes including the provision of quality participation environments, excellence in organisational governance and management, quality infrastructure provision and the coordination of sport and recreation services Statewide to maximise participation opportunities for Western Australians. This measures how satisfied the key stakeholders are with the policy support and leadership provided by the department.

    What we measure

    This effectiveness indicator is an average of the satisfaction ratings of key stakeholder (sport and recreation groups and local governments) of the department’s leadership and the relevance of the policy development and implementation support provided over the past 12 months.

    How we measure

    An independent survey of the department’s sport and recreation key stakeholders was undertaken during 2019-20 by Research Solutions Pty Ltd via online survey with telephone follow-up for all stakeholder groups. A total of 137 surveys/interviews with sport and recreation group representatives, 104 with local government representatives and 327 with recreation camp users. Due to the size of the total stakeholders’ group, survey contact was an attempted census with sport and recreation and local government stakeholders to meet the response rate (>50%) and sampling error margin (of +/- 5% at the 95% confidence interval). The response rate achieved was 67.2% for sport and recreation groups, 74.8% for local government and 51.1% for the recreation camps users.

    Percentage scores are derived from the Annual Stakeholder Survey, the aggregated percentage (Stakeholders’ satisfaction with leadership provided and policy relevance scores) is weighted based on the number of survey responses received from our key stakeholders (sport and recreation groups and local governments).

    2015-20162016-20172017-20182018-20192019-2020
    Target
    2019-2020
    Actual
    Variance
    93%93%89%91%85%89%4%

    Analysis

    Stakeholders satisfaction rating of the department’s policy development and leadership provided during 2019-2020 was 88% and 90% respectively, aggregated at 89%.

    The average over the past five years of 91% illustrates industry satisfaction that the policy development and leadership provided by the department is continually meeting sport and recreation industry and community needs.

    Effectiveness indicator SR 2: Satisfaction rating of the department’s consultation advice to clients

    Why we measure

    The department provides consultation advisory services covering a wide range of service delivery matters to sport and recreation service providers state-wide. This supports organisations in the policy implementation, project delivery and service delivery within their operating resources and budgets. Well informed, resourced and supported sport and recreation service providers are key components of a strong and diverse sport and recreation system in Western Australia and assist with ensuring maximum participation across the sector.

    This effectiveness indicator measures how satisfied key stakeholders (Clients) are with the consultancy and advice that the department provides.

    What we measure

    This effectiveness indicator is an average of the satisfaction ratings of stakeholders of the department’s advisory services (strategic and operational) to sport and recreation key stakeholders and the division’s responsiveness in providing advisory services.

    • Strategic — refers to advice provided regarding strategic planning, policy development and decision-making (e.g. organisational governance and management, infrastructure planning and design).
    • Operational — refers to advice provided regarding operational development and delivery (e.g. volunteer management, club development, youth programs).
    • Responsive — refers to the stakeholders’ perceptions of the way the department responds to requests for advisory services (telephone, email, correspondence, follow-up from seminars and workshops) regarding both strategic and operational issues for sport and recreation key stakeholders.

    How we measure

    An independent survey of the department’s sport and recreation key stakeholders was undertaken during 2019-20 by Research Solutions Pty Ltd via online survey with telephone follow-up for all stakeholder groups. A total of 137 surveys/interviews with sport and recreation group representatives, 104 with local government representatives and 327 with recreation camp users. Due to the size of the total stakeholders’ group, survey contact was an attempted census with sport and recreation and local government stakeholders to meet the response rate (>50%) and sampling error margin (of +/- 5% at the 95% confidence interval). The response rate achieved was 67.2% for sport and recreation groups, 74.8% for local government and 51.1% for the recreation camps users.

    Percentage scores are derived from the Annual Stakeholder Survey, the aggregated percentage (of strategic, operational and responsiveness scores) is weighted based on the number of survey responses received from our key stakeholders (sport and recreation groups and local governments).

    Performance

    2015-20162016-20172017-20182018-20192019-2020
    Target
    2019-2020
    Actual
    Variance
    88%88%85%86%90%81%-9%

    Analysis

    Stakeholder satisfaction with the department’s consultation and advisory services (strategic and operational) including responsiveness to requests for advice was 75%, 80% and 88% respectively, aggregated at 81% in 2019-2020.

    The satisfaction ratings for consultation and advisory services, both strategic and operational, were below target for 2019-20. Whilst satisfaction ratings recorded for both sport and recreation groups and local government stakeholders remained high in 2019-20, there was a decrease evident in local government stakeholders’ satisfaction levels with the department’s long term planning advice and responsiveness to requests for advice, which contributed to the overall satisfaction rating for this measure of 81%, a 5% decrease on that achieved in 2018-19 (86%).

    Overall stakeholders’ satisfaction for the department’s consultation and advisory services has remained high over the past five years with an overall average of 86%.

    Effectiveness indicator SR 3: Satisfaction rating of the department’s grant’s management

    Why we measure

    The department provides funding support through a range of programs including: Community Sporting and Recreation Facilities Fund (CSRFF); State Sporting Facilities Program (SSFP); Industry Investment Program (IIP) — formally the Organisational Sustainability Program (OSP); and the Regional Grants Scheme (RGS). The department’s funding programs are developed to support and enhance sport and recreation service delivery throughout Western Australia, contributing to a strong and diverse sport and recreation system Statewide which maximises participation and develops talent. This indicator assesses how well the key stakeholders of the department believe that the grant funding provided by the department deliver these outcomes.

    What we measure

    The satisfaction rating of the department’s management of grant funding programs takes into consideration stakeholders’ satisfaction with the following components of grants management including:

    1. Relevance of the funding;
    2. Process to apply for, and acquit funding;
    3. Support provided during the funding process;
    4. Follow-up advice following the outcome of the application;
    5. Clarity of documentation; and
    6. Information provided on the website.

    The stakeholder’s satisfaction rating of the above aspects is a direct measure of how well the department is managing the administration of our grants programs and meeting sport and recreation industry stakeholder needs.

    How we measure

    An independent survey of the department’s sport and recreation key stakeholders was undertaken during 2019-20 by Research Solutions Pty Ltd via online survey with telephone follow-up for all stakeholder groups. A total of 137 surveys/interviews with sport and recreation group representatives, 104 with local government representatives and 327 with recreation camp users. Due to the size of the total stakeholders’ group, survey contact was an attempted census with sport and recreation and local government stakeholders to meet the response rate (>50%) and sampling error margin (of +/- 5% at the 95% confidence interval). The response rate achieved was 67.2% for sport and recreation groups, 74.8% for local government and 51.1% for the recreation camps users.

    Percentage scores are derived from the Annual Stakeholder Survey, the aggregated percentage of stakeholders’ satisfaction with the department’s management of grant funding programs (the CSRFF, IIP and RGS in 2019-2020) is weighted based on the number of survey responses received from our key stakeholders (sport and recreation groups and local governments).

    Performance

    2015-20162016-20172017-20182018-20192019-2020
    Target
    2019-2020
    Actual
    Variance
    88%89%84%90%85%89%4%

    Analysis

    During 2019-2020, stakeholders’ satisfaction with the department’s management of grants programs was 89%.

    Overall satisfaction levels achieved in 2018-19 were maintained in 2019-20 with the decreased in local government satisfaction levels with the CSRFF application process offset by an increase in satisfaction levels by sport and recreation groups with the CSRFF application process.

    The satisfaction rating of stakeholders with the department’s management of grants programs has remained high over the past five years with an average of 88%.

    Effectiveness indicator SR 4: Satisfaction rating of the department’s programs, initiatives and resources

    Why we measure

    The department’s sport and recreation programs, initiatives and resources are developed in conjunction with key stakeholders responding to critical areas of need covering a wide range of infrastructure, organisational development and capacity building issues to ensure stakeholders are well resourced and well informed to facilitate a strong sport and recreation sector. The department’s programs, initiatives and resources are based on a combination of identified industry need and current government policy priorities and developed to encourage accessibility and maximum participation. The effectiveness indicator measures stakeholders’ satisfaction with the programs and initiatives being provided by the department to deliver a strong sport and recreation sector.

    What we measure

    Stakeholders are asked to rate the relevance of program and initiatives and resources separately and are provided examples as per the 2019-2020 period. The satisfaction rating of the relevance of programs, initiatives and resources is a direct measure of how well the department is meeting sport and recreation industry stakeholder needs in supporting sport and recreation service delivery outcomes within their specific markets.

    How we measure

    An independent survey of the department’s sport and recreation key stakeholders was undertaken during 2019-20 by Research Solutions Pty Ltd via online survey with telephone follow-up for all stakeholder groups. A total of 137 surveys/interviews with sport and recreation group representatives, 104 with local government representatives and 327 with recreation camp users. Due to the size of the total stakeholders’ group, survey contact was an attempted census with sport and recreation and local government stakeholders to meet the response rate (>50%) and sampling error margin (of +/- 5% at the 95% confidence interval). The response rate achieved was 67.2% for sport and recreation groups, 74.8% for local government and 51.1% for the recreation camps users.

    Percentage scores are derived from the Annual Stakeholder Survey, the aggregated percentage of stakeholders’ satisfaction with the department’s programs, initiatives and resources as being relevant scores. The scores are weighted based on the number of survey responses received from our key stakeholders (sport and recreation groups and local governments).

    Performance

    2015-20162016-20172017-20182018-20192019-2020
    Target
    2019-2020
    Actual
    Variance
    93%92%90%91%90%87%-3%

    Analysis

    The satisfaction rating of stakeholders with the relevancy of the department’s programs, initiatives and resources provided in 2019-2020 was 89% and 84% respectively, aggregated at 87%.

    The variation (-3%) to the 2019/20 Budget target (90%) was mainly due to a decline in satisfaction ratings (though not statistically significant) by local governments of the relevance of programs, initiatives and resources in 2019-20.

    The satisfaction rating of stakeholders with the relevancy of the department’s programs, initiatives and resources provided in 2019-2020 (87%) remains high but was lower than the average achieved over the past five years (91%).

    Effectiveness indicator SR 5: Western Australian participation in organised sport and active recreation

    Why we measure

    The department has a vital role to play with supporting the key community stakeholders (i.e. sport and recreation groups and local governments) throughout WA who are directly providing sport and recreation services to Western Australians. Targeted support to ensure quality service delivery, such as;

    • Sport and recreation infrastructure development;
    • Organisational development and capacity building;
    • Governance and management support;
    • Planning and policy implementation; and
    • Information and resources.

    This support ultimately impacts on the number of people participating in sport and active recreation. The measure of participation numbers within organised sport and active recreation participation reflects how well our service delivery system is working to deliver a sector that promotes maximum participation.

    What we measure

    Whilst not directly responsible for organised sport and active recreation participation rates, the department uses this measure as an indicator of how well the sport and recreation delivery system in WA is providing participation environments for members of our community. Analysis of any significant shifts in participation rates may highlight areas/issues within the delivery system that may impact departmental policy, planning and service directions.

    Organised sport refers to physical activity for exercise, sport and recreation that was undertaken through an organisation like a club or gym, or at a venue like a pool or an oval.

    How we measure

    The year 2016 represented the establishment of a new baseline for the monitoring of participation rates of adults and children in sport and physical recreation activities, both at the State and National levels.

    The monitoring and understanding of participation rates are vital to assist the department’s delivery of programs and services to support Western Australian’s ongoing participation and involvement in sport and active recreation.

    Sport Australia in consultation with the Committee of Australian Sport and Recreation Officers (CASRO) has undertaken to fund and manage a National Participation in Sport and Physical Recreation Survey (AusPlay) to better provide appropriate participation data to support current and future sport and recreation industry needs and outcomes. From late 2015, AusPlay became the single-source data currency for government and the sport sector that not only tracks Australian sport participation behaviours but also informs investment, policy and sport delivery.

    The AusPlay data is not directly comparable to previous participation data collections [i.e. the Multi-Purpose Household Survey (MPHS) or the Exercise Recreation and Sport Survey (ERASS)] due to variations in survey methodology relating to question wording, sampling and fieldwork approaches and non-response bias.

    Via the AusPlay Survey, a baseline for participation by Western Australians in organised sport and active recreation has been established. The baseline of 56% is an average of participation rates for WA males and females (aged 15 years and over) involved in organised sport and active recreation.

    Performance

    2015-20162016-20172017-20182018-20192019-2020
    Target
    2019-2020
    Actual
    Variance
    56%56%57%60%56%63%7%

    Analysis

    The department’s desired outcome is that participation rates for Western Australians in sport and active recreation ultimately be maintained and/or increased. In 2019, 63% of Western Australians (aged 15 years and over) were involved in organised sport and active recreation, a 7% increase on the baseline established in 2016.

    Effectiveness indicator SR 6: Satisfaction rating of recreation camps management and service delivery

    Why we measure

    The department’s recreation camps offer outdoor recreation programs that provide experiential learning opportunities to the community and promote increased physical activity participation in the outdoors that contribute to a strong and diverse sport and recreation system in Western Australia. This effectiveness measure assesses how the department’s camps service is viewed by participants.

    What we measure

    This effectiveness measure reflects the satisfaction rating of the department’s recreation camp stakeholders with venue, accommodation, management, program and catering at the camp they most recently visited. Stakeholders are asked to rate their satisfaction with:

    • Venue and accommodation — i.e. the standard of accommodation and meeting room facilities;
    • Camp management — i.e. the information provided, staff responsiveness and booking procedures;
    • Program delivery — i.e. knowledge and ability of the instructor and standard of the program; and
    • Catering provided — i.e. food quality and customer service.

    How we measure

    An independent survey of the department’s sport and recreation key stakeholders was undertaken during 2019-20 by Research Solutions Pty Ltd via online survey with telephone follow-up for all stakeholder groups. A total of 137 surveys/interviews with sport and recreation group representatives, 104 with local government representatives and 327 with recreation camp users. Due to the size of the total stakeholders’ group, survey contact was an attempted census with sport and recreation and local government stakeholders to meet the response rate (>50%) and sampling error margin (of +/- 5% at the 95% confidence interval). The response rate achieved was 67.2% for sport and recreation groups, 74.8% for local government and 51.1% for the recreation camps users.

    Stakeholders feedback is provided each year via the Annual Stakeholders Survey regarding satisfaction ratings on the areas stated above. The data is weighted based on the revenue breakdown of the camps. The ratings for all aspects are aggregated across all camps and reported below.

    Performance

    2015-20162016-20172017-20182018-20192019-2020
    Target
    2019-2020
    Actual
    Variance
    95%94%94%94%87%96%9%

    Analysis

    The recreation camps achieved a strong stakeholder satisfaction rating of 96% in 2019-20 with an average client satisfaction rating over the past five years of 95%.

    Service 1. Regulation and support of local government
    Efficiency indicator 1.1 Average cost per local government for regulation and support

    Why we measure

    The department provides training, advice, and support across the local government sector, using a risk-based approach to identify sector-wide issues and targeted assistance. The department aims to support the sector in the provision of good governance and compliance by monitoring, promoting and enforcing compliance with the Local Government Act 1995.

    The department assists local governments through the provision of regulatory functions primarily related to the administration of the Local Government Act 1995 including approvals, compliance monitoring and other statutory support. This measure assesses the efficiency of the department’s resources to regulate and support local governments.

    What we measure

    This indicator details the cost of the department’s resourcing in providing regulation and support services to local government, to ensure they fulfil their statutory obligations and to support the provision of good governance.

    How we measure

    The efficiency indicator combines the costs of both the proactive and reactive regulatory work undertaken by the department, as well as the costs of other services for local governments such as processing of statutory approvals and costs associated with the administration and amendment of the Local Government Act and other legislation and regulations. Funds expended on grants and subsidies are removed from the total cost, which is then divided by 137 (the number of Western Australian local governments; excluding the two Indian Ocean Territory local governments and nine regional local governments) to produce the indicator.

    Performance

    2015-20162016-20172017-20182018-20192019-2020
    Target
    2019-2020
    Actual
    Variance
    $76,070$78,881$98,803$76,743$90,129$99,795$9,666

    Analysis

    The average cost per service (2019-20 actual) is slightly higher than the target due to the department's continued focus to support and build the capacity of the sector, in particular throughout the COVID pandemic which resulted in amendments to Local Government Act and Regulations, as well as information on State of Emergency restrictions and easing declarations.

    Service 2. Promotion and support of multiculturalism
    Efficiency indicator 2.1 Average cost per project to support and promote multiculturalism

    Why we measure

    The Office of Multicultural Interests (OMI) conducts a range of projects and initiatives to achieve the objectives identified in its Strategic Plan and promote and support multiculturalism. These are projects and initiatives other than those funded through OMI’s grants programs and are critical to achievement of OMI’s remit to support and promote multiculturalism. The measure indicates the efficiency of OMI staff in delivering these projects to promote and support multiculturalism.

    What we measure

    Projects to promote and support multiculturalism are identified and detailed in the OMI operational plan. These projects are recorded and tallied each year. The measure includes the amount of human resources (measured in dollars) per project. As the projects are not grants but rather represent the work of individual staff members in delivering them, only staff costs are calculated.

    How we measure

    Projects are detailed in the Office of Multicultural Interests’ operational plan which is developed annually on a financial year basis, monitored throughout the year, and reviewed towards the end of the financial year. The total cost of the Office of Multicultural Interests, excluding grants, is divided by the number of projects as identified in the operational plan.

    Performance

    2015-20162016-20172017-20182018-20192019-2020
    Target
    2019-2020
    Actual
    Variance
    $101,061$99,118$110,916$87,974$106,917$90,958-$15,959

    Analysis

    The average cost per project was 14.93% lower that the target of $106,917 due to a lower than expected total cost of service for 2019-20, which was 11.4% lesser than the 2019-20 budget estimate. There were also a higher than expected number of projects in the operational plan, totalling 50, than the estimated 48 for 2019-20.

    Efficiency indicator 2.2 Number of grants and service agreements per full time equivalent

    Why we measure

    The department funds a range of community grants intended to promote and support multiculturalism in WA. The number of grants administered and service agreements managed by OMI employees engaged in these activities is a measure of productivity of the departments resources in administering the grants to promote and support multiculturalism.

    What we measure

    The department measures the number of employees engaged in administration of OMI grants and service agreements over the financial year.

    How we measure

    This indicator is calculated by dividing the total count of grants and service agreements by the number of full - time equivalent staff working on managing the grants and service agreements.

    Performance

    2015-20162016-20172017-20182018-20192019-2020
    Target
    2019-2020
    Actual
    Variance
    2733363333363

    Analysis

    There was a 9% increase in number of grants and service agreements per full-time equivalents compared to the budget target for 2019-20; this was due to a higher number of grants being awarded during this period.

    Service 3. Arts industry support
    Efficiency indicator 3.1 Grants operations expense as a percentage of direct grants approved

    Why we measure

    The department provides support to the Western Australian arts, cultural and creative sector through a range of funding programs, research services and policy advice. This support contributes to a vibrant sector that provides a range of opportunities for people to participate and attend activities, performances and exhibitions. It also provides opportunities for artists and arts organisations to develop their skills and the artform. Measuring the input costs of providing the grant funding as percentage of total grant funding is an indicator of the efficiency of delivering grants funding programs.

    What we measure

    The measure is the cost of resources to deliver a series of grant programs, as a percentage of the total funding delivered through those grant programs. The measure is primarily impacted by the level of funding provided, and the resourcing requirements of the target group of the funding program.

    How we measure

    The department supports the grants programs for the arts, cultural and creative sector through both the industry support (Service 3: Arts industry support) and research and policy support (Service 4: Research, policy development, information and support). Therefore, the percentage is calculated by taking the total operating expenditure for the division and allocating the expenditure based on staff. For the reporting period, the percentage split between the two divisions was 50% to arts industry support and 50% to research, policy development, information and support.

    Performance

    2015-20162016-20172017-20182018-20192019-2020
    Target
    2019-2020
    Actual
    Variance
    6.7%4.1%5.1%5.4%3.5%6.4%2.9%

    Analysis

    The 2019-20 Actual has increased 19% in comparison to 2018-19 due to a 6% decrease in the value of grants paid, as some grant programs were suspended within during the initial phase of the COVID-19 pandemic. The variance between the 2019-20 Actual to Target of 2.9% is also explained by the decrease in expected value of grants delivered.

    Service 4. Research, policy development, information and support
    Efficiency indicator 4.1 Research, policy development, information and support expense as a percentage of direct grants approved

    Why we measure

    The department provides support to the Western Australian arts, cultural and creative sector through a range of funding programs, research services and policy advice and support. This support contributes to a vibrant sector that provides a range of opportunities for people to participate and attend activities, performances and exhibitions. It also provides opportunities for artists and arts organisations to develop their skills and the artform. Measuring the input costs of providing the grant funding and policy support as percentage of total grant funding is an indicator of the efficiency of delivering grants funding programs to support the sector.

    What we measure

    The measure is the cost of resources to provide research, policy development and support to the sector. This measure is primarily impacted by the level of funding provided, and the resourcing requirements of the target group of the funding program.

    How we measure

    The department supports the arts, cultural and creative sector through both the industry support grant (Service 3: Arts industry support) and research and policy support (Service 4: Research, policy development, information and support). Therefore, the percentage is calculated by taking the total operating expenditure for the division and allocating the expenditure based on staff. For the reporting period, the percentage split between the two areas was 50% to arts industry support and 50% to research, policy development, information and support.

    Performance

    2015-20162016-20172017-20182018-20192019-2020
    Target
    2019-2020
    Actual
    Variance
    5.7%3.9%5.1%5.4%3.5%7.6%-4.1%

    Analysis

    The 2019-20 Actual has increased 40% in comparison to 2018-19 Actual due to a 6% decrease in the value of grants paid, as some grant programs were suspended within during the initial phase of the COVID-19 pandemic. The variance between the 2019-20 Actual to Target of 4.1% is also explained by the decrease in expected value of grants delivered.

    Service 5. Corporate and asset infrastructure support to the culture and arts portfolio and government
    Efficiency indicator 5.1 Average cost of service per full time equivalent

    Why we measure

    The department provides corporate, asset and infrastructure services to the culture and arts portfolio, which includes the delivery of asset maintenance and projects. This indicator measures the efficiency of department resourcing in delivery of these support services.

    What we measure

    This service determines the average cost per full time equivalent (FTE) provided for corporate, asset and infrastructure support to the culture and arts portfolio.

    How we measure

    This indicator is calculated based on total cost of services for corporate, asset and infrastructure divided by the total culture and arts FTE.

    Performance

    2015-20162016-20172017-20182018-20192019-2020
    Target
    2019-2020
    Actual
    Variance
    $171,457$138,820$246,636$319,290$22,003$285,299$263,296

    Analysis

    The underlying calculation for this efficiency indicator has been updated in 2018-19 to better reflect the departments service in providing the asset and infrastructure support to the culture and the arts portfolio. As such previous years results have been adjusted.

    The underlying change in the calculation was not reflected in the budget target. Had this change been incorporated, the budget target would have been $208,343 resulting in a variance of $76,956 or 37%.

    The variance of $35,034 (11%) between 2018-19 and 2019-20 actual is mainly due to the reduction in the depreciation and decrement in the value of the department’s assets.

    Service 6. Licensing - Evaluation and determination of applications
    Efficiency indicator 6.1 Average cost of determining applications

    Why we measure

    The Regulatory Services division provides a licensing service for the liquor and gambling industries. The average cost of evaluating and determining applications measures the efficiency with which the department carries out the application assessment.

    What we measure

    The department measures the average cost of evaluating and determining applications for the liquor and gambling industries.

    How we measure

    The average cost of determining an application is calculated by dividing the total costs for licensing services by the number of applications determined.

    Performance

    2015-20162016-20172017-20182018-20192019-2020
    Target
    2019-2020
    Actual
    Variance
    $554$460$476$490$448$437-$11

    Analysis

    The average cost of determining an application was lower than targeted due to a higher number of applications being determined than targeted.

    Determinations in detail:

    • 86% of the total applications determined relate to the liquor industry.
    • 14% of the total applications determined relate to the gambling industries.
    Service 7. Compliance audits and inspections
    Efficiency indicator 7.1 Average cost of conducting inspections

    Why we measure

    Under the legislative framework provided in the Liquor Control Act 1988, the department undertakes regular audits and inspections to regulate the sale, supply and consumption of liquor, and to minimise harm and ill-health to the public. Additionally, inspections are undertaken to ensure that licensed premises are being operated and maintained to a standard that meets consumer expectations. This measures the productivity of the department in conducting the required audits and inspections.

    What we measure

    On behalf of the Gaming and Wagering Commission, the department undertakes inspectorial and audit activities to regulate the lawful conduct of gambling activities permitted under the Betting Control Act 1954, the Casino Control Act 1984, the Gaming and Wagering Commission Act 1987, and the Racing and Wagering Western Australia Act 2003.

    This indicator measures the department’s efficiency in conducting these compliance audits and inspections.

    How we measure

    This efficiency indicator is determined by dividing the allocated cost of service for the activity by the number of inspections and audits.

    Performance

    2015-20162016-20172017-20182018-20192019-2020
    Target
    2019-2020
    Actual
    Variance
    $995$961$759$804$897$680-$217

    Analysis

    There is a 24% variance between the actual and target amount. This is due to more audits and inspections being conducted for the period therefore, the costs on average were reduced. Specifically, in the area of casino regulation, as a result of the COVID19 shutdown.

    Service 8. Industry leadership and infrastructure development
    Efficiency indicator 8.1 Average cost of providing consultancy (policy, advocacy and infrastructure) to organisations

    Why we measure

    The department provides consultancy and advisory services to a wide range of sport and recreation industry stakeholders statewide. This advice contributes to the delivery of a strong and diverse sport and recreation system in Western Australia and specifically relates to infrastructure planning and development; industry strategic planning; contribution to cross government collaborative initiatives; policy development and implementation, and advocacy/communication initiatives. Measuring the average cost of providing consultancy services to sport and recreation organisations demonstrates the efficiency in which the department provides industry leadership and infrastructure development services.

    What we measure

    This indicator measures the department’s efficiency in providing consultancy services.

    Consultation refers to a meeting/phone call with a group/organisation/representative at which a department staff provides advice of a strategic nature. Each group/organisation provided consultation advice in the 2019-2020 year is recorded.

    The efficiency measure is impacted by the number of organisations consulted, and the FTE attributed to consultation — both elements flexible dependent upon service outcome priorities within the department (i.e. roll out of new planning/policy/legislative requirements may require extra staffing allocation).

    How we measure

    The average cost of providing the consultancy is dependent upon the number of organisations provided consultancy (recorded as consultations through project databases within the department and managed via a spreadsheet system) and the overall cost of providing such services (inclusive of staffing, resources and program development, etc.).

    Performance

    2015-20162016-20172017-20182018-20192019-2020
    Target
    2019-2020
    Actual
    Variance
    $10,083$10,874$10,080$13,447$10,202$9,124-$1,078

    Analysis

    During 2019-20, the department has provided consultancy support to a greater than anticipated number of organisations. This reflects the department’s continued commitment to provide policy/strategic consultancy support across numerous topic areas to a wide range of sport and recreation industry organisations Statewide. The increase on the expected number of organisations provided consultancy support, was offset by an increase in the total cost of this service, resulting in a (-11%) variation to the 2019-20 budget target unit cost.

    Efficiency indicator 8.2 Average cost of providing the contact services (policy, advocacy and infrastructure)

    Why we measure

    The department provides contact services through seminars, forums, workshops and conferences where information is provided to sport and recreation industry personnel. These contact services contribute to the development of a strong and diverse sport and recreation system in Western Australia through the development and understanding of strategic and policy frameworks, government programs and initiatives specifically relating infrastructure planning, design and development; industry strategic planning; cross government initiatives, and advocacy/communication initiatives. This indicator assesses the average cost of providing contact services and demonstrates the efficiency of the department’s resources in providing services to support the industry in relation to leadership and infrastructure development.

    What we measure

    Contact services refers to contact by the department with an industry stakeholder through provision of a seminar, workshop, forum or via the ContactUs service where information, resources, advice and education are provided to organisations, groups or individuals supporting the delivery of sport and recreation in the community.

    How we measure

    The average cost of providing contact services is dependent upon the number of contacts made annually (as seminars, forums, workshops, conferences through project databases and managed via a spreadsheet system, ContactUs) and the overall cost of providing such services (including staffing, resources and program development, etc.).

    Performance

    2015-20162016-20172017-20182018-20192019-2020
    Target
    2019-2020
    Actual
    Variance
    $526$740$670$2,893$1,164$1,265$101

    Analysis

    Due to a significant increase in forum/seminar/workshop activity statewide this year compared to 2018-19, there was an 18% increase on the number of industry contacts achieved in 2019-20. This increased activity was offset by an increase in the total cost of this service resulting in an 9% variation to the 2019-20 budget target unit cost.

    Efficiency indicator 8.3 Average cost to manage infrastructure grants

    Why we measure

    The department provides infrastructure funding support through a range of grants programs including the Community Sporting and Recreation Facilities Fund (CSRFF) and the State Sporting Infrastructure Fund (SSIF). These programs contribute to the development of a strong and diverse sport and recreation system through the development of sustainable, good quality and well-designed infrastructure for sport and recreation statewide which encourages participation and supports talent development. Measuring the average cost to manage the infrastructure grants demonstrates the efficiency in which the department manages the grants program to provide industry leadership support and infrastructure development.

    What we measure

    Grants managed refers to the infrastructure grants managed by the department which have been either: approved, paid, recommended and not yet approved, not recommended and not finalised or finalised in the financial year.

    How we measure

    Average cost of grants managed is derived by dividing the overall cost of providing such services (inclusive of staffing, resources and program development, review and refinement) by the total number of grants managed.

    Performance

    2015-20162016-20172017-20182018-20192019-2020
    Target
    2019-2020
    Actual
    Variance
    $3,288$2,114$2,545$2,451$2,302$3,453$1,151

    Analysis

    The variation to the 2019-20 budget target was due to an increase in the total cost of service as well as a decrease in the total number of grants managed in 2019-20.

    The average cost to manage infrastructure grants was higher than expected in 2019-20 due to: an underestimation of the total cost of service during preparation of the 2019-20 budget target; as well as a lower number of CSRFF applications being received; and Local Projects Local Jobs grants being managed in 2019-20 compared to 2018-19.

    Service 9. Building capacity and participation
    Efficiency indicator 9.1 Average cost of providing consultancy (Organisational Development and Participation) to organisations

    Why we measure

    The department provides consultancy and advisory services to a wide range of sport and recreation industry organisations statewide to build capacity and participation levels. The advice provided specifically relates to organisational development; governance and management; contribution to cross government initiatives; supporting program development and implementation (i.e. programs such as: Kidsport, club development, participation and inclusion initiatives). The indicator measures the average cost of providing consultancy services to sport and recreation organisations which demonstrates the efficiency in which the department provides the services to build capacity and participation in the sector.

    What we measure

    This indicator measures the department’s efficiency in providing consultancy services.

    Consultation refers to a meeting/phone call with a group/organisation/representative at which a department staff person provides advice of a strategic nature. Each group/organisation provided consultation advice in the 2019-20 year is recorded.

    The efficiency measure is impacted by the number of organisations consulted, and the FTE attributed to consultation — both elements flexible dependent upon service outcome priorities within the department (i.e. roll out of new planning/policy/legislative requirements may require extra staffing allocation).

    How we measure

    The average cost of providing the consultancy is dependent upon the number of organisations provided consultancy (recorded as consultations through project databases within the department and managed via a spreadsheet system) and the overall cost of providing such services (inclusive of staffing, resources and program development, etc).

    Performance

    2015-20162016-20172017-20182018-20192019-2020
    Target
    2019-2020
    Actual
    Variance
    $13,554$15,523$13,565$11,413$17,946$21,779$3,833

    Analysis

    The variation to the 2019-20 budget target unit cost was primarily due to the inclusion of costs associated with the relocation of the WA Football Commission (WAFC) from Subiaco Oval which contributed to an increase in the total cost of this service. Thus, resulting in an increase to the average cost of providing consultancy services compared to the 2019-20 budget target.

    Without the WAFC/Subiaco Oval cost included in the total service costs, the actual cost of providing consultancy services in 2019-20 was $12,673, a (-29%) variation to the 2019-20 budget target and in line with the actual costs for 2017-18 and 2018-19.

    During 2019-20, the department provided consultancy support to a greater than anticipated number of organisations, reflective of the department’s continued focus toward increased policy/strategic consultancy support for sport and recreation industry organisations.

    Efficiency indicator 9.2 Average cost of providing the contact services (organisational development and participation)

    Why we measure

    The department provides contact services through seminars, forums, workshops and conferences where information is provided to sport and recreation industry personnel to enhance the capacity and capability of individuals and organisations to continually meet community sport and recreation needs and expectations. These contact services contribute to the development of a strong and diverse sport and recreation system in Western Australia and assist in the achievement of maximum participation. The contact services are specific to the areas of organisational governance and management, and policy and program implementation (i.e. programs such as: Kidsport, club development, participation and inclusion initiatives). The efficiency indicator measures the average cost of providing contact services and demonstrates the efficiency in which the department uses its resources to deliver capacity building services.

    What we measure

    Contact services refers to contact by the department with an industry stakeholders through provision of a seminar, workshop, conference, forum or via the Contact Us service where information/resources, advice and education are provided to organisations, groups or individuals supporting the delivery of sport and recreation in the community.

    How we measure

    The average cost of providing contact services is dependent upon the number of contacts made annually (as seminars, forums, workshops, conferences through project databases and managed via a spreadsheet system, ContactUs) and the overall cost of providing such services (including staffing, resources and program development, etc).

    Performance

    2015-20162016-20172017-20182018-20192019-2020
    Target
    2019-2020
    Actual
    Variance
    $309$413$344$789$798$635-$163

    Analysis

    The variation to the 2019-20 budget target was primarily due to the greater than anticipated number of industry contacts achieved in 2019-20. The increase in contacts was due to a 35% increase in forum/seminar/workshop activity statewide (activities such as: Women in Leadership, Governance and Leadership, Safety in Sport and Coach development) as well as the delivery of new programs such as the Covid-19 relief Webinars.

    There was also a 37% increase in attendances recorded (i.e. persons per seminar/workshop) in 2019-20 compared to 2018-19. Consequently, this resulted in a decrease to the average cost of providing contact services compared to the 2019-20 budget target.

    Efficiency indicator 9.3 Average cost to manage sport and recreation development grants

    Why we measure

    The department provides funding support through a range of sport and recreation development grants including the Industry Investment Program and the Regional Grants Scheme. These funding programs are developed in response to critical areas of need, and cover a wide range of organisational development, capacity building and participation issues. Programs to ensure stakeholders are well resourced and supported contribute to the development of a strong and diverse sport and recreation system in Western Australia, which encourages participation and develops talent.

    Measuring the average cost to manage the sport and recreation development grants demonstrates the efficiency in which the department manages the grants programs that support capacity building and improving participation levels in the sector.

    What we measure

    Grants managed refers to the sport and recreation development grants managed by the department which have been either: approved, paid, recommended and not yet approved, not recommended and not finalised or finalised in the financial year. Note — Grants managed does not include social concessions paid directly to clubs such as Regional Athlete Travel Assistance or ‘KidSport’.

    How we measure

    Average cost of grants managed is derived by dividing the overall cost of providing grants management services (inclusive of staffing, resources and program development, review and refinement) by the total number of grants managed.

    Performance

    2015-20162016-20172017-20182018-20192019-2020
    Target
    2019-2020
    Actual
    Variance
    $2,002$1,893$2,026$1,990$3,021$2,548-$473

    Analysis

    The total number of sport and recreation development grants managed in 2019-2020 was greater than anticipated. This increase was primarily due to Covid-19 Relief Funding grants delivered in partnership with Lotterywest. Thus, resulting in a decrease to the average cost of managing the grants compared to the 2019-20 budget target.

    Service 10. Recreation camps management
    Efficiency indicator 10.1 Average Cost per bed night

    Why we measure

    The department provides quality outdoor recreation experiences which encourage participation and talent development in outdoor activities. These experiences are provided in unique recreation camps environments for a wide range of stakeholders, primarily for school and community not-for profit groups, across five locations. Measuring the average cost of providing accommodation options demonstrates the efficiency in which the department provides its recreation camps management service.

    What we measure

    The average cost per bed night measures the correlation between throughput volume of accommodation provided and the cost to deliver these accommodation services.

    How we measure

    The total number of bed nights is derived by multiplying the number of persons staying in the recreation camps by the number of nights stayed. The average cost per bed night is the total cost of running camps (management, staffing, maintenance, etc.) divided by the total number of bed nights (recorded in the Kinetic Booking system).

    Performance

    2015-20162016-20172017-20182018-20192019-2020
    Target
    2019-2020
    Actual
    Variance
    $57$53$55$64$56$93$37

    Analysis

    The variation to the 2019-20 budget target unit cost was due to the cancellation and postponement of normal recreation camps operations due to the WA Covid-19 lockdown, effective from 16 March 2020 through to 30 June 2020.

    Efficiency indicator 10.2 Average cost per participation

    Why we measure

    The department provides quality outdoor recreation experiences which encourage participation and talent development in outdoor activities. The department provides an extensive range of outdoor activities, delivered by skilled instructors in unique recreational camps environments across the five locations. Through this indicator the average cost of providing quality participation experiences is measured and demonstrates the efficiency in which the department provides the recreational camps service.

    What we measure

    Average cost per participation represents a camp participant’s engagement in a departmental organised physical activity program whilst attending the camp. This does not count for “freeplay” time or structured activities coordinated by the school, sporting association or community group. Participations typically represent an organised activity program of 1.5 hours.

    How we measure

    The average cost per participation is the total cost of running programs divided by the total number of participations, which are recorded for every group/stakeholder utilising the recreation camps via the Kinetic Booking system.

    Performance

    2015-20162016-20172017-20182018-20192019-2020
    Target
    2019-2020
    Actual
    Variance
    $24$24$25$27$28$39$11

    Analysis

    The variation to the 2019-20 budget target unit cost was due to the cancellation and postponement of normal recreation camps operations due to the WA Covid-19 lockdown, effective from 16 March 2020 through to 30 June 2020.

    To view the Audit Opinion, Certification of financial statements, the financial statements, and the Disclosures and compliance section, please refer to the downloadable version of the Annual Report.

    For the following content please refer to the downloadable PDF of the Annual Report:

    • Agency performance
      • Audit opinion - page 147
      • Certification of finance statements - page 152
      • Financial statements - page 153
      • Notes to the financial statements - page 158
    • Disclosures and compliance
      • Pricing policies - page 218
      • Major capital projects - page 218
      • Unauthorised use of credit cards - page 219
      • Ministerial directives - page 219
      • Governance disclosures - page 220
    • Appendices
      • Funding programs - page 240
    Page reviewed 26 August 2021